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We have a polaris ranger on farm and its brilliant in the wet . Plenty of room for gear on the back , pretty good on steep stuff , only vice is it tends to freewheel down hill . Has a winch on front , so approaching dodgy spots , one tends to "give it a go" rather than bailing out . I would think loading and unloading an atv off a trailer would beat dealing with muddy chains . From a making a mess point of veiw , if it's muddy/ boggy then weight is your enemy , so personally i would rather go with a light atv . If the surface is firm and slippery , your chains could come into there own . I still have nightmares from years gone by , spreading fert on the hills in autumn . Hard dry ground covered with lush clover after autumn rain ! As I get older I tend to think twice before tackling marginal stuff .

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But not so many safe sensible ones !

 

Exactly what I was thinking!

I'm very risk averse and I would be walking it, with buckets of syrup if I had too.

Too easy to come to grief on a hill in slippery conditions it's just not worth the risk for me.

Hopefully next year that site will be shifted after the flow so you don't have the same dilemma.

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Exactly what I was thinking!

I'm very risk averse and I would be walking it, with buckets of syrup if I had too.

Too easy to come to grief on a hill in slippery conditions it's just not worth the risk for me.

Hopefully next year that site will be shifted after the flow so you don't have the same dilemma.

Walking carrying weight over rough ground is a risk too....

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Hmm what would I rather have , a sprained ankle or a rollover and broken neck?

Getting out of bed in the morning can be risky but I will take my chances :)

Last time I walked into a site I carried a 20l if syrup in each hand and a third in a backpack... That was a bad idea... Lol

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I've used chains on a variety of vehicles, from quads, light 4wds, heavy 4wds (10t+), 6wd trucks and even 24t eight wheel drive vehicles. I would defeinitly second the notion that chains should be used as a last resort to get you out - not get you in. As has been mentioned already, once you are stuck with chains on, you are stucker than stuck!

 

A few tips I've picked up along the way though:

-Always put the chains on before you think you'll need them - there is nothing worse than trying to fit them diff-deep in mud.

-Carry a couple of small blocks of wood - 4x2 is fine, cut the length to match the width of the tyre. You drive up on the blocks, fit the chains, and don't have to worry about driving forward or back to tension them as the tyre is off the ground and the chains fit around the wood.

-Make sure the chains are as absolutely tight as you can get them. You won't see many bigger tears from a man as he stands to the side of his truck looking at where a loose chain has torn the inner guard/quarter panel/brake lines apart.

-Ensure that you have the turning clearance if fitting chains to the front wheels - see above comment re tears if you don't check first.

-Don't drive fast - sounds obviously, but you'd be surprised... things come loose, and then we have the tears again.

-Chains need the wheels to be turning in order to work - again, sounds obvious, however people get excited coming down hills and end up with either too much brake or, if it's really slippery, too much engine brake. As counter-intuitive as it sounds, you need to give it a little gas to get the wheels to turn in order to gain traction again. More importanatly is knowing when to do this. Find a slippery paddock with a good run-off and practice before you need to.

-Snow chains for ski-bunnies aren't worth the packet they come in if used off road. The chain gauge is too light and does 3/8ths of ###### all.

Having used both ladder and diamond chains, there are some subtle differences as mentioned earlier in regards to steering and grip. Ladders will climb straight up much better - the gap between each ladder provides space to allow more of the vehicle weight to bear down on the cross-chain. Conversely, you may still slide sideways slightly in the gap - wheel rotation will help prevent this though. That said, it's always a bad idea to be turning on a slope.

 

Food for thought I hope.

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I've used chains on a variety of vehicles, from quads, light 4wds, heavy 4wds (10t+), 6wd trucks and even 24t eight wheel drive vehicles. I would defeinitly second the notion that chains should be used as a last resort to get you out - not get you in. As has been mentioned already, once you are stuck with chains on, you are stucker than stuck!

 

A few tips I've picked up along the way though:

-Always put the chains on before you think you'll need them - there is nothing worse than trying to fit them diff-deep in mud.

-Carry a couple of small blocks of wood - 4x2 is fine, cut the length to match the width of the tyre. You drive up on the blocks, fit the chains, and don't have to worry about driving forward or back to tension them as the tyre is off the ground and the chains fit around the wood.

-Make sure the chains are as absolutely tight as you can get them. You won't see many bigger tears from a man as he stands to the side of his truck looking at where a loose chain has torn the inner guard/quarter panel/brake lines apart.

-Ensure that you have the turning clearance if fitting chains to the front wheels - see above comment re tears if you don't check first.

-Don't drive fast - sounds obviously, but you'd be surprised... things come loose, and then we have the tears again.

-Chains need the wheels to be turning in order to work - again, sounds obvious, however people get excited coming down hills and end up with either too much brake or, if it's really slippery, too much engine brake. As counter-intuitive as it sounds, you need to give it a little gas to get the wheels to turn in order to gain traction again. More importanatly is knowing when to do this. Find a slippery paddock with a good run-off and practice before you need to.

-Snow chains for ski-bunnies aren't worth the packet they come in if used off road. The chain gauge is too light and does 3/8ths of ###### all.

Having used both ladder and diamond chains, there are some subtle differences as mentioned earlier in regards to steering and grip. Ladders will climb straight up much better - the gap between each ladder provides space to allow more of the vehicle weight to bear down on the cross-chain. Conversely, you may still slide sideways slightly in the gap - wheel rotation will help prevent this though. That said, it's always a bad idea to be turning on a slope.

 

Food for thought I hope.

Brilliant advice thanks much appreciated.

 

So with all of the above taken into account, I've done two things;

 

1) secured use of a quad bike to get me in to these hives through winter/spring.

 

2) purchased single set heavy duty ladder chains with cleats to get the cruiser out should I get stuck on other occasions.

 

Thanks again to all of you.

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I should also say make sure there is room round any abs sensors and the like I know a lot of new Utes can't have chains on the front wheels and new parts for BT50s are very expensive think weed whacker on crack

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I should also say make sure there is room round any abs sensors and the like I know a lot of new Utes can't have chains on the front wheels and new parts for BT50s are very expensive think weed whacker on crack

good point.

some utes you cannot fit front chains on.

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I have ATs on the landcruiser as 90% of my work is on tarseal and metal country roads, they are pretty usless off road unless its as dry as a bone. Even if there's been a heavy dew I put the ladder chains on for the paddocks and muddy bush tracks. It allows me to keep the speed down and not wreck the truck or the load, everything happens nice and slow and you get in and get out. The last few weeks however have been very wet in my part of northland and the paddocks and bush tracks have turned to mud and slush. Whether I'm going up or down I have to keep steering for the bank to keep it all on the track. More than a few white knuckle moments !! Next winter it will be a SBS for the wet.

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We have a set of 4 heavy duty Quik Grip mud/snow/ice ladder chains with ice breaker lugs, brought for our landcruiser that we no longer have. We used to carry them when doing hard out 4 x 4 trips for recreational use. They did get us out of the mud/ice once or twice in an emergency when the diff locks wouldn't do the trick . Will put them up on buy/sell page

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Just had to break out the chains for real! Was feeding out (small window of opportunity) and a nasty dose of rain and hail came down out of nowhere. (Been windy but sunny morning) and driving out the ute broke traction and couldn't get up the hill in the exact spot I had trouble last year. So went back down to the bottom, put on the chains and let down the rear with my arb deflator and crawled up the hill without any worries! Super stoked with my gear improvements from last year!

 

Safe n sound

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20160715_134431.jpg.1721aa3c2969bb5bc7f16ba4776fbf20.jpg

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