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October 2016 Apiary Diary


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I did my first ever graft 4 days ago, 31 cells, had a look this afternoon, 6 cells......bummer! I had the hive set up O.K I think. I used a 000 brush, any tips with getting the larva off the end of the brush?? I was spinning the brush and pulling away and they seemed to come off O.K, but maybe I damaged them?

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I cannot understand Beeks willingness to feed swarms. Leave that to their own resources. They will draw comb fast enough without feeding.

That's 5 days of comb building. Would they have used up their tummy honey?

These days with so many commercial beeks having sugar fed hives everywhere, not a bad idea to build up your hive to strength ASAP to prevent robbing.

 

 

Thanks Trevor- I was pleased to have not donated them to someone else. They are about 5-6 frames worth. I just hope they approve of their new home. When should my first peek to see if they are establishing be please?

 

Have a look in 10 days time.

For seasoned beeks 10 days. For new beeks who wants to look sooner and more frequently, use perspex as a hive mat. Looking without taking a hive apart. Now I use that to show kids and adults visitors as curiosity.

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I checked a couple of Apiaries today. Swarm cell galore and no gear on hand to utilise the cells 1f641.png:( The best I coulld was what I had planned to do, make a split with the queen and a couple of frames of pollen honey and leave in original site, move all the other boxes 1 meter away to rear their own queen. The queen in the original position will get the majority of the foragers who will keep the small colony well feed while the queen keeps laying to boost the colony again.

Cut out a couple of frames of Drone Brood to cull any Varroa increase after treating and put it in the feeders that I took off and brought home. Forgot to take them off the ute, which within an hour got the bees robbing any honey that has oozzed out. Mayhem in the backyard, I ended up having to use the garden hose to mist them and get them to move on.

I took a short video of the mayhem.

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. Forgot to..........robbing.......Mayhem in the backyard......

Must have been the day for it. Guess who left the shed door open. Had to black out the windows with ply on the outside to get the bees to fly back out the door. Nothing they could rob. Just the smell coming from the stacked sealed wets :eek::mask:

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Must have been the day for it. Guess who left the shed door open. Had to black out the windows with ply on the outside to get the bees to fly back out the door. Nothing they could rob. Just the smell coming from the stacked sealed wets :eek::mask:

First time I extracted honey I put a fan in the room cause some frames were not fully capped.

A good job I had a screen on the open window next to fan .

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I did my first ever graft 4 days ago, 31 cells, had a look this afternoon, 6 cells......bummer! I had the hive set up O.K I think. I used a 000 brush, any tips with getting the larva off the end of the brush?? I was spinning the brush and pulling away and they seemed to come off O.K, but maybe I damaged them?

 

Wet brush.

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What a day for BK!

I am a Pretty happy new BEEK

 

The swarm of Nov 2015, swarmed 25/10, remaining bees now queenless but with a lovely QC.

Caught the swarmed swarm 26/10, but they had other ideas

Observing bees in swarm mode is quite something, catching them another, keeping them to stay ??

 

The original purchased Nuc (Nov 2015) has been split to form a new Nuc

So from 2 hives to 3 and a steep learning curve

@M4tt has been an awesome mentor and advisor....

Queen identified today, lovely golden girl, but disappeared for the photo,is in the original purchased Hive. She wasn't to be seen on Wednesday.

There's enough activity from the new Nuc. They scored the frame of frozen honey to make 5 frames in the box (yes I did thaw it first!)

 

 

Squashed x2 wax moth grubs!!

DECA signed off 26/10, instructions for next checks on board...

 

There is nothing like the hands on field experience

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Just been reading all these split related posts, questions I have is there a peticilar type of swarm preventing split that allows the parent hive to build back up to its former glory the quickest?

How long on average does a split hive take to get back up to pre-split size again?

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The closer the split is done to the main flow the stronger I make the Queenright part.

This is because the Queenright part has a job to do so needs critical mass.

Otherwise the Queen right hive is made smaller than the split and also moved away.

It all depends on the forage available and the timeline ahead.

"Using Cells"

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Just been reading all these split related posts, questions I have is there a peticilar type of swarm preventing split that allows the parent hive to build back up to its former glory the quickest?

How long on average does a split hive take to get back up to pre-split size again?

the less you take out of the hive, the faster it will recover. but the less you take the less swarm prevention impact it has.

as far as doing a half split goes, i've never really worried about recovery time. its kinda last resort thing, if you have to do it, you do it and pay the price. however i do try to aim to have parent and split end up being about the same size down the track a bit.

 

there are other methods to help reduce swarming @Dave Black

 

The closer the split is done to the main flow the stronger I make the Queenright part.

thats quite good.

if the flow is reasonably predicable that will work nicely.

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Sad day today. A small after swarm from a neglected hive. Follow-up with Asurequality today revealed an unacceptably high risk of AFB. The nuc was euthanased and burnt for the sake of the rest of the apiary.

This sounds interesting Rob, can you explain further.

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Sad day today. A small after swarm from a neglected hive. Follow-up with Asurequality today revealed an unacceptably high risk of AFB. The nuc was euthanased and burnt for the sake of the rest of the apiary.

I gather you caught it from a hive from a confirmed AFB apiary , but it never showed signs at your place, and you burnt it to be safe ?

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