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Archive Collected Bees from tree Papatoetoe

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Hi, Today i ve collected some bees in a tree from Papatoetoe. I d like to share the pics and the experience I went there around 2 pm, and finished 5pm. When I was sitting next to entrance i could smell the strong honey smell. entrance was around 10 cm wide. [attachment=1580:name] the trunk was wet and soft so I was able to open a bigger entrance with a hammer and a knife [attachment=1581:name] the first lot [attachment=1582:name] and the second [attachment=1583:name]

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they liked their new home, the PP beehive :)[attachment=1584:name] I ve sealed the entrance and added a one way bee escape. [attachment=1585:name] I tried somethng new and tied the escape to a pipe through the beeescape that i had before. I put a pipe to keep it up and sealed it well. however it didnt work. well was worth to try :) [attachment=1586:name] took the pipe out and put the entrance of the hive next to escape. [attachment=1587:name] I ve left the doors of the hive open so they will go in. I will keep the hive there but i am not sure for how long. [attachment=1588:name] result, 5 stings, 3 from left hand (same finger), 1 from right hand and 1 from over my sock. guess what, i found out i am not allergic to the stings at all(y)

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before sealed the entrance i took a picture inside of the trunk. reminded the movie ALIEN :alien: [attachment=1589:name]

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Deniz, I hope you're going to band those combs into empty frames? If you leave it like that you're going to have a terrible mess, if they even survive.

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[quote name='deejaycee']Deniz, I hope you're going to band those combs into empty frames? If you leave it like that you're going to have a terrible mess, if they even survive.[/quote] Thanks I will do that asap

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Deniz, if you stretch elastic bands over some empty frames, (no foundation) you can slip the combs you have cut out into the frames and the bees will fix it in place for you. When they are fed up with the bands they chew them up and thow them out. Otherwise you'll have a nuisance on your hands, a lump of wild comb in the box.

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[quote="Dave Black, post: 9093, member: 219"]Deniz, if you stretch elastic bands over some empty frames, (no foundation) you can slip the combs you have cut out into the frames and the bees will fix it in place for you. When they are fed up with the bands they chew them up and thow them out. Otherwise you'll have a nuisance on your hands, a lump of wild comb in the box.[/quote] Thank you, i dont have any frame without foundation now, so i will separate them between the frames until i get some.

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What a cool adventure that was Deniz :-)

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[quote="Judy K, post: 9095, member: 55"]What a cool adventure that was Deniz :)[/quote] [FONT=Georgia][COLOR=#141414]I enjoyed all the moments of that 3 hours :geek:[/COLOR][/FONT]

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[quote="Dave Black, post: 9093, member: 219"]Deniz, if you stretch elastic bands over some empty frames, (no foundation) you can slip the combs you have cut out into the frames and the bees will fix it in place for you. When they are fed up with the bands they chew them up and thow them out. Otherwise you'll have a nuisance on your hands, a lump of wild comb in the box.[/quote] Dave, could u tell me how many days do i got to put them to empty frames?

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[quote name='Deniz']Thank you, i dont have any frame without foundation now, so i will separate them between the frames until i get some.[/quote] Don't do that - they need to be able to cluster on the brood to keep it warm and they won't be able to do that sandwiched between foundationed frames. Cut the foundation out of two or three of your existing frames and get them rubber banded/ tied in with string urgently. It's only a matter of a couple of dollars for a frame and foundation. Unfortunately, from the photo I suspect you don't have enough bees in there to cover the brood currently - even the brood they can access - you might find tomorrow is too late and the brood has chilled and died. it's hard to tell just how much of the hive is remaining in the tree. Do you have any idea if you got the queen? For a standard trapout (not a cutout) you'd probably be looking at close to six weeks minimum in place to finish the job - maybe longer. You're going to have to replace that cardboard with wood - they'll chew through the card anywhere they can get a grip on it.

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I'm sure dansar has some images with comb being put into frames using an elastic band.

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I tied it in with garden string (wasnt the smartest that day to think of rubber bands:what:) I transfered 5 combs of brood and honey stores in February, the hive really started hitting a good population end of April.. ready to slow down for winter. Deniz I will be supprised if they make it through winter. It would have been better to leave them in the tree until spring and then do the cut out.

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This is what the frames looked like with comb tied in. [attachment=1590:name]

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[quote name='deejaycee']Don't do that - they need to be able to cluster on the brood to keep it warm and they won't be able to do that sandwiched between foundationed frames. Cut the foundation out of two or three of your existing frames and get them rubber banded/ tied in with string urgently. It's only a matter of a couple of dollars for a frame and foundation. Unfortunately, from the photo I suspect you don't have enough bees in there to cover the brood currently - even the brood they can access - you might find tomorrow is too late and the brood has chilled and died. it's hard to tell just how much of the hive is remaining in the tree. Do you have any idea if you got the queen? For a standard trapout (not a cutout) you'd probably be looking at close to six weeks minimum in place to finish the job - maybe longer. You're going to have to replace that cardboard with wood - they'll chew through the card anywhere they can get a grip on it.[/quote] After read ur message I run to the place, and put them in a cardboard box which i hope will keep them warm through the night. and tomorrow i am doing the frames. thank you for your quick advice. however i felt very bad after read your message.

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[quote name='dansar']I tied it in with garden string (wasnt the smartest that day to think of rubber bands:what:) I transfered 5 combs of brood and honey stores in February, the hive really started hitting a good population end of April.. ready to slow down for winter. Deniz I will be supprised if they make it through winter. It would have been better to leave them in the tree until spring and then do the cut out.[/quote] Dansar, I ve already cut the combs and transferred to the hive. from now on I will have a keen eye on them. and fingers cross :unsure:

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:( Sorry Deniz.. really didn't want to make you feel bad, but yeah, this could have been done better.. or preferably not done at this time of year at all. I don't think they've got much chance of making it - for a number of reasons. but look, you'll do it better next time. and because of this thread maybe others will go into cutouts more prepared as well. So in terms of future learning.. points I would do differently: Don't do a cutout this time of year - unless the bees are causing a public nuisance and absolutely have to go, in which case they'll at least have a better chance of surviving than if they were sprayed out with pesticide. By this time of year, I mean several things: [LIST] [*]Any time after the bees stop drawing foundation - that's a sign their comb drawing ability is receding for the season, and they won't be able to easily draw comb to establish a new hive. [*]Any time it is cold enough for them to cluster overnight. Over the season the bees have organised their broodnest in a condensed shape that they can cover readily and maintain a thermal mass around. When cut out the broodnest is re-arranged and the result will be chilled and dead brood. [*]Any time around/after the drones have been booted out - there are high odds of killing the queen with this operation, and they won't have the resources to get a new queen mated. [/LIST] If you are close to the fringes of the above, you can help them succeed by providing drawn comb, so they can focus on brood and food instead of building. Foundation takes a lot of work to draw. Either do a cutout or a trapout, but not half of each. The result, unless it's a large colony, is likely to be not enough cover somewhere. Again, Deniz, please don't be upset.. it's all just a big learning curve.

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Deejaycee, I am not upset because of your message, I am upset because of the fact that they may die because of my action. I will put the combs to open frames tomorrow, and i hope i will have a chance to look for the queen. I hope she is in my hive now. If not i am thinking to get a new queen, do you think is that possible, to introduce a new queen if she is not there or shall I wait 6 weeks? also can you explain me your below sentence a bit more please? "you can help them succeed by providing drawn comb, so they can focus on brood and food instead of building. Foundation takes a lot of work to draw"

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Just that if you are able to give them drawn comb, then they can immediately lay and put stores in it, whereas if you give them foundation it has to be drawn out before they can even use it - and at this time of the year they just can't do it. Hopefully you have got her in there. If not.. well, I can only go by the photo you've put up, which looks like a maximum of half a frame of bees between the frames to the top of the cutout comb? Just not enough bees to establish a hive.. even at the right time of the year that would be an real stretch.. you'd be better to either combine the bees with an existing hive, or drop them in a freezer and call the job done.

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Good advice from DJC there. Deniz, if have been lucky at best you have a very small nuc. It is posible to over-winter a nuc, so the only thing I'd add is treat it like a nuc, it needs to be in a small insulated box, maybe in a shed with a flight-hole, or positioned on/in a big colony. Keep a careful eye on it, you may have to feed it candy. At some point though you have to decide if it's worth it.

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Today i moved the combs to the open frames. 1 full and 4 more then half frame I got. I Saw the Queen as well. she seems to be laying eggs in one of the combs, is that possible? I couldnt take any picture as it was a bit sticky job. I added 6 more frames and still keep the hive in the cardboard

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a few more pics of yesterday [attachment=1592:name] [attachment=1593:name]

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Deniz the advise to treat it like a nuc is very sound. You could minimise the area of your PP hive to 2 or 3 frames with the comb tied in. Keep them in a warmish place (garage) with a entrance/exit out the wall, make it 150mm maximum in length. You will need to set up a feeder of some description to see them through the winter (I think you have some product you can use;)). Of course you will need to have the queen in there too. Possibly little chance of successfully introducing a new queen this time of the year. Please keep us informed if the make it through the winter.

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Dansar, how would it help me if I minimise the area? The empty frames still work like some sort of insulation? I spotted the queen, luckily she was not dead during the operation. and u recomend the gate should face the wall not the garage door? thanks, will keep informed.

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I had a chance to check the varro levels from a comb. i opened 20 cells and found 4 varro. [attachment=1599:name]

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