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Bee health/Colony Loss Survey Results


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I couldn't understand the graphs so it was meaningless to me

Same, and with that I have decided to give the next survey, 'announced' with the link to the indecipherable graphs, a miss. Really, what's the point of me going through my notes, collecting data just to be presented with pages full of mumbo jumbo?

Anybody on this forum here from Landcare actually taking notes on how their 'research' is received?

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I have to agree with Dennis. Yes, there is much to fault in the coloss survey, but in these days of 'big data' we now have the possibility of managing vast amounts of information. Admittedly much of this data is speculative but if enough conscientious beekeepers get involved the quality will improve. And yes, the results are hard to analyse, but this link on reading a histogram will help Interpreting the results | Survey of Bee Colony Loss & Survival | Landcare Research

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What a load of rubbish in most of the above posts, there is a lot of info in this survey. Take the time to read it.

Why do you always want someone to hold your hand while you wipe your bum.

 

well you obviously know how to interpret the graphs why not give us all a run down on how to read them? You could wipe my bum and walk me through this one,

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On each graph, the two axis are a percentage, the bottom the number of hives broken into 10% increments the left side the % of beekeepers. The curve is the average, where the peak of the curve line (read from the bottom %)is the percentage of beekeepers to do what ever the title of graph is discussing. In your example in the top graph "Share of nucs/splits/tops lost over winter 2015"

Those with 51-250 hives, approx 22% beeks lost 10% of their nucs/s/t, and the average beek with 51-250 hives lost 40% of there n/s/t.

Those with 1001-3000, approx 35% lost 20% of their n/s/t and the average beek with 1001-3000 lost 18% of their n/s/t.

Now to go wash my hands.

 

If you have a wet day take the time to read the graphs, you can see where your business fits in or benched marked against others. I didn't participate in this survey but will for the next one, and encourage everyone to do the same. With more info we can get a really good picture of what is happening (within certain parameters) within the industry commercial and hobbyist alike. And all we have to do is keep a few notes.

 

Heck Frazz Ive come back for more wiping, Im assuming you are in the top of the South Island, if you look down the page you will see in the top of the south the average beek with 250+ hives lost 18% of there n/s/t, in the BOP it is 22%. In the BOP 20% of beeks lost betwen 20-30% of n/s/t and the top of the south only maybe 12% lost 20-30%. And then you can check as to what the many causes of death are and so on.

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Thanks for the explanation Dennis.

I still don't understand the graphs but then I'm useless at anything that looks like maths. I was regularly smacked over the knuckles with the yard stick by my teacher he thought I was a hopeless case too.

 

I guess that's why I'm a beekeeper, the bees don't care if I can do maths or not :)

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Thanks for the explanation Dennis.

I still don't understand the graphs but then I'm useless at anything that looks like maths. I was regularly smacked over the knuckles with the yard stick by my teacher he thought I was a hopeless case too.

 

I guess that's why I'm a beekeeper, the bees don't care if I can do maths or not :)

Your skepticism about the survey is well founded Frazz, but my point is that, if enough beekeepers got into it seriously their observational skills (ie the forensics of deadouts) would improve and we would end up with more accurate information. The survey may throw up patterns of loss as to region, varroa treatment, and land use that could tell us something really useful. Ever the bone-headed optimist.

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I just wish they could report back in a more user friendly way, I'm sure I'm not the only one that can't get their head around those kinds of graphs

Not an unreasonable expectation considering that most scientific types have had to do a paper while at uni on presenting information in an appropriate way...

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Most people don't need or want to know how to interpret a histogram. These guys will not win any science communication awards.

This is a really useful project but it needs to spend some effort on presenting its results. People like me spend our days interpreting strangely-presented data and trying to decode it for lay people. But I can't be bothered doing it if I'm not getting paid.

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And for me @Janice if I Have to take time from my day to learn how to interpret a graph I'm not going to bother. Surely there's a simple way with a simple graph or something similar that is user friendly.

 

If the powers that be can't take the time to be sure the results are easily understood Im not going to take the time to send information in.

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And for me @Janice if I Have to take time from my day to learn how to interpret a graph I'm not going to bother. Surely there's a simple way with a simple graph or something similar that is user friendly.

 

If the powers that be can't take the time to be sure the results are easily understood Im not going to take the time to send information in.

Not picking on you Frazz, here is an example of what happened in land farming a couple of decades ago. Farmers had to come along kicking and screaming to learn to farm the modern way, kg of matter per hectare, grazing levels, fertiliser usage, feed ratios per stocking unit etc etc. Times are changing, it's hard to keep up. We need to keep up. Where we don't understand something we educate ourselves no matter how difficult it is.

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Farmers had to come along kicking and screaming to learn to farm the modern way, kg of matter per hectare, grazing levels, fertiliser usage, feed ratios per stocking unit etc etc.

Only the greedy ######s who either bit off nearly more than they could chew, or who couldn't live without a new Landrover every other year.

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@dansar I have to disagree, nothing I do in beekeeping needs me to understand graphs.

It's like saying those putting out these graphs should know all about beekeeping, they don't, but if they came to see me I could explain what I do in an easy to understand way or I could make it difficult.

 

If I Wanted their help I would explain it in a way that Brought them on board and got them enthusiastic if I didn't want their help I would make it difficult.

 

These graphs have made it difficult, for me.

 

Is there no other way the information could have been published?

Or am I the only one who has a problem understanding.

If it's just me then that's my problem.

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those histograms are a bit of a head scratcher.

the other graphs are ok.

 

but keep in mind that the info is only as good as the people reporting.

theres a few bits that i'm suspicious of.

as its very easy, and often done, to write off a hive death as something else.

i suspect probably whats happened is different interpretations of the question, so people give different answers. which will skew the results a fair bit.

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We were all about ten when they taught us at school that graphs need description on the axis and headings etc. I also thought this information was very poorly presented - I didn't understand it until one of the posters explained it. In the absence of properly presented graphs they could have also prepared a one or two paragraph summary on each area for easy reading.

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@frazzledfozzle think of the green bars as express queues in a supermarket. In this example all the beeks with 501-1000 hives were shopping. The first queue is only for beeks who suffered 10% losses. The second 20%. Third 30% and so on. The peak in the curved line indicates in which queue the beek with the average loss is standing. In this case around the 20% mark. So if this was your time to shop and you were in the 10% queue then good for you. If you were in the 40% queue then you might look at your operation and figure out why you're doing worse than others in your category.

 

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