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Should I feed my bees?


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Hello people..

 

Its been around 7 weeks since I have inspected my Hive due to working over Vintage in the Winery. I have moved the hive so that it will get the winter sun longer and are considering feeding the bees for the next few weeks. Last time I checked the second super 7 weeks ago it was 90 percent full and capped with honey. So my question is if the hive's second super is fully capped of honey can I still feed the bees and for how long? Also I am still noticing drone bees being evicted out of the hive and what it looks like to me young bees being thrown out as well.

 

Cheers Tony.

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So my question is if the hive's second super is fully capped of honey can I still feed the bees and for how long?

 

Tony, Do you really mean 2nd super or are you referring to what is currently a 2 box hive (including brood) ?

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Hi Grant

 

I have a 2nd super with no brood just capped honey with my bottom super being brood.

 

sorry was typing and just seen your answer, if you are describing what i think, what you have is called your second brood box if you have no queen excluder between them? If you have one full box off honey on top of your brood you will not have to feed just leave them be, as long as you have done your treatment.

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I am assuming that on your last inspection you did a check for AFB before removing any honey supers. You will need to urgently do an autum treatment or your bees will probably not last the winter. Make sure you use an alternative to the type of treatment you used in spring.

 

If you have 1 brood box and an excluder then a box of honey, the top one will be termed a super (full of honey) then you need only treat the bottom box which is a brood box. This will be your priority as they will feed from the full honey super.

 

You can recheck the situation when you do another inspection as you remove the strips in x number of weeks time. The problem is, this will be in the depths of winter because you are so late, so you may run into trouble finding an inspection time.

 

Bear in mind you may need to use something strong if your hive is showing signs of varroa infestation (which it most likely will) so you may want to consider something that will give a quick knockdown.

 

There are a lot of assumptions in my comments due to the lack of information, but lets see what you come back with. Do you know what to look for in terms of brood/disease signs of stress etc?

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Hey

 

Thanks for the advice... I check the Hive yesterday and found signs of Varroa so put in two strips of Bayvoral. Prior to that I inspected of the Hive, the bees seem to look ok. The Queen is looking good and found little signs of stress and wingless bees. I did though, notice brood cells are fewer than the last time I inspected the Hive, not sure what it means maybe the queen is not laying a per normal and that she is wintering down?

 

Cheers

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Bayvarol requires 4 strips for each box of brood. They need to be placed where they will achieve maximum contact with bees. Laying may have dropped due to weather yes.

 

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