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Hiveware assembly jigs


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I am building a box assembly jig and I would like to ask the more experienced ones what size of toggle clamp to use(I want to use vertical toggle clamps). I have seen some on TM but the arm seems a bit too small/short ...???

 

3 x 100G TOGGLE CLAMPS

 

If the TM link expires here is a same clamp C100 | KL-12130 Vertical Toggle Clamp | For Sale East Tamaki - Auckland | Buy Workshop Equipment & Machinery online at machineryhouse.co.nz

 

The base of my jig will be a 30mm laminated MDF and the clamps will be screwed to the 30mm edge. The box(sides) will be raised 20mm-ish with free corners, so those arms may not reach the sides of the box properly.

 

Should I buy those clamps and modify them? Like attaching a piece of 17mm MDF or PLY(the size of a hand) to the arm of the clamp.

 

Those clamps with 150mm arm are $40-ish each.

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  • 8 months later...
Here is the video.

Hi Trev, nice video, and a great wee jig, will be making myself a jig this winter to keep boxes true and square.

Always difficult when the odd boxs dos'nt want to sit flush, worse for the bees, robbing,draughts etc.

 

Have been making supers with hammer and nail plus self tapping screws and would like to change to air copressed staple gun,

would you recommend the 16 gauge for other hiveware jobs like joining the timber corners of crown board.

 

Don't know much about these tools really, just want to increase speed without wacking my thumb regulary. cheers

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Have been making supers with hammer and nail plus self tapping screws and would like to change to air copressed staple gun,

would you recommend the 16 gauge for other hiveware jobs like joining the timber corners of crown board.

16 g or 15 gauge is great for boxes and floors.

18 g for frames and hive mats. However, 16 and 15 g are very expensive. 18 g will do the job but put in a few extra staples.

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Just watched vid on frame making, getting the theme now, tools,tools and more tools with variations of the same tools with accessories and attachments. Hardware stores must love beekeepers

Yes, there are always more tools to buy. Buy the best quality that you can afford and you will never regret it. Buy cheap and you will have to buy often.

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16 g or 15 gauge is great for boxes and floors.

18 g for frames and hive mats. However, 16 and 15 g are very expensive. 18 g will do the job but put in a few extra staples.

18g will do it but staple in both directions and be sure and use a good construction adhesive.

 

Sorry @Trevor Gillbanks you know that of course. This post meant for other readers.

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I use screws. Because I like spending money and it means if the screw isnt strait I can remove it cleanly and put ti back in. Plus staple/nail guns are noisy and I am not a massive fan of ear muffs or loud noises.....

I take it you're driving those screws with a drill and not a rattle gun then ?

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  • 1 month later...
This is not so much of an assembly jig, but you could probably guess what these are! The hard parts done, just have to watch the fingers on the next bit.

A mixture of pine and Mac.

[ATTACH=full]18006[/ATTACH]

Where's the video getting to that stage.

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just a small bit of my thumb nail gone and a small Nic in my index finger

It worries me that you appear to be firstly still doing this cutting in a dangerous manner and secondly you appear to be treating it lightly. I pay enough ACC levies as it is without you ratcheting up the cost ...

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It worries me that you appear to be firstly still doing this cutting in a dangerous manner and secondly you appear to be treating it lightly. I pay enough ACC levies as it is without you ratcheting up the cost ...

I try and be as safe as I can, it's safer without the use of gloves, I use an offcut peice of wood to push the block through and use two fingers to grab the other end, the 3/4 pieces are short, not allowing much room to grab the end, it's the up stroke of the blade that nicked me not the down part, I stay will away from the down part.

There are risks in everything you do, my worst injury I have ever had was tripping up in the garden and damaged a nerve in my leg, I'm still have pain now and I did it in March.

A combination of knowing the risks, being confident in what your doing is the approach I have, working as a panelbeater has more risks, ACC hit us hard to.

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I try and be as safe as I can, it's safer without the use of gloves, I use an offcut peice of wood to push the block through and use two fingers to grab the other end, the 3/4 pieces are short, not allowing much room to grab the end, it's the up stroke of the blade that nicked me not the down part, I stay will away from the down part.

There are risks in everything you do, my worst injury I have ever had was tripping up in the garden and damaged a nerve in my leg, I'm still have pain now and I did it in March.

A combination of knowing the risks, being confident in what your doing is the approach I have, working as a panelbeater has more risks, ACC hit us hard to.

If you have had two near misses on this small job you are doing something catastrophically wrong. And you should stop. Now. If a staff member had done this on my watch they would never be near a machine again.

 

Feel free to ignore my advice, I have cut thousands of bits of wood using a saw bench and have never had a near miss, finger injuries hurt like a #%$^& and dont heal properly.

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