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Thankyou for you detailed post, but don't put words in my mouth.

 

EFB need not have a huge effect on NZ bee health, but I suspect that you and John are correct that it would be. I certainly don't want another bee disease in NZ, my job is hard enough as it is

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That will please those companies wanting to import Australian Leptospermum/"manuka" honey.

 

And theres the rub :(

 

In the not too distant past no-one involved in the beekeeping industry in NZ wanted honey imports from anywhere to protect our bees from all the pests and diseases we dont have.

Now we have companies advocating for imports of Australian " manuka"

I wonder how many of these companies have people standing for election to the new apiculture industry board :(

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Now we have companies advocating for imports of Australian " manuka"

Is this substantive A grade gossip, or a chinese whisper ?

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Ozzy holler

is this a word i need to add to my vocabulary?

what does it mean?

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Ozzy is an Australian,

Holler is yelling or shouting

Ozzys dont whisper, they are loud like Americans.

 

So rather than Chinese whispers its Australians yelling it from the roof tops.

Just a few generalisations to start the morning.

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is this a word i need to add to my vocabulary?

what does it mean?

How long until you are fully assimilated Tom? The Borg are struggling with you it seems.

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How long until you are fully assimilated Tom? The Borg are struggling with you it seems.

 

they never run out of resources. just when i think i got all covered.

also i'm no linguistic talent combined with poor memory.

so assimilation is a slow on.

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As others have referred to, the consumption of honey in New Zealand has and is dropping. Probably a pricing issue, but also a new wave of healthy eaters who are avoiding sugar. Sugar is getting some bad press also. Honey is sweet as.

 

I noticed lately that honey on the supermarket shelf is often on promotion.

 

Today I went to online Countdown- The cheapest bush/clover honey's typically selling for between $22-25 a kilogram. (500gram pots)

A beekeeper might get paid $14-$15 a kilo, in the drum.

Add on, packaging, labeling, delivery, middle person and of course the supermarket mark up. What's left? Maybe someone here can enlighten us?

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In Hong Kong at a local supermarket not high price one we found this 1NZ $ = 5 HK $

image.jpeg.5dbef44d6e43b4178aa8cac09eacc2a4.jpeg

image.jpeg.8c8f386e94f4108e116c2ebce081d2a2.jpeg

image.jpeg.5dbef44d6e43b4178aa8cac09eacc2a4.jpeg

image.jpeg.8c8f386e94f4108e116c2ebce081d2a2.jpeg

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In Hong Kong at a local supermarket not high price one we found this 1NZ $ = 5 HK $

So... Were they selling much? A

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In Hong Kong at a local supermarket not high price one we found this 1NZ $ = 5 HK $

No wonder our supermarkets are full of tourists buying honey

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In Hong Kong at a local supermarket not high price one we found this 1NZ $ = 5 HK $

Thanks Chris, quite interesting. Suppose everything is expensive in Hong Kong. The jar below the Rewarewa? much cheaper but capilano?

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As others have referred to, the consumption of honey in New Zealand has and is dropping. Probably a pricing issue, but also a new wave of healthy eaters who are avoiding sugar. Sugar is getting some bad press also. Honey is sweet as.

 

A family with 2-3 children and say 60 grands a year before tax will not buy too much honey nowadays. Maybe some cheap lollys.

 

 

I noticed lately that honey on the supermarket shelf is often on promotion.

 

Today I went to online Countdown- The cheapest bush/clover honey's typically selling for between $22-25 a kilogram. (500gram pots)

A beekeeper might get paid $14-$15 a kilo, in the drum.

Add on, packaging, labeling, delivery, middle person and of course the supermarket mark up. What's left? Maybe someone here can enlighten us?

 

The cost of living in NZ is going ridiculously high. It has nothing to do with the "green" thing. Maybe with the "greed".

The incomes are already too high compared with other countries and the food is...... yahooooo :eek:

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A family with 2-3 children and say 60 grands a year before tax will not buy too much honey nowadays. Maybe some cheap lollys.

 

 

 

The cost of living in NZ is going ridiculously high. It has nothing to do with the "green" thing. Maybe with the "greed".

The incomes are already too high compared with other countries and the food is...... yahooooo :eek:

Yup, it's crazy! Makes growing ones own food a lot cheaper!!!

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So... Were they selling much? A

i don't know

 

 

Thanks Chris, quite interesting. Suppose everything is expensive in Hong Kong. The jar below the Rewarewa? much cheaper but capilano?

yes and no it cheaper to feed the family over there

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It would be interesting to know a bit about Honey harvested from the Amazon rain forest regions.

The world prices for bulk honey is low and one has to wonder how much of this is due to quality.|

Sure, Manuka has influenced our prices but how well do our second tier Honey's compare to other international honey's.

I mention rain forest honey because possibly our bush honey is comparable.

Are a lot of international Honeys simply inferior in terms of quality clean forage.

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It would be interesting to know a bit about Honey harvested from the Amazon rain forest regions.

The world prices for bulk honey is low and one has to wonder how much of this is due to quality.|

Sure, Manuka has influenced our prices but how well do our second tier Honey's compare to other international honey's.

I mention rain forest honey because possibly our bush honey is comparable.

Are a lot of international Honeys simply inferior in terms of quality clean forage.

Yup, Trust is very valuable!

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The world prices for bulk honey is low and one has to wonder how much of this is due to quality.|

Little or nothing.

 

The price is low because there is an oversupply of honey in the World. We have just finished an extended period of record high World honey prices. As we can see in the last 15 years or so in New Zealand, when beekeepers are profitable they build more beehives. We have increased from 290,000 hives in 2000 to over 600,000 hives today, driven by profitable times. The World has also resposnded to the high World prices and increased hives and production. When beekeepers are not profitable, their hives languish, they don't replace deadouts, there are no new entrants to the industry and retiring beekeepers' gear sits in sheds unsold, so production eventually falls, the oversupply decreases, and prices then rise again. These cycles can take 15 to 20 years or more to pass. But we often get major short term shifts in pricing that are driven by government intervention in the market, some examples of this are the EU banning of imports of Chinese honey for Chlordimeform and later Chlorampehnicol, the US putting dumping duties on Argentina and China and the US price support scheme run by the CCC. Where these shifts prevent major producers (China, Argentina, Mexico etc.) from getting to their major markets (EU, USA) then they have short term effects on the availability of supplies and prices rise. But then fall again after.

 

Another driver is the World sweetener price and a large effect here is the oil price. Brazil is the largest sugar producer in the World and when oil prices are high, turns much of its crop into ethanol. But when oil prices are low, the ethanol production is reduced and the extra available sugar drives World prices down in turn also affecting the price of HFCS and other sweeteners. In the US approximately half of their honey consumption is as an ingredient in manufactured goods, so a decrease in competing sweeteners puts pressure on honey prices.

 

We are fortunate to be protected from these low prices by the manuka bubble, where all our honeys are being blended and sold as manuka. But being based on a falsehood, it would be unwise to rely on a continuation of this in your business plan.

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Little or nothing.

 

The price is low because there is an oversupply of honey in the World. We have just finished an extended period of record high World honey prices. As we can see in the last 15 years or so in New Zealand, when beekeepers are profitable they build more beehives. We have increased from 290,000 hives in 2000 to over 600,000 hives today, driven by profitable times. The World has also resposnded to the high World prices and increased hives and production. When beekeepers are not profitable, their hives languish, they don't replace deadouts, there are no new entrants to the industry and retiring beekeepers' gear sits in sheds unsold, so production eventually falls, the oversupply decreases, and prices then rise again. These cycles can take 15 to 20 years or more to pass. But we often get major short term shifts in pricing that are driven by government intervention in the market, some examples of this are the EU banning of imports of Chinese honey for Chlordimeform and later Chlorampehnicol, the US putting dumping duties on Argentina and China and the US price support scheme run by the CCC. Where these shifts prevent major producers (China, Argentina, Mexico etc.) from getting to their major markets (EU, USA) then they have short term effects on the availability of supplies and prices rise. But then fall again after.

 

Another driver is the World sweetener price and a large effect here is the oil price. Brazil is the largest sugar producer in the World and when oil prices are high, turns much of its crop into ethanol. But when oil prices are low, the ethanol production is reduced and the extra available sugar drives World prices down in turn also affecting the price of HFCS and other sweeteners. In the US approximately half of their honey consumption is as an ingredient in manufactured goods, so a decrease in competing sweeteners puts pressure on honey prices.

 

We are fortunate to be protected from these low prices by the manuka bubble, where all our honeys are being blended and sold as manuka. But being based on a falsehood, it would be unwise to rely on a continuation of this in your business plan.

I am presuming you are a honey buyer - correct me if I'm wrong?? You are suggesting the current NZ honey prices are protected by the Manuka bubble and all honey is being blended - really?? Using good South Island clover as an example - surely the very high prices being paid for that are not seeing it used for blending purposes??? If the world market is so depressed how can marketers sell NZ clover at what must be a huge premium over the rest of the world??

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Using good South Island clover as an example

"Good clover" is a very subjective term. I wouldn't have clover honey in the house !

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Little or nothing.

 

The price is low because there is an oversupply of honey in the World. We have just finished an extended period of record high World honey prices. As we can see in the last 15 years or so in New Zealand, when beekeepers are profitable they build more beehives. We have increased from 290,000 hives in 2000 to over 600,000 hives today, driven by profitable times. The World has also resposnded to the high World prices and increased hives and production. When beekeepers are not profitable, their hives languish, they don't replace deadouts, there are no new entrants to the industry and retiring beekeepers' gear sits in sheds unsold, so production eventually falls, the oversupply decreases, and prices then rise again. These cycles can take 15 to 20 years or more to pass. But we often get major short term shifts in pricing that are driven by government intervention in the market, some examples of this are the EU banning of imports of Chinese honey for Chlordimeform and later Chlorampehnicol, the US putting dumping duties on Argentina and China and the US price support scheme run by the CCC. Where these shifts prevent major producers (China, Argentina, Mexico etc.) from getting to their major markets (EU, USA) then they have short term effects on the availability of supplies and prices rise. But then fall again after.

 

Another driver is the World sweetener price and a large effect here is the oil price. Brazil is the largest sugar producer in the World and when oil prices are high, turns much of its crop into ethanol. But when oil prices are low, the ethanol production is reduced and the extra available sugar drives World prices down in turn also affecting the price of HFCS and other sweeteners. In the US approximately half of their honey consumption is as an ingredient in manufactured goods, so a decrease in competing sweeteners puts pressure on honey prices.

 

We are fortunate to be protected from these low prices by the manuka bubble, where all our honeys are being blended and sold as manuka. But being based on a falsehood, it would be unwise to rely on a continuation of this in your business plan.

Thanks for that very enlightening post.

Can you rate our Bush and Clover Honeys compared to Honeys from elsewhere?

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Dont underrate NZ honey though. We must keep marketing it as a superior product (and back that claim up) to maintain a higher price while the world markets fluctuate.

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Dont underrate NZ honey though. We must keep marketing it as a superior product (and back that claim up) to maintain a higher price while the world markets fluctuate.

Yes I agree Dan

Every time I scoop a teaspoon of Clover or Bush from a pot in the cupboard Im taken back to the video on this site of the Asian migratory beekeepers and their very wet Acacia Honey crops.

My current pot of Clover, harvested from a very strong Sheep and Cattle farm in Mihi (Reporoa)is simply superb and difficult to imagine a better Honey.

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NZ products have great reputation world wide for a long time. Always the good top quality left NZ shores and the not too good is left over here for there rest of us.... + the cheap imports to fill the market.

 

Honey and beekeeping products are safe in term of import ban and I hope this will stay like that for a long long time. I wish few other type of foods to fall in the same category.

 

While the world import/export honey prices are "low" the end consumer will pay a big price for that jar of honey.

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