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For the last few years I have been expecting honey prices to drop but they keep on going up. This is not the case in the rest of the world where honey prices have roughly halved in the last year. If y

i don't think that's correct. i think countries that use antibiotics are the exception and even were antibiotics are registered only few beekeepers use them. maybe someone has some data?

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What is manuka honey worth in bulk prices?

You're a commercial beekeeper from Whangarei and you don't know what Manuka honey is worth...really? Posting to get the post count up so you can advertise again may see you get a warning and a reduction of your post count.

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You're a commercial beekeeper from Whangarei and you don't know what Manuka honey is worth...really? Posting to get the post count up so you can advertise again may see you get a warning and a reduction of your post count.

i think hes one of the workers. may not be privy to the deals his work does.

his boss is a member on here.

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  • 4 months later...
Little or nothing.

 

The price is low because there is an oversupply of honey in the World. We have just finished an extended period of record high World honey prices. As we can see in the last 15 years or so in New Zealand, when beekeepers are profitable they build more beehives. We have increased from 290,000 hives in 2000 to over 600,000 hives today, driven by profitable times. The World has also resposnded to the high World prices and increased hives and production. When beekeepers are not profitable, their hives languish, they don't replace deadouts, there are no new entrants to the industry and retiring beekeepers' gear sits in sheds unsold, so production eventually falls, the oversupply decreases, and prices then rise again. These cycles can take 15 to 20 years or more to pass. But we often get major short term shifts in pricing that are driven by government intervention in the market, some examples of this are the EU banning of imports of Chinese honey for Chlordimeform and later Chlorampehnicol, the US putting dumping duties on Argentina and China and the US price support scheme run by the CCC. Where these shifts prevent major producers (China, Argentina, Mexico etc.) from getting to their major markets (EU, USA) then they have short term effects on the availability of supplies and prices rise. But then fall again after.

 

Another driver is the World sweetener price and a large effect here is the oil price. Brazil is the largest sugar producer in the World and when oil prices are high, turns much of its crop into ethanol. But when oil prices are low, the ethanol production is reduced and the extra available sugar drives World prices down in turn also affecting the price of HFCS and other sweeteners. In the US approximately half of their honey consumption is as an ingredient in manufactured goods, so a decrease in competing sweeteners puts pressure on honey prices.

 

We are fortunate to be protected from these low prices by the manuka bubble, where all our honeys are being blended and sold as manuka. But being based on a falsehood, it would be unwise to rely on a continuation of this in your business plan.

 

 

There's another side to the increase in hive numbers .... that if you are not in the manuka bubble then beekeeping is marginal and one tends to increase hive numbers to create an economy of scale within the operation to justify buying top of the line machinery and paying over and above wages to box boys.

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There's another side to the increase in hive numbers .... that if you are not in the manuka bubble then beekeeping is marginal and one tends to increase hive numbers to create an economy of scale within the operation to justify buying top of the line machinery and paying over and above wages to box boys.

This has always made very little sense to me..

More hives = staff.

Staff = a hell of a lot more work.

Why don't people just make the number of hives they can handle.. I would have a tenth of the hives of most commercial beekeepers and I make a good living (so far anyway) I employ no staff, and I probably work the equivalent of 5 months a year.

I seldom move my hives, and they are lifted by hand, and I use a single cab ute.

 

Simple. Easy. Low stress.

Great lifestyle.

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I was shocked to see the numbers of hives quoted above (We have increased from 290,000 hives in 2000 to over 600,000 hives today, driven by profitable times.) surely these numbers are unsustainable on such a small land mass. Obviously hive numbers have increased with rising honey prices, and these prices are a result of international demand. What the NZ honey industry has now is a typical bubble, over capacity and over capitalization.

From what I have been able to glean, your exporters (and ours) are beginning to resort to fraudulent marketing practices to try and maintain their shrinking margins. I also read here on this forum from time to time of the squabbles among beekeepers who are having beehives dumped on or adjacent to already claimed and traditional apiary sites.

 

To compound beekeepers approaching financial problems is the collapsing global trading model, to be replaced by one of national protectionism, I see these trends to be the early signals of coming financial pain for the honey industry. The effects of collapsing world trade, value of national currencies and lower honey prices all at the same time, to extend the pain world wide and to be felt here in Australia as well. On the other side of the coming financial and apiary size restructure I see a much healthier and honest honey industry in both of our countries.

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This has always made very little sense to me..

More hives = staff.

Staff = a hell of a lot more work.

Why don't people just make the number of hives they can handle.. I would have a tenth of the hives of most commercial beekeepers and I make a good living (so far anyway) I employ no staff, and I probably work the equivalent of 5 months a year.

I seldom move my hives, and they are lifted by hand, and I use a single cab ute.

 

Simple. Easy. Low stress.

Great lifestyle.

I couldn't agree more!!!!!

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This has always made very little sense to me..

More hives = staff.

Staff = a hell of a lot more work.

Why don't people just make the number of hives they can handle.. I would have a tenth of the hives of most commercial beekeepers and I make a good living (so far anyway) I employ no staff, and I probably work the equivalent of 5 months a year.

I seldom move my hives, and they are lifted by hand, and I use a single cab ute.

 

Simple. Easy. Low stress.

Great lifestyle.

Yo .... quite agree Daley ..... lets talk again when you've got a couple of scone gobblers and need a little bit more space in the truck for all the gear that goes with them !:D:D

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Yo .... quite agree Daley ..... lets talk again when you've got a couple of scone gobblers and need a little bit more space in the truck for all the gear that goes with them !:D:D

My man could probably stop working to take care of them :rofl:

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OK Honey .... we're done talking scone gobblers ..... back to business. Honey prices. Anyone sold any this year or got an inkling on price..... is it worth selling or should we just leave it on for the winter, close the shed down and head up to the bach in the Cooks ?

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This has always made very little sense to me..

More hives = staff.

Staff = a hell of a lot more work.

Why don't people just make the number of hives they can handle.. I would have a tenth of the hives of most commercial beekeepers and I make a good living (so far anyway) I employ no staff, and I probably work the equivalent of 5 months a year.

I seldom move my hives, and they are lifted by hand, and I use a single cab ute.

 

Simple. Easy. Low stress.

Great lifestyle.

 

Same model i use and lots of agri business should apply same model

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Be very careful discussing prices. The commerce commission takes a very broad and dim view of price-fixing. I have seen them get very antsy about what I would have considered normal discussion between beekeepers.

As for business size I have been part of what was the biggest beekeeping company in New Zealand, worked in a two-man partnership with 2000 hives and currently run 350. All had their advantages and disadvantages but I am happy the way I am at the moment. Unfortunately in Hawke's Bay this year the price of honey doesn't matter that much as there is not any and a lot of hives will be lucky to get their winter stores. I'm glad I don't have to pay wages in a year like this.

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..... back to business. Honey prices. Anyone sold any this year or got an inkling on price..... i?

 

Nope and nope and I don't think we will have much to sell anyway.

Has anyone heard if MPI have their act together enough to put out their version of what Manuka honey is?supposed to be this month but been saying that for a while now.

I think we will sell in bulk to Australia and they can mix it with their jelly bush put an active label on it and call it Manuka

 

@john berry i don't think sellers can be price fixers?

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This has always made very little sense to me..

More hives = staff.

Staff = a hell of a lot more work.

Why don't people just make the number of hives they can handle.. I would have a tenth of the hives of most commercial beekeepers and I make a good living (so far anyway) I employ no staff, and I probably work the equivalent of 5 months a year.

I seldom move my hives, and they are lifted by hand, and I use a single cab ute.

 

Simple. Easy. Low stress.

Great lifestyle.

depends a lot on where you are. i know guys whose season finishes by xmas. downside being if its a poor spring they can get nothing.

 

the other thing is there is a profitable size. these days due to high honey prices you can be profitable with a small number of hives. however should prices drop, that will change. small beeks would have to expand their hive numbers or quit.

 

 

Has anyone heard if MPI have their act together

price wise i think everyone is waiting on that.

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The beek who has 16 hives on my place said he had not sold any of last season's honey yet.

He thought the price would go up.

After Reading assorted posts on the state of peoples honey crop I think he must have had inside info from the weather gods.

I wonder how many other beeks are sitting on last year's crop

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Nope and nope and I don't think we will have much to sell anyway.

Has anyone heard if MPI have their act together enough to put out their version of what Manuka honey is?supposed to be this month but been saying that for a while now.

I think we will sell in bulk to Australia and they can mix it with their jelly bush put an active label on it and call it Manuka

 

@john berry i don't think sellers can be price fixers?

:(:eek:

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The beek who has 16 hives on my place said he had not sold any of last season's honey yet.

He thought the price would go up.

After Reading assorted posts on the state of peoples honey crop I think he must have had inside info from the weather gods.

I wonder how many other beeks are sitting on last year's crop

 

The price of honey going one way down

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In my first year of beekeeping in 1960 I received 6d per pound (11 cents per kg) from wescobee for my honey, so when I think honey prices are low I take a trip down memory lane and thank my lucky stars. I survived in 1960's because of youth and optimism, now I recon we will survive the next crash because of age, wisdom and planning.

inflation adjusted just under $3 per kg....

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