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I find myself in the embarrassing situation of having a few hives in what has recently become a somewhat inaccessible site due to wet weather (no thanks to having a crane in pieces and waiting weeks for parts from Italy....grrr....another story).

 

Two options I guess - they stay where they are for winter and I walk in to them. But of course that's a little too easy (and sensible) so I'm looking at the second option - purchasing mud chains for the land cruiser.

 

The ground I am dealing with is hard packed slippery clay slope with a small amount (mostly 10-20mm) of grass or slushy mud on top. I've tried narrow tyres to bite through which didn't work and the fat mud tyres are no better it turns out. Hence the chains, the thought being that if I can bite through and into the hard clay, I should be able to crawl up the slope and out. I don't have far to go - only maybe 100m before I'm back on hard track.

 

So my question - what make of chain and what pattern? Have been researching online and in this forum, but would appreciate any practical experience from beeks. Some say diamond pattern best as stops any sideways movement, others say ladder pattern better for biting into mud. I'll only need them for occasional use in mud, no snow issues where I am.

 

Would appreciate any comments, I know a few on the forum have commented before so obviously have some experience.

 

Thanks

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I had a few years with a difficult access track, mud and semi hard Papa base. Ladder pattern was excellent for grip. I looked at chains recently (pricey these days!) and was disappointed with the gauge/weight of chain. That would be my issue, try to get a very hefty gauge of chain to give you the bite needed, the lighter weights I viewed seemed a waste of time to me. Clearing the clay from the chains/wheels may still be a problem though as you travel.

Have seen a set (in use) with a bar welded to the cross tread section (ladder rung?)of the chain which were very effective (exceptionally!) but hell on the vehicle. Ok for a short stretch then get them off again. Have used similar myself on a bike in the past with great traction but a hellish ride too.

Am faced with a similar location presently, just the last 100 metres, am going to try better tyres but will walk it for now. Another 2 months and It will be ok again I hope.

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inaccessible hives is much the norm around here in winter.

hard clay base with slush on top is probably one the most dangerous to drive on. you might as well be driving on ice.

 

chains with cleats is about the only thing thats going to bite into it.

quad bike or SBS would be better depending on how slushy it is.

 

but the best is to simply leave the hives alone. its winter, if you have done your prep right they don't need looking after.

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Or perhaps drive as close as possible to the hive and use a winch to pull the cruiser to and from the hive. Just need a strong tree.

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Or perhaps drive as close as possible to the hive and use a winch to pull the cruiser to and from the hive. Just need a strong tree.

don't forget you need to winch it back out again.

probably quicker to walk it than winch both ways.

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I have light truck chains for the Hilux ladder ones with cleats don't buy snow chains they just won't last but I only put them on to go home if I need them in the mud I'll walk if you get stuck with them on man are you stuck

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I got some mud chains made by snowsweat.co.nz via repco. They originally made up the light chain version(not what I asked for) but I didn't like the look of them at all and got them to make up the heavy chains I originally ordered. Had them made custom for my tyre size. I have not had to use them yet but I'm 100% confident they will be awesome. I got the diamond pattern and it does have straight across (ladders) as well. I got them cause this time last year I got caught out climbing up and around a hill and got a sideways downhill slip goin towards a drop off....not cool

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Make your own out of whatever chain grabs your fancy. Bolt cutters/small angle grinder, couple of handfuls of shackles & bungies.

Very simple. Don't need to be fantastically engineered for the odd paddock.

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My mistake, just the diamond pattern. Threw it over a wheel for a pic. Still a bit shiny thou lol

20160701_132851.jpg.b09cad6f0907a7e327adecfba69e0bdc.jpg

20160701_132851.jpg.b09cad6f0907a7e327adecfba69e0bdc.jpg

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thanks for all the replies

 

 

borrow a quad bike n trailer

Funny you say that Dennis, I'm trying to use the situation to justify buying my own one, a conversation that has not gone well so far :D

 

But yes, you are right, better idea than walking. Although I'm nervous about taking a trailer on the bike, as it is very steep and the last thing I want is something heavy pushing the bike and I downhill...

 

 

 

but the best is to simply leave the hives alone. its winter, if you have done your prep right they don't need looking after.

 

Yes, these hives are well set up, so no problem through winter. It is spring that is the issue, as this site may not dry out enough to get the land cruiser back in until as late as November. Which means all those spring visits, feeding, varroa treatment, supering are all going to be a challenge

 

 

Make your own out of whatever chain grabs your fancy. Bolt cutters/small angle grinder, couple of handfuls of shackles & bungies.

Very simple. Don't need to be fantastically engineered for the odd paddock.

 

You're obviously more handy than I. I like the sound of buying the basic chains then adding cleats though, so think I'll go that way.

 

@glynn , @tristan , @Danman and @Ali , thanks for the chain info and the photo Danman.

 

@glynn , any chance you could post a photo of the cleats on your ones?

 

 

Or perhaps drive as close as possible to the hive and use a winch to pull the cruiser to and from the hive. Just need a strong tree.

There are no trees up the slope unfortunately, just grass. Plenty of trees in the valley below me, but no way out down there!

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Although I'm nervous about taking a trailer on the bike, as it is very steep and the last thing I want is something heavy pushing the bike and I downhill...

don't need to tow a trailer with the bike. you can carry a fair bit on a bike.

 

as this site may not dry out enough to get the land cruiser back in until as late as November.

yeah thats is what we always struggle with.

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Long time ago I had snow chains, old fashioned heavy duty ones, which did get me out of the odd spot when stuck. So yes, they work. My gut is that diamond ones would work better, depends what type of substrate but if you are wanting to dig through the mud to the harder clay then diamond is probably the way.

 

One thing i learned and really why I don't have them now, they will make a heckuva mess of the paddock, your truck, and you.

 

If the problem area is only 100 meters, an alternative solution and something I have done on occasion, is drop a few truckloads of metal in a few strategic places.

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I got V-bar ladder chain for my landcruiser from chains.co.nz much better price than repco and they were very helpful

I was also trying to decide between the diamond style but with the vbar and the speeds we're talking about I'm happy I went with the v-bar

But my warning is if your stuck with chains your properly stuck and probably need to unload to get out and with all that weight on they'll just dig trenches

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I got my chains for 450 a pair but that was a mistake on their part on the original quote, should have been either 550 or 600 from memory for the 'mudcats' that I originally asked for. How much were they from chains.co.nz? Still got to get one more set at some point

 

Their studded chain looks pretty

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I got my chains for 450 a pair but that was a mistake on their part on the original quote, should have been either 550 or 600 from memory for the 'mudcats' that I originally asked for. How much were they from chains.co.nz? Still got to get one more set at some point

 

Their studded chain looks pretty

They do look very :x3:

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tmp_17540-IMG_20160702_161920-313726023.jpg.c64b1f1481e5e774cd075ce645a67eb0.jpg one's are called icebreakers the secret is to keep them as tight .

tmp_17540-IMG_20160702_161937317227228.jpg.2a1726236db28ece6652c97e080467f3.jpg

tmp_17540-IMG_20160702_161937317227228.jpg.2a1726236db28ece6652c97e080467f3.jpg

tmp_17540-IMG_20160702_161920-313726023.jpg.c64b1f1481e5e774cd075ce645a67eb0.jpg

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[ATTACH=full]14001[/ATTACH] My[ATTACH=full]14002[/ATTACH] one's are called icebreakers the secret is to keep them as tight .

Awesome thanks @glynn - are those " snowsweat icecats" ?

 

One thing I've wondered about is traction while turning - while on a steep slope I would think you would want to drive straight up and down slope, but on lesser slopes, turning could become important and still a problem on greasy clay. In that case, perhaps diamond pattern would be better than ladder on front wheels, even without cleats?

 

Starting to wonder whether icecats like Glynns on back wheels and diamond on front could be an option - traction plus turning control???

 

So many options...

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So many options...

But not so many safe sensible ones !

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@yesbut maybe I should get a pair of these

image.jpeg.28ba68d1e459a1bd18785de0194d4f4b.jpeg

image.jpeg.28ba68d1e459a1bd18785de0194d4f4b.jpeg

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I just realised I shouldn't have stuck my nose into this thread to start with, as a non-commercial..:thumbdown::thumbdown:

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Before getting too excited about hardware.

Most hive sites are on someone's land , do you have permission to make a huge mess of the hillside and does the landlord own a tractor to pull you out when you have buried your truck.

Do you have a run out for your 2 1/2 ton sled or will you be playing hive skittles.

We purchased a side by side last spring due to the wet to get round this kind of problem

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Before getting too excited about hardware.

Most hive sites are on someone's land , do you have permission to make a huge mess of the hillside and does the landlord own a tractor to pull you out when you have buried your truck.

Do you have a run out for your 2 1/2 ton sled or will you be playing hive skittles.

We purchased a side by side last spring due to the wet to get round this kind of problem

@Rob Atkinson yes and yes to the first 2 questions.

 

It is your point about the sled that has me nervous.

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@yesbut maybe I should get a pair of these

Havent you got your boots from your Magpies days?:rofl:

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