Jump to content

Newbeek looking for advice/reassurance in ChCh


Recommended Posts

Hi team,

 

Did my first inspection today, in light of all the online activity suggesting it was time to crack the lid.

 

I found

 

3-4 frame ball of bees around empty frames. Some half emerged brood etc, but no capped brood. It was chilly & a cool breeze so as soon as I saw my queen I stopped. So no eggs seen but thats ok?

 

I did see lots of DWV so have started weekly Oxalic, and I'll re-inspect in 2 weeks. I'm not doing a mite count (there was not that many bees) and with signs of mite syndrome I thought I'd treat anyway.

 

On the good side, queen seen. And lots of capped honey (6 full frames) so I've taken off the feeder. And with lots of lay space I've not put on a top box.

 

My first question;

 

1. Suggestions?

2. Any other Canterbury people finding hive in winter mode still (it has finally arrived)? Or am I actually seeing a weak varoa newbee overwintered hive?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 16
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Would you mind telling us your varroa management from December onwards ?

 

Thanks.

 

I did 5 weeks of weekly oxalic acid treatment. And mite counts dropped from 13 to 6/300. No sign of DWV and good reserves going into winter. Still good reserves as I did feed occasionally when it was warm & bees active

Link to post
Share on other sites
Some half emerged brood etc, but no capped brood.

Do you mean half in, half out of the cells? Like kind of not quite emerged? Possibly dead? Regardless, 6/300 is too many going into a mild winter. If there really is no capped brood then Oxalic alone might save it. However, you must confirm that it is working. A sugar shake will not kill the bees - varroa definitely will. So get sampling.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you mean half in, half out of the cells? Like kind of not quite emerged? Possibly dead? Regardless, 6/300 is too many going into a mild winter. If there really is no capped brood then Oxalic alone might save it. However, you must confirm that it is working. A sugar shake will not kill the bees - varroa definitely will. So get sampling.

 

Yeah, fully formed but not emerging. Not a lot but fairly obvious since the rest were empty.

 

Next warm day I'll sample and get a baseline. Regardless I'll do a full treatment.

 

Considering the mild winter, should I have been treating through it, especially with a new late season hive?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Considering the mild winter, should I have been treating through it, especially with a new late season hive?

Yes, from what you are saying.

I've taken to doing a mid winter sugar shake and take action if needed. More hives have got through the winter that way

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, fully formed but not emerging. Not a lot but fairly obvious since the rest were empty.

Sounds like PMS. There will be a shortage of nurse bees and the colony is likely headed for collapse.

 

Do you have another strong hive? It would have to be very strong and capable of losing a frame of emerging brood? That's a tall order at this time of year. If you can eliminate the mites and introduce heathy young bees then the queen might start laying again and the colony might be saved.

 

That's a lot of mights, and here's one more. It might also be to late :confused:. Either way please report back what happens. Good luck.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Sounds like PMS. There will be a shortage of nurse bees and the colony is likely headed for collapse.

 

Do you have another strong hive? It would have to be very strong and capable of losing a frame of emerging brood? That's a tall order at this time of year. If you can eliminate the mites and introduce heathy young bees then the queen might start laying again and the colony might be saved.

 

That's a lot of mights, and here's one more. It might also be to late :confused:. Either way please report back what happens. Good luck.

Thanks, I think you're right with all your mights. Sadly this is my first and only hive. I have no other hives to draw from or combine too, I was planning on a split this year to get that buffer. Will update as I go :sick:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is 2-3% mite count really that bad? I realise I've been duped this winter, it's been ridiculously warm this winter in ChCh and I should have done check counts to ensure I was ahead of the curve. It's now cold.

 

I guess I was in a false sense of security with good numbers of bees out'n'about on sunny days and even today before opening the hive the girls were flying despite the cold breeze, and returning with pollen on their legs.

 

I'll watch out for a swarm, and start learning how I'm going to catch one. But I don't really have the time to be "on call" to grab one, so may have to try again and buy some more bees.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, I think you're right with all your mights. Sadly this is my first and only hive. I have no other hives to draw from or combine too, I was planning on a split this year to get that buffer. Will update as I go :sick:

I have been in your situation.

As a beginner I thought I only needed 1 hive.

I realise now I need at least 3 to cover my self.

I had 2 the first winter and only one made it through , then it swarmed

Link to post
Share on other sites

With lots of honey reserves I'm guessing feeding 1:1 syrup isn't going to help stimulate some laying like I've read about, or will it? I'm going to persevere and cross my fingers.... and order another set of hive gear to start number 2 this season.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
With lots of honey reserves I'm guessing feeding 1:1 syrup isn't going to help stimulate some laying like I've read about, or will it? I'm going to persevere and cross my fingers.... and order another set of hive gear to start number 2 this season.

Feeding will stimulate the queen to lay more, even with honey stores. The stores have nothing to do with how much the queen lays. They are food in the bank . Feeding syrup mimics a nectar flow, which increases the laying

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Feeding will stimulate the queen to lay more, even with honey stores. The stores have nothing to do with how much the queen lays. They are food in the bank . Feeding syrup mimics a nectar flow, which increases the laying

Thanks Matt, I'll get onto it tomorrow and get that feeder going again with 1:1.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you mean half in, half out of the cells? Like kind of not quite emerged? Possibly dead? Regardless, 6/300 is too many going into a mild winter. If there really is no capped brood then Oxalic alone might save it. However, you must confirm that it is working. A sugar shake will not kill the bees - varroa definitely will. So get sampling.

I've taken your advice Rob, and sugar shaked today. 27 out of a best guess 200bees (I couldn't fill the jar there are so few left).

 

Done another oxalic treatment today.

 

Checked a whole lot of sunken cells and chewed cells and brood in an assortment of phases. Nothing that resembles AFB, but I will get this double checked with a DECA approved inspection.

 

I'm now feeding 1:1 syrup in the hope I get some queen stimulation and laying again.

 

The hive remains settled and the bees are flying in this sunny Saturday with pollen returning and still some pollen stores in the frames.

 

Fingers remain firmly crossed

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...