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Some advice please.When a swarm is captured and taken away..when the swarm is introduced into a new hive (empty) including the queen..is there any danger of the swarm escaping back to the orig swarming site?

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I've not heard of it happening. Nice waxy foundation for them.....

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Sometimes they just don't like their new home:cry:. Not had it happen very often thou.

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A swarm will leave its' smell on the original swarming site. Thia smell will attract returning scouts, foragers and other swarms.

 

I try to avoid this by hanging an air freshener block at the site. Other beeks spray air freshener or WD40.

 

There are ways to prevent a newly hived swarm from absconding.

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Sometimes when we catch a swarm they have obviously already decided where they are going and so abscond. Giving them a few drawn frames and a small feed tends to motivate them to stay and build the give.

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The current advice is not to feed the swarm so that they consume the honey they have brought along, to draw comb. If there are AFB spores in the honey they do not affect the adult bees. If the swarm is fedfed, that honey may be stored and fed to larvae who are susceptible to AFB spores.

We had one swarm develop AFB 2 years ago, and it was fed from the beginning - maybe just anecdotal, but it happened.

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If you have 'old' equipment use that in case of AFB, always quarantine them and treat for varroa and give them undrawn frames too. They are highly motivated to draw out comb. At this time of the year I would feed something unless I know they have access to nectar. Too easy for them to starve if the weather is bad.

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I have had one swarm abscond, I saw the queen on the wall behind the hive and then they were all in the air and settled 30m up a kaihikatea. I made a gate, from a plastic queen excluder, after that but I never remember to use it and it hasn't happened since.

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To avoid absconding, one trick is, when hiving the swarm, to place an excluder between the BB and the entrance. This should only be left in place for a few days.

 

I think a swarm is more likely to abscond if hived in non-pre-used equipment.

 

I believe that swarms have an urge to move away from the parent hive. I prefer to hive a swarm at least 400m from the parent hive.

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When we started out, not that long ago we caught lotsa swarms. We had no old gear. We hived them on very heavily waxed plastic frames. I also used to roll a bit of wax on the inside of the box sides. However we never ever fed swarms.

 

If you don't know where it came from, feeding it is very unwise.

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