Jump to content

Advice needed about varroa please!


Recommended Posts

If they were mine I'd be tempted to reverse the boxes & put the strips on top of the brood. As I recall the instructions say when treating a single storey hive to put another storey on top 'cos the bees tend to expand the cluster in response to the fumes. I wouldn't add any more ventilation. Pay attention to the instructions re temperature.

Very good advice in a months time, I am not sure about swapping them now....

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 105
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

http://nodglobal.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/US-M-PL-003.pdf this is an imperial version, your version is of course on your tub of the strips.

 

It is showing one strip for a single box. and two strips and discussing them. In your situation I think two strips on top of the bottom box looks right, with or without capped brood in the bottom box (so far as you know). The strips will still treat the box above in the two box case and so you are all set. The cloud of gas is enough to deal with a double brood box plus a super.

 

This is the NZ version:

 

http://www.aucklandbeekeepersclub.org.nz/UFresource/NZ_10_Dose_Full_Set.pdf

 

It says to add a third box (super) if you need to, I believe that if you are at the lower limit of 10C the extra box is unlikely compared to when it is 29C where the strips would fume off aggressively. Presumably under 10C they do not give off enough fumes to be effective in fact. Whereas above 29C they might give off too much and be too destructive. [just thinking aloud as to why they give these instructions].

 

1. I would try this with the strips on top of the bottom box. I would not switch around the boxes and I would not add a super. In regards to the treatment, I don't think it will matter and I don't think you should meddle with what the bees are doing in regards their choice of boxes.

2. all fine.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I done the MAQS treatment and have the results, I left the boxes as is, and put the strips between the two brood boxes, I put a board under the hive with upside down packaging tape wrapped around it to act as a stick board, and could not count the varroa after the 7 day period, there were to many! Maybe 1000+, the hive seems to be normal, still aggressive, but it was a cold day, so only took the strips out.

image.jpeg.551916cd74d9e53a9a8649092e4c403a.jpeg

image.jpeg.9fabbec184092c5105894919fcfe483a.jpeg

image.jpeg.20cd5fe0cc971783d3c8acf3076e47ef.jpeg

image.jpeg.9fabbec184092c5105894919fcfe483a.jpeg

image.jpeg.20cd5fe0cc971783d3c8acf3076e47ef.jpeg

image.jpeg.551916cd74d9e53a9a8649092e4c403a.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
but it was a cold day, so only took the strips out.

 

great result. Taking the maqs out was totally fine but also optional. Owing to the fact you had mites up the wazoo, and since it was a cold day, I would have left the MAQS in there not opened the hive and given them first OA treament then and there. On the basis the maqs is now spent anyway and because of the cold you couldn't do a sugar shake to prove that the OA wasn't necessary. Probably the mite count is severely depleted but still above the trigger level for treating. If it is a flying day on next visit then maybe it is possible to do a sugar shake to find out where you are. If it is still too cold then I'd propose to launch into weekly OA treatment until you have a flying day where you could do a sugar shake. If you get to the point where no mites are falling after 4 weeks of treatment then you could have a think at that point.

 

I hope that makes sense. I wrote it thinking about what I would attempt to do in your position.

I'll be interested to hear what others recommend and how it works out on your future visits.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Reasoning ?

 

Well I've read plenty of comments from contributors to this forum that with a very high mite count, that treating may only improve things to become 50/50 that the colony will survive; any kind of treatment.

 

With regards to maqs, I've read efficacy statements about maqs being 90 percent. So, for every 1000 mites that fell out dead then another 111 mites could still be in there. Unless/until a sugar shake (or alcohol wash or whatever you prefer) is done, we don't really know what is the mite count still in this hive. Given that it has been cold and at the lower end of the 10C limit for maqs, nobody can be totally sure what the efficacy of that particular treatment was, let alone what the efficacy of any single treatment of anything. If one did sugar shake before treatment and had 2 mites in a sugar shake and you kill 90% of them you are in good shape to hope you will have less than 2 when you do a sugar shake after treatment. If before treating you have 50 mites in sugar shake, then you treat with maqs, it could work perfectly, but you may still expect to have 5 mites in the next sugar shake. If your threshold is less than 2, then you still have reason to treat again after the maqs (OA) to get the mite count down to less than 2. It is possible to treat again with maqs, but the instructions are not more than once per month. Previous contributors pointed out that switching to OA weekly will provide faster results than waiting a month.

Link to post
Share on other sites
With regards to MAQS, I've read efficacy statements about MAQS being 90 percent. So, for every 1000 mites that fell out dead then another 111 mites could still be in there.

111 mites in a winter population of 10,000 would be 3.3 mites per 300 bee sample. Half way between autumn and spring treatments that number wouldn't alarm me. Sample now to confirm the treatment then again late August to adjust your spring treatment plan.

Link to post
Share on other sites
great result. Taking the maqs out was totally fine but also optional. Owing to the fact you had mites up the wazoo, and since it was a cold day, I would have left the MAQS in there not opened the hive and given them first OA treament then and there. On the basis the maqs is now spent anyway and because of the cold you couldn't do a sugar shake to prove that the OA wasn't necessary. Probably the mite count is severely depleted but still above the trigger level for treating. If it is a flying day on next visit then maybe it is possible to do a sugar shake to find out where you are. If it is still too cold then I'd propose to launch into weekly OA treatment until you have a flying day where you could do a sugar shake. If you get to the point where no mites are falling after 4 weeks of treatment then you could have a think at that point.

 

I hope that makes sense. I wrote it thinking about what I would attempt to do in your position.

I'll be interested to hear what others recommend and how it works out on your future visits.

Awesome! Thank for your advise, I was thinking along the same lines, I will be definitely taking the AO kit along for the ride next time I visit the hive, I must remember to look for a hole in my bee suit to, today the grumpy ######s got in and jabbed one in my ribs and also got under my vale, I frantically tried to squish her against my head before I got stung but managed to clobber my head with the hive tool I was still holding, now I got a cut in the top of my head! Well at least it won't itch for two day like if I got a sting!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
111 mites in a winter population of 10,000 would be 3.3 mites per 300 bee sample. Half way between autumn and spring treatments that number wouldn't alarm me. Sample now to confirm the treatment then again late August to adjust your spring treatment plan.

 

you're quoting out of context the discussion started with 1000 mites on a sticky board.

 

 

It must be hell being a compulsive analyst ! :lol I'm a bung the treatment in & hope for the best kind of guy. A threshold of two seems like a reason to be forever plastering the sheilas with something or other !

 

If you have three mites in a sample of 300 bees, that is generally considered to be 1%.

Many beekeeping experts recommend keeping the mite level below 1%. Look up Randy Oliver to name just one.

I certainly didn't make it up, I just read and listen.

The actual threshold level for treating would ideally vary at different times of year but 1% is the general answer that is fairly widely accepted.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I done the MAQS treatment and have the results, I left the boxes as is, and put the strips between the two brood boxes, I put a board under the hive with upside down packaging tape wrapped around it to act as a stick board, and could not count the varroa after the 7 day period, there were to many! Maybe 1000+, the hive seems to be normal, still aggressive, but it was a cold day, so only took the strips out.

[ATTACH]14065[/ATTACH] [ATTACH]14067[/ATTACH] [ATTACH]14068[/ATTACH]

Wow! That is an eye watering result! Your hive will be in significant trouble... If it were me I would swap them so they are back home. Feed them a little syrup every few days with some pollen supplement as well to get brood rearing going. If your lucky there will be enough healthy enough bees for the colony to survive.

 

 

Without trying to sound harsh, but I would recommend keeping two hives at home. If you have more than a back yards worth of space, I would expand that out to 5 max for your first few years. Many people have gone in with a dozen hives and had mass hive losses. Dont be like them (y)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow! That is an eye watering result! Your hive will be in significant trouble... If it were me I would swap them so they are back home. Feed them a little syrup every few days with some pollen supplement as well to get brood rearing going. If your lucky there will be enough healthy enough bees for the colony to survive.

 

 

Without trying to sound harsh, but I would recommend keeping two hives at home. If you have more than a back yards worth of space, I would expand that out to 5 max for your first few years. Many people have gone in with a dozen hives and had mass hive losses. Dont be like them (y)

I had this hive at home a while ago, I took them to Featherston because the neighbour was getting hassled, as for brood, there is a heap, last week there was 4 completly full frames of brood in all stages and some half frames, and I do have two hives at home which are doing great, it's good to have these hives to compare with my one hive in Featherston, I'm confident the bees are in good shape for the rest of the winter now the MAQS treatment has knocked the varroa down, and I will do another sugar shake ASAP, but I am worried about the amount of bees and their remaining stores, they started with a full 3/4 box and 5 FD in the brood boxes, so I am worried they will go through their store before spring and will have to keep an eye on them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I had this hive at home a while ago, I took them to Featherston because the neighbour was getting hassled, as for brood, there is a heap, last week there was 4 completly full frames of brood in all stages and some half frames, and I do have two hives at home which are doing great, it's good to have these hives to compare with my one hive in Featherston, I'm confident the bees are in good shape for the rest of the winter now the MAQS treatment has knocked the varroa down, and I will do another sugar shake ASAP, but I am worried about the amount of bees and their remaining stores, they started with a full 3/4 box and 5 FD in the brood boxes, so I am worried they will go through their store before spring and will have to keep an eye on them.

Were there any dead bees on the ground? What was the condition os the wings of the bees like? Do you know the effect the varroa have on the bee population?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Were there any dead bees on the ground? What was the condition os the wings of the bees like? Do you know the effect the varroa have on the bee population?

Yes there were a lot of dead bees around the hive, more noticable around this hive because it sits on a raised shelter with decking timber, so you can see the dead bees on the shelter floor easier than if the hive was on the grass, I put all the dead bees down to the number of bees in the hive and maybe the MAQS knocked a few off, no sign of deformed wing virus.

I was going to take a photo of the amount of bees in the top box, but couldn't because my phone camera is a touch screen, last time I tried, I took one glove off and the bees knew exactly where to attack, my hand, so that was the last of that!

Link to post
Share on other sites
even though you have alot of brood your mite load has been high and the emerging bees could have high virus levels when they emerge.

Yes these are my thoughts also.

Has anyone ever removed brood from a hive like this and thrown it away leaving only uncapped brood in the hive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just done another sugar shake on this hive today, 10 varroa per 1/2 cup of bees! This is after end of spring bayvoral, oxalic acid treatment once a week for 5 weeks during the Bayvarol, and MAQS two weeks ago, I'm thinking since the temp during the week of MAQS was at the low end, maybe the treatment didn't penetrate the comb probably, and now the varroa I'm seeing are the ones ebmerging with the young bees? Don't really know what to do now!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just done another sugar shake on this hive today, 10 varroa per 1/2 cup of bees! This is after end of spring bayvoral, oxalic acid treatment once a week for 5 weeks during the Bayvarol, and MAQS two weeks ago, I'm thinking since the temp during the week of MAQS was at the low end, maybe the treatment didn't penetrate the comb probably, and now the varroa I'm seeing are the ones ebmerging with the young bees? Don't really know what to do now!

Cool temps and perhaps the wind we've had dispersed the fumes before they had a chance to do their thing. How tightly do the boxes go together? Are they drafty?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool temps and perhaps the wind we've had dispersed the fumes before they had a chance to do their thing. How tightly do the boxes go together? Are they drafty?

The boxes fit good, I have a small stick under the top cover for moisture control and that's about it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
That's a no no with MAQS

Whoops! I read the fine print, only mentioned about elevating the bottom box if can can't completly open enterance, or leave open mesh floor open, since my MAQS was such a success, could I get away with another treatment of it? I know if says not to, but I feel like the hive is in trouble anyway.

No sign of Deformaed Wing or any visible issues, heaps of bees and I checked the stores and they seem to be filling the half empty 3/4 honey frames, so there must be nectar around somewhere, and still mega grumpy!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...