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NZBF giant willow aphid

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Dang. willows may suffer big time this season.

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They're creepy little suckers:mad:

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They're creepy little suckers:mad:

They're like all of us, just trying to make a living....

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I am looking at giving friends a beehive when I do my first split. They live next to a lake which which is surrounded by willow trees that have giant willow aphids. Is it a good idea for bees being that close to that many willow trees? Also the father of one of my friends had bees but that was years ago, so he does not have much experience. So I am a little concerned for the health of the bees with the willow.

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The giant willow aphid feasts on willow trees. Indirectly later in the season bees can gather from willow trees and put willow dew into the hives as stores. There is no threat to the bees other than only a percentage of the willow dew can be used a bee food.

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From the Useless Information Dept, there are no Giant Willow Aphids in Molesworth.

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From the Useless Information Dept, there are no Giant Willow Aphids in Molesworth.

I really need to know that. Thanks you very much.

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Interesting, we have a big willow tree and something attacks it because if fills with the paper wasp every year, but not bees and yet our area has many bee hives. I have a flowering cherry the definately fills with bees when it blooms, but when I hear the buzz in the willow tree and go and look there are no bees, just the little paper wasp.

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Does Scymnus loewii – Dusky Ladybird help control Giant Willow Aphid?

I see its commercially availible in nz for biological control of aphids.

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Coming to a hive near you, These are harlequin ladybirds. a new incursion into NZ and spreading fast. I have hives in an area where GWA honeydew is a problem. This year these ladybirds have built up in number feeding on the GWA. they were flying into me while I was working my hives and the photo shows a cluster, one of many under a lid on top of my hive mat.IMGP3699

IMGP3699.jpg.b8ae8cc4ea3d3e4892e93aa1c19c1025.jpg

IMGP3697.jpg.6895d8f30756c89ba4d153b1cf1bcaf6.jpg

IMGP3699.jpg.b8ae8cc4ea3d3e4892e93aa1c19c1025.jpg

IMGP3697.jpg.6895d8f30756c89ba4d153b1cf1bcaf6.jpg

Edited by Guest
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I have seen one here in my tunnel house.

I was hoping it would feed on the spider mites on my egg plants

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Coming to a hive near you, These are harlequin ladybirds. a new incursion into NZ and spreading fast. I have hives in an area where GWA honeydew is a problem. This year these ladybirds have built up in number feeding on the GWA. they were flying into me while I was working my hives and the photo shows a cluster, one of many under a lid on top of my hive mat.IMGP3699

That has to be good news, I think. Wonder what else these ladybirds predate on.

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Harlequin Ladybirds (Harmonia axyridis ) out compete with native spotted ladybirds. they are a problem for the wine industry as they cluster in grape bunches and taint the wine with a repellent chemical they use to repel predators . As it goes in nature, if a food source is there in abundance,(GWA), a predator will flourish, They are near my hives.

The movement of Harlequins is restricted at present, you need a EPA permit to do anything with them but with the speed they're naturally spreading I cannot see the restriction being in place for long.

Now all we need to do is convince the ladybirds that varroa taste good.

Kind of scary to read Kaihoka's post of the body builder's experience.

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Harlequin Ladybirds (Harmonia axyridis ) out compete with native spotted ladybirds. they are a problem for the wine industry as they cluster in grape bunches and taint the wine with a repellent chemical they use to repel predators . As it goes in nature, if a food source is there in abundance,(GWA), a predator will flourish, They are near my hives.

The movement of Harlequins is restricted at present, you need a EPA permit to do anything with them but with the speed they're naturally spreading I cannot see the restriction being in place for long.

Now all we need to do is convince the ladybirds that varroa taste good.

Kind of scary to read Kaihoka's post of the body builder's experience.

they will probably achieve the same status as white tail spiders

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Has any one seen birds eating them? Im sure iv seen birds getting stuck into them, hard to know for sure as birds were high up the trees, this was while we were cutting golden willow poles for river protection in canterbury. The info i have read about them is that in general the predetors will keep them at bay but i geuss that process of adapting to an aphid diet will take some time. Nature always has a way of finding a balance it just takes time.

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wasps are a the main predator for aphid in case that hasn't come up yet.

when they are finished with the aphids they switch to weak bee hives......:(

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Has any one seen birds eating them? Im sure iv seen birds getting stuck into them, hard to know for sure as birds were high up the trees, this was while we were cutting golden willow poles for river protection in canterbury. The info i have read about them is that in general the predetors will keep them at bay but i geuss that process of adapting to an aphid diet will take some time. Nature always has a way of finding a balance it just takes time.

It is the sort of thing wax eyes eat

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wasps are a the main predator for aphid in case that hasn't come up yet.

when they are finished with the aphids they switch to weak bee hives......:(

Iv seen alot of wasps working the willows but none ever eating them only ever on the due

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