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Goran

September 2016 Apiary Diary

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MAQS in all four hives today. The bees did not seem too bothered. A small bit of bearding to start with but by late afternoon they were 1. all inside or 2. all dead or 3. have moved out. I prefer to think it's number 1.

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Or "D" - all of the above ! Like a multi-guess exam paper answer sheet.

 

:)

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Found another supercedure today. Grubs present from about two days old. Only found one egg, period. Two torn down cells. No sign of old queen or virgin. It was middle of a warm day so she could have been out mating. Stacks of bees. Will check them in a week.

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As Jenny Morris sang, we had a "Break In The Weather" this afternoon and I was able to inspect hives, including the Swarm Bait Hive colony.

 

The Bait hive was very full with 8 frames of brood and LOTS of bees. The hive mat was a grain sack and has been replaced with a hardboard hive mat, The Weta didnt make the trip home, squashed when I put the tiedaown around the hive. There was a lot of propolis to clean up off the topbars and ends of the box, ended up with a ball of propolis a bit smaller than a cricketr ball. I came across one of my foundationless frames, it is a simplicity frame based on the design @Johnberry posted on the forum many moons ago.

All cleaned up and two frames of brood lifted up in to the second super. This hive is going gangbusters. Apivar in as well.

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That a healthy lot of free bees Dan. I'd be stoked

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That a healthy lot of free bees Dan. I'd be stoked

Yes they are a nice lots of bees. Very calm to work as well, no agro while I was scraping the poroplis off the bars and cleaning, just going about their business without a care.

I spotted the queen too..

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Hate it when they feel the need to chill on the edge of the frame, her rear is a bit dark. I think we are being converted to the dark side by stealth...:eek:

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Peek in a mating nuc too.'

Starting to drawn out comb.

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Hate it when they feel the need to chill on the edge of the frame, her rear is a bit dark. I think we are being converted to the dark side by stealth...:eek:

Yes a bit of the Carni there.

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The hive that had 3 queens is now 3 boxes of bees. And inspecting today guess what I found?

Swarm cells. I had a feeling this was going to happen as soo much pollen has been coming in. It has clogged up the brood area, in fact the bottom brood box had no brood because they filled it up with pollen and nectar the queen had moved up in to boxes 2 and 3. So a re-shuffle of frames to get the hive back in order. Queen found, swarm cells popped off. I will be checking this hive weekly now.

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Doing a food check at a site this afternoon all hives doing well, the three nucs there were disappointing and amazing one had died out one is struggling and the other...jeepers 20160918_153137.jpg.0423bd25537e61731277c4ae9f44aff5.jpg

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The hive that had 3 queens is now 3 boxes of bees. And inspecting today guess what I found?

Swarm cells. I had a feeling this was going to happen as soo much pollen has been coming in. It has clogged up the brood area, in fact the bottom brood box had no brood because they filled it up with pollen and nectar the queen had moved up in to boxes 2 and 3. So a re-shuffle of frames to get the hive back in order. Queen found, swarm cells popped off. I will be checking this hive weekly now.

 

This is what I would do, appreciate your objectives may be different. If they have formed swarm cells, and although you have removed them, it could be too late and more swarm cells could be on the way. Maybe an option is to split out at least two of the Q's into nucs, and then keep an eye on the parent hive, and split again using the swarm cells if you have to. Divide and conquer :cool:

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This is what I would do, appreciate your objectives may be different. If they have formed swarm cells, and although you have removed them, it could be too late and more swarm cells could be on the way. Maybe an option is to split out at least two of the Q's into nucs, and then keep an eye on the parent hive, and split again using the swarm cells if you have to. Divide and conquer :cool:

Yes, lots of options. I only need it to hang togetjer for a few more weeks when I will be splitting for nucs. Intensive mangagering of this hve until then. I want around 20 frames of brood from this hive when split time comes.

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Intensive mangagering

Is this something that can be done in public ?

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Is this something that can be done in public ?

No, its not recommended. Managing without mangling the spelling is the correct method.

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Is this something that can be done in public ?

 

Only in the Waikato..

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Did to do some Sugar shakes today while out and about.

We only did the biggest hives

Not a single mite.

Each shake was half of a half preserve jar 250mls I think that is.

Boxed some over winter 3 frame Nucs, they got acidified also.

Came home and read about a new treatment for controlling Varroa called pheromite.

Couldn't help thinking that it will need to be less than $1 per hive to get me off the acid.

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Cut from their website

Pheromite is developing a novel solution to treat Varroa. This comprises the development of two components:

 

 

  • A novel therapy to interact with and affect Varroa’s receptors, influencing their behaviour. This technology is expected to work by disrupting Varroa’s life-cycle or deterring them from entering beehives.
  • An automatic delivery system that controls the Varroa mite, initially through the use of a proprietary formulation of organic miticdes, and eventually utilising a novel therapy which Pheromite is developing.

 

Key Achievements

 

Pheromite, founded in January 2016, set out to identify Varroa’s receptors and anticipates completing this milestone within 2 months. Upon identification of a receptor, Pheromite will undertake a rational compound discovery process in which potential compounds are screened to determine if they can affect the receptor. Furthermore, Pheromite has also completed the design of the delivery system, for which it has filed a provisional patent.

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Oh crap. First time ever my hives are within 3 km of AFB on apiweb. Not at all surprised. I just wonder which apiary

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Oh crap. First time ever my hives are within 3 km of AFB on apiweb. Not at all surprised. I just wonder which apiary

Did you get a rob out notice or just red in apiweb?

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Did you get a rob out notice or just red in apiweb?

Just red in apiweb. All three sites, which are about three km apart so it must be close, or there are multiples

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Just red in apiweb. All three sites, which are about three km apart so it must be close, or there are multiples

I guess it's been found and reported but I can understand it's not a good feeling knowing it's close by.

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We got the rob out notice. Pretty scary. We had an inspector come around and check our hives on Thursday last week. All clear.

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It seems like there is a lot of reports of AFB. I have heard of a few cases in my surrounding areas of Auckland. @M4tt how do you view the red areas on Apiweb? Sorry to hear it is on your doorstep too

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how do you view the red areas on Apiweb

Just log in to Apiweb, go to 'Apiary Report' and if the apiary is in red, then a report has been made within 3km

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