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Goran

September 2016 Apiary Diary

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@Goran why did you think it would be a bad season for the black locast ?

As I learned black locust form flowering buds in August for next season. Last year at that time were devastating droughts and even some trees died ( more exposed). So this year beside bad weather flowers were less and smaller than usual and less smelling than it should.

This year was great with rains and no droughts, so next year if weather behave.. will be lack of barrels..

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As I learned black locust form flowering buds in August for next season. Last year at that time were devastating droughts and even some trees died ( more exposed). So this year beside bad weather flowers were less and smaller than usual and less smelling than it should.

This year was great with rains and no droughts, so next year if weather behave.. will be lack of barrels..

Lots of plants form their flowering and fruiting would in autumn.

When people predict the seasonal weather by how things flower in spring it may have some truth in it.

It could be that the autumn conditions are part of a big cycle weather pattern that may last into the summer.

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As I learned black locust form flowering buds in August for next season. Last year at that time were devastating droughts and even some trees died ( more exposed). So this year beside bad weather flowers were less and smaller than usual and less smelling than it should.

This year was great with rains and no droughts, so next year if weather behave.. will be lack of barrels..

Perhaps you should spend the winter melting down tanks & making barrels...:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

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Began spring checks today. Full AFB check, every frame. Scrape all the boxes and frames. Always very satisfying afterwards when the frames slide easily. I jammed a freezer rack into a fish bin and did all my propolis scraping over it. Amazed at how much collected in a short space off time. A bit of a rearrange here and there to make space for each queen.

 

The hive with the supersedure cell is very interesting. Glad I didn't rip it down. Last time I looked, the cell was open, the old queen was present and I didn't spot the virgin. Today the marked old queen is there and on the near side of the next frame is a beautiful big Italian mama unmarked. Stacks of eggs and uncapped larvae. Still plenty of drone brood but some big slabs of tidy worker brood aswell. Was tempted to split her off but decided to let the hive run its course.

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i did that, let the hive run its course and the old queen decided after co habiting with the new queen for a couple of weeks to take off with some bees.

but these were a very swarmy carniolan queen strain.

not well behaved italians

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Checked the ridge apiary yesterday and gave the four remaining hives ( out of five ) some tucker. Didn't spot any queens in the first three but plenty of eggs so no worries. Hive four and no sign of queenie by frame eight, and she walks across my veil. I put my hand up and she climbs on and I lower her to the hive and she hops in. I thought I should pack up there and then after nearly losing her. I only realised that it may not have been her hive after I got home.

 

How soon would an emergency queen be raised? And how long should I leave the hives alone to give it the best chance to grow a new queen and reestablish if I have inadvertently transplanted a queen?

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Checked the ridge apiary yesterday and gave the four remaining hives ( out of five ) some tucker. Didn't spot any queens in the first three but plenty of eggs so no worries. Hive four and no sign of queenie by frame eight, and she walks across my veil. I put my hand up and she climbs on and I lower her to the hive and she hops in. I thought I should pack up there and then after nearly losing her. I only realised that it may not have been her hive after I got home.

 

How soon would an emergency queen be raised? And how long should I leave the hives alone to give it the best chance to grow a new queen and reestablish if I have inadvertently transplanted a queen?

 

If you sent Q on a suicide mission, her hive will already be in emergency mode. Provided there are viable eggs / new larvae they'll get into it. I think it is the 4th day of a larvae's existence that the workers decide to keep on feeding it royal jelly instead of normal worker bee tucker. The Q will hatch in 14 days, hang about a bit, then head off for mating - more than one flight taken. Then start laying almost immediately. I'd give it 5 to 7 days and then take a look and see if any Q cells have been formed. In any event you mzy not have anything to worry about....you probably put her back where she belongs.

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Lots of plants form their flowering and fruiting would in autumn.

When people predict the seasonal weather by how things flower in spring it may have some truth in it.

It could be that the autumn conditions are part of a big cycle weather pattern that may last into the summer.

Male catkins on hazels already present even hazelnuts are on trees, but will flower late December, January, February..depends.

 

 

Perhaps you should spend the winter melting down tanks & making barrels...:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

Less fussy to export them to NZ and buy new Euro barrels :whistle:

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Began spring checks today. Full AFB check, every frame. Scrape all the boxes and frames. Always very satisfying afterwards when the frames slide easily. I jammed a freezer rack into a fish bin and did all my propolis scraping over it. Amazed at how much collected in a short space off time. A bit of a rearrange here and there to make space for each queen.

 

The hive with the supersedure cell is very interesting. Glad I didn't rip it down. Last time I looked, the cell was open, the old queen was present and I didn't spot the virgin. Today the marked old queen is there and on the near side of the next frame is a beautiful big Italian mama unmarked. Stacks of eggs and uncapped larvae. Still plenty of drone brood but some big slabs of tidy worker brood aswell. Was tempted to split her off but decided to let the hive run its course.

What will you hive do by letting it run it course? Will you let the old queen swarm?

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What will you hive do by letting it run it course? Will you let the old queen swarm?

Its a supersedure queen not a swarm queen .the old queen is failing so the bees have replaced her with a new one .the old queen will just quietly dissapear.

The supercedure cells are usually less than three cells often toward the middle of the frame and swarm cells are quite alot of cells and often along the bottom of the frame and up the sides

In general if theres more than 3 cells i think swarming

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Completed all AFB checks this weekend. Hives generally growing well without stimulation. All have laying queens. One found with two queens. Another with single uncapped QC mid frame.

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Ive been out today with a load of boxes to an Apiary that busting at the seems.

It was only 8 hives but what crackers.

All got a second box.

As soon as the weather comes right Id say another 100 will go out.

Inspecting my Formic acid treatment was interesting.

The one treatment bag that I brought home to weigh had shed 40 grams in 8 days on a meduim/ strong FD single.

This left 30 grams.

None of the treated hives I inspected have suffered any ill effects and are full new brood.

There was one that had to be different than the rest as there always is.

Its an aggressive mongrol, it wintered under very stressful circumstanses in a yard that got hammered by everything going (except AFB).

I shifted it to a spot all by itself where it couldnt cause any trouble.

Its a FD single and cramed packed with bees.

I put a large dose of Formic acid in it 9 days ago.

Half a slice of Oasis foam (8mm thick) containing 100grams of acid, wrapped in a plastic wrap.

Today all that was left was the plastic wrap.

Of all the hives opened today, it was the only one to have touched the foam.

I put the lid back on and stood there pondering the beast.

As the smoke wore off the bees line up along the full length of the entrance with just their heads poking out, looking at me.

Like a Battalion of Roman soldiers they positioned themselves

Then all at once they attacked.

I had ideas of making it a Queen Castle but ###### it, it would just be too uncomfortable.

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Finished scraping off surplus burr comb and propolis off my wets in the shed, and cleaning up boxes.

Split my first hive for the season. Queen, brood and nurse bees moved aside a couple of metres with syrup on top, leaving field bees with a frame of eggs in the original position. This hive was 2 three quarter boxes and one FD full of bees .

Hives being fed twice a week are building fast on syrup and gorse. First blueberries are flowering , so they are about to go crazy

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Was banned from bees today but did manage to sneak outside to the home hives. Went straight to a breeder hive where I expected to pull out a frame with a good amount of eggs in it, for grafting in the morning. The frame was full of nectar. The Q was nowhere to be seen in her three frame compartment, and one of the frames in that area had two Queen cells (not cups) underway. Went through the whole box twice with no sign of (my favourite) Q anywhere, but did find another two frames with Queen cells. Which goes to show I should have listened to my wife and stayed away from the bees.

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@Rob Stockley , you'll be interested to know the results from my after MAQS treatment follow up sugar shakes. Initial treatment was mid August.

 

All are a zero, except my problem hive that the varroa unexplainably numbers exploded back between the start of August and mid August. This hive is currently a 7 count, so got another treatment of MAQS today. I believe they are helping themselves to deadouts( not mine) and getting reinfested. This same hive was treated with Apivar a year ago, followed by MAQS as a follow up for the same reason. At the time, I thought the Apivar wasn't working, but I've sinced come to a new conclusion. I did another full AFB check as well, and they are clear, but definitely one to keep an eye on.

 

Saw my first spring emergency queen in a hive where the queen disappeared somewhere back in August. This hive had bad DWV, and still has the last of the brood emerging with it. They are 3 to 4 frames of bees, so had their hive reduced and a feeder put on top. I will treat with oxalic vapour, after the queen starts laying.

 

I'm seeing plenty of capped drone brood in a couple of strong hives that are 3 boxes high. I did my first spring split yesterday, and will split these two in about a weeks time.

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Went to an apiary today to check on 8 hives, all doing well with hives having 4 to 6 frames of brood and good numbers of bees, drones and drone brood appearing as well. A couple of hives were very low on food stores. Pollen stores have reduced considerably as more brood is being reared. Feeders on all but one hive and all received a pollen substitute patty. At my home apiary I checked a nucleus split from the 3 queen hive and now have 3 frames of capped brood 1 honey and 1 pollen/honey mix (I sold the other nuc last week). Main hive has 8 frames of brood with the queen starting to increase the brood band up in to the second brood box, third box is still full of honey stores, added another 500 gram pollen substitute patty between the brood boxes as pollen levels are quite low. Noticeable reduction in pollen coming in to hives over the past week. Pear and Plum trees at home are starting to have flower buds bursting. Hopefully this wintery blast passes by quickly and the flowers get pollinated.

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Previous record of grafts was 3 out of 6 by memory. Giving it a good go this year. Just checked my first graft for the year. Very pleased with myself with 18 out of 20 taken.

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Woohoo @Hannes that's awesome. We are a wee way away from Daleys magic queens yet, but no doubt it will happen in the next couple of weeks. Keep warm it's sounding like a cold 36 hours for you guys.

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image.jpeg.876e1497bb69a8e8b7be34227450740d.jpegA few days ago when the sun was out with the condor pump on the back

image.jpeg.19c441990c1efe79c1b1fd5c057503f7.jpeg Yesterday trying to get stuck , farmer said paddock was a bit soft but should be okay .

 

Trying to get the 1st round finished,

would be nice if the paddocks would dry out some.

Hives are bit of a mixed bag from needing 3rd box too 2 frames bees full of DWV . Can't use Bayvarol again.

image.jpeg.19c441990c1efe79c1b1fd5c057503f7.jpeg

image.jpeg.876e1497bb69a8e8b7be34227450740d.jpeg

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We putting in our 3rd round of cells into the starter today, with our first batch of cells hatching from yesterday onwards in our semi-urban placed mating nucs, though I'm not overly confident i will get good matings with these. Fingers cross there are plenty of hobbyist hives around pumping out mature healthy drones.

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We putting in our 3rd round of cells into the starter today, with our first batch of cells hatching from yesterday onwards in our semi-urban placed mating nucs, though I'm not overly confident i will get good matings with these. Fingers cross there are plenty of hobbyist hives around pumping out mature healthy drones.

Lets hope the Southern freezer thaws out quickly.

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I've not heard of Puriri being toxic to bees. Sure you're not thinking of Karaka ? I don't know when your Karaka flowers.

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