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Whats the way to make the cheapest box for 10 litre feeders? I know this sounds ruthless......

With wood.

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Whats the way to make the cheapest box for 10 litre feeders? I know this sounds ruthless......

Find an old 20l container and cut it in half. Just make sure the container didnt have anything ugly in it.

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Find an old 20l container and cut it in half. Just make sure the container didnt have anything ugly in it.

He wants to know how to make the box, not the container

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Whats the way to make the cheapest box for 10 litre feeders? I know this sounds ruthless......

Cheapest feeders i ever made were from pallet timber. Takes a bit of effort to break them down but the pallets are free around here. Just need to find ones with suitable width boards.

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Whats the way to make the cheapest box for 10 litre feeders? I know this sounds ruthless......

If you have them you could rip a 3/4 depth box in to two 90mm high feeder rims. Or as @Rob Stockley mentioned pallet wood would be your next free option.

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Thanks looking at both those options...What about 100 ml totara anyone done that? Thinking I can rebate with my own router?

Absolutely. Whatever untreated wood you can get your hands on. Go for it.

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Yeah but can you do it cheaper than a kit set Trevor?

Depends on what price you pay for your wood.

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Yeah but can you do it cheaper than a kit set Trevor?

It depends on what you consider your time is worth. To pull apart and cleanup old pallets would be a lot more expensive than buying new timber as far as I am concerned. I hate recycling timber, and sharpening blades after you hit a missed nail can get very expensive.

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It depends on what you consider your time is worth. To pull apart and cleanup old pallets would be a lot more expensive than buying new timber as far as I am concerned. I hate recycling timber, and sharpening blades after you hit a missed nail can get very expensive.

If I'm cleaning up recycled Rimu (for the house not beehives) I always wait until I need to change the thicknesser blades and then run the timber through on the old blades, same for the saw blades I use a blade that already has a chipped tooth or two.

The only time I've used recycled pallets (for beehives) was a few years ago I had access to large pallets made from durable tropical hardwood, The boards were 4 meters long x 200 wide the only problem was the timber was so hard it was slow to machine and hard on the machines. Now I stick to Macrocarpa and Radiata

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100x25 r/s u/t pine boxing (new) is typically 94cents per metre (retail).

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has anyone used blue gum to make boxes? we have a tree in the yard that I'm looking at milling for longevity of woodware but does it tend to split?? Advice anyone? Thanks

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100x25 r/s u/t pine boxing (new) is typically 94cents per metre (retail).

Yes. and you only need 1.8m so I don't see how pallet wood can be any cheaper than less than $2.00 per feeder ring.

 

 

has anyone used blue gum to make boxes? we have a tree in the yard that I'm looking at milling for longevity of woodware but does it tend to split?? Advice anyone? Thanks

Not to make boxes but I have used lots of it.

Very hard on machinery and yes it splits like made. Very hard to nail and nail holes need to be drilled. On the plus side the boxes will last almost forever (or until AFB)

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has anyone used blue gum to make boxes? we have a tree in the yard that I'm looking at milling for longevity of woodware but does it tend to split?? Advice anyone? Thanks

And you'd be adding a lot of weight, Full size supers are heavy enough with pine, so a 3/4 or 1/2 size boxes would be a better idea. And it would need to be well sealed - painted etc, as gum especially at the sizes needed for a hive box would move and distort forever.

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You'd certainly be adding weight. I don't think stability would be a problem if the timber had been conditioned properly before

machining but I wouldn't even bother trying. There's gum & there's gum but to most people everything in sight is a bluegum. If it's a decent tree you'd be better off selling it for landscaping timber.

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On ‎20‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 9:37 AM, Anne said:

has anyone used blue gum to make boxes? we have a tree in the yard that I'm looking at milling for longevity of woodware but does it tend to split?? Advice anyone? Thanks

Anne, did you carry on with the blue gum boxes, or has any one tried making any ?

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On ‎20‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 5:59 AM, Trevor Gillbanks said:

It depends on what you consider your time is worth. To pull apart and cleanup old pallets would be a lot more expensive than buying new timber as far as I am concerned. I hate recycling timber, and sharpening blades after you hit a missed nail can get very expensive.

I knew an older gent who was a calendar salesman, made all his beekeeping gear out of pallets, after work each night he would pull pallets apart and even straighten the nails. He made 400 hives and honey boxes that way an ended up with 1000 hives corrugated tin lids every thing was made for cheap. He left his job and employed two workers while he went from 400 to 1000 hives. It all depends on what you are able or want to do. I bought that business 18yrs ago, I replaced all the s..t gear but its still going today. Ive still got some of his original boxes but they will be replaced this season.

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