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NZBF Completely ignored feeder

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Gotta love the weather break, and the long weekend.

 

So checked in on the ladies. It's been two weeks.

 

Apricot hive is going great guns. It started with extra frames of food and drawn comb. This hive is now moving up into its next brood box.

 

Quince, not so much. The queen is 1 year older, and there was a bit of varroa pressure (now solved).

 

But despite feeding 2:1 syrup it is completely untouched (I've dumped two lots). The bees do have to cross 1 FD of foundation frames (which are slowly getting drawn out).

 

There's lots of nectar stored elsewhere and a bit of pollen, so I'm not worried about the stores. But is this a recognised behaviour, or a clue to bigger issues? (the books, and google haven't helped)

 

Cheers

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I would say if they've got nectar coming in and being stored, why even try to feed them?

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Gotta love the weather break, and the long weekend.

 

So checked in on the ladies. It's been two weeks.

 

Apricot hive is going great guns. It started with extra frames of food and drawn comb. This hive is now moving up into its next brood box.

 

Quince, not so much. The queen is 1 year older, and there was a bit of varroa pressure (now solved).

 

But despite feeding 2:1 syrup it is completely untouched (I've dumped two lots). The bees do have to cross 1 FD of foundation frames (which are slowly getting drawn out).

 

There's lots of nectar stored elsewhere and a bit of pollen, so I'm not worried about the stores. But is this a recognised behaviour, or a clue to bigger issues? (the books, and google haven't helped)

 

Cheers

They don't want it.

They must be on a honey flow and your syrup is inferior compared to the real thing haha.

You can probably stop feeding them if they've got food already.

 

I really don't understand why everyone is feeding syrup.

 

Imho hobbyists should have no reason to feed syrup.. I'm commercial and I don't feed syrup (except when I am forced to for kiwifruit pollination, I can't not, it's a requirement.)

 

If you have just acquired your hive it is a bit different.

But when you take your honey off in summer/Autumn bare in mind that the bees made that for themselves, not for you, you can take the surplus that they don't want to eat, but make sure you leave them plenty.

After all, they've made all that honey, they earnt at least a box for winter.

 

With the price of hives now...

If you are learning I almost recommend leaving all of that honey they make on until next spring when you have overwintered them and they have had it sitting there to use if they needed.

Just keep in mind that some varroa treatments will mean that you may have residues in your honey, there are treatments available that are safe to use with honey on too depending on your preference.

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Thanks @Daley, again. You're on fire tonight. Thanks, that makes perfect sense. Thanks for your advice about honey too.

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Thanks @Daley, again. You're on fire tonight. Thanks, that makes perfect sense. Thanks for your advice about honey too.

My mans away fishing so I'm bored lol

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Once nectar starts coming in the need will ignore syrup, especially if it is not near them. Be in the watch for bed weather though. When we first for into beekeeping we were earned that more hives starve out in October/November than any other time of the year. Big numbers can consume a lot in a patch of bad weather.

 

 

Once nectar starts coming in the need will ignore syrup, especially if it is not near them. Be in the watch for bed weather though. When we first for into beekeeping we were earned that more hives starve out in October/November than any other time of the year. Big numbers can consume a lot in a patch of bad weather.

Sorry, bees will ignore... Got to love predictive!

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take up of syrup is usually a reflection on hive strength.

if they are not taking it up then its probably very weak.

i can't recall ever seeing any decent strength hive ignore syrup for honey flow, dry sugar a different story.

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We have very strong hives suddenly on a flow and totally ignoring syrup. It happens every year if we get the feeding/flow wrong!

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take up of syrup is usually a reflection on hive strength.

if they are not taking it up then its probably very weak.

i can't recall ever seeing any decent strength hive ignore syrup for honey flow, dry sugar a different story.

I've seen them not take it heaps, usually when they're on something high yielding like citrus or squash

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I came across this just yesterday - apiary where I thought there would be a minor flow (if any) at the moment but I wanted to draw out some boxes of drone frames, so I put them on strong hives and gave a big feed of light syrup 2 weeks ago. Went back yesterday, some had taken up most of the syrup, some only half (in top feeders). Opened them up wondering what was wrong, to find fully drawn box of frames, mostly filled with capped honey, with some drone brood in the central frames, and back-filling honey into the brood boxes.

 

All the more confusing as I don't know what the flow is - haven't had hives in this area at this time of the season before. Only suspect I have is kowhai?

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