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Heike

Epipen saved my life last night

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I've wondered if it is Propolis too! Darned hard to pick quite what it is really. better not be honey!!

Go tip a pot of honey down yourself, you will soon find out :-)

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@Hieke Thanks for sharing your quite terrifying experience of anaphylaxis reaction to a sting with the forum members.

You have probably saved someone else's life by doing so.

Its been a real wake up call, Epipen/s are now on the list of must haves.

Regards

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Just wondering how many stings you might have received over your lifetime?

 

I read somewhere (unsubstantiated factoid) that regular moderate doses (stings) were unlikely to progress to allergy. Conversely infrequent stings or frequent but tiny exposure (bee suit -> washing machine -> clothes -> skin) were very likely to progress to allergy. Just wondering whether your experience supports these factoids? Of course there's also Murphy - he doesn't like factoids.

We used to wash our beesuits in the washing machine before we read about that this is not good practice. I haven't had many beestings in my life and since we have been beekeeping i have always worn the suit to avoid getting stung, so i might have only got a couple of stings a year. However Olaf for instant gets stung quiet a bit but being a hobbyist probably still far away from a commercial person who probably gets stung every month, week?? Assumptions! Olaf mentioned this morning that his reaction to the stings seem to increase everytime. Maybe hobbyist are in bigger danger then commercials, is that what you are thinking. Personally, after this experience i just wouldn't take my chances and relay on assumptions but rather spent the $120 on an epipen. I am also wondering about commercial businesses that employ beeks. (Now i am probably getting everybody's back up.) with the new health & safety regs( i know, some things are totally over the top) do commercials have to ensure they have at least some andrenalin on hand if one of their workers gets a severe reaction? Also wondering whether we will see more reactions over the years now that hobby beekeeping is taking off everywhere. we really need a bit more research on this whole beesting allergy.

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do commercials have to ensure they have at least some andrenalin on hand if one of their workers gets a severe reaction?

Please correct me if I am wrong here but I think you need consent from your employee before you stick a needle in him/her so to carry an epipen would be the employee's responsibility? Having an epipen in the car is a good idea I think (as long as it doesn't get to hot) but you may have to get your staff to sign a consent form or something like that. Gotta love H&S :cautious:

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I was walking through our hallway towards our bedroom last night when i walked over a dead bee which was lying there smack in the middle of the carpet. The old stinger got me in my big toe and it hurt like hell. 2 minutes later my hands started itching like mad, then my shoulder and neck, my whole body was suddenly covered in hives and my lips started to feel numb, like after an injection at the dentist. We rung an ambulance and decided to walk to the road since we are living in a rural location without street lights and our entrance is not easy to find. Before leaving the house i grabbed the epipen which we had purchased for the eventual visitor that might be allergic to bee stings. I remember giving it to Olaf and then i collapsed. Olaf carried me to the road with difficulties. He now says there is some urgent need for me to loose some weight... (Very funny)

On the way he jabed me with the epipen. I can't remember it. In the past we always had some andrenalin in the house to be administered with a sirenge and needle (just in case). Lots cheaper but last night that just wouldn't have done the trick. Not in total darkness and when panicking.

So here we are, without this epipen i very likely would not be here today. Had to stay in the hospital until 4 this morning and then got steroids and antihistamine for the next few days. The doctor warned us saying next time the reaction could be even more severe. (Not sure how it can be any worse then what it was).

I have had bee stings before, the last one a few weeks ago. I am gutted. Not sure what to do with our hives now. Having 100,000 + bees around our home is not comforting for me right now.

 

I found a pharmacy that sells epipen for $120 incl freight - i think it is worth it. They now last between 15-18 months. Link comming, just have to look it up again.

 

Allergypharmacy.co.nz they are in queenstown, found them through google.

Thanks for sharing. We have talked off and on about getting epipens. I didn't realise there was child and adult ones. Will be ordering ours today !!

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For sale:

7 hives in total full of happy bees

1 x 2 brood boxes (both full depth)

4 x 2 brood boxes ( one full depth, one 3/4)

1 x 3 brood boxes ( three 3/4 depth)

1 x 2 brood boxes ( two 3/4)

 

Full AFB check done end of march. (DECA holder) 5 of them treated with MAQS in March, 2 with bayvarol which still has to come out (inserted 9/4/16)

 

Going into winter (really??, well its raining for a change) of course things change in the brood boxes i.e queen might stopped laying, they might be putting a lot of honey into one of the brood boxes etc...

 

They come with brand new mesh floors as well as plastic mouse & wasp guards, lids and hive mats of course.

 

Beekeeper ID H4621

 

Can provide photos once it stops raining.

 

$750.00 per hive, would prefer bulk purchase.

 

They have to be collected.

Oh. Does this mean you have decided to hang up your bee suit after the allergic response. So sorry to hear that.

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Its also a good idea to carry a packet of clarantyne .they are an over the counter anti histamine hayfever medication .the active ingredient is 10 mg loradine which is what i was given earlier this year when i had an anaphlactic reaction to about a dozen stings on my throat and head .we keep a packet in the glove box and another in first aid kit with epipen.

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Its also a good idea to carry a packet of clarantyne .they are an over the counter anti histamine hayfever medication .the active ingredient is 10 mg loradine which is what i was given earlier this year when i had an anaphlactic reaction to about a dozen stings on my throat and head .we keep a packet in the glove box and another in first aid kit with epipen.

Last time I looked the most concentrated (and cheapest by weight of active ingredient) was loratabs.... I think 30mg? It was a while ago... If you can get them down while you can still swallow they can apparently take a lot of kick out of a significant reaction....

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I've received my epipen, pretty good for a 2.30pm order yesterday. It's gone straight into my bee gear bin. The other thing I'll be doing is keeping all my bee related gear kept separate and binned so as not to expose my lot to it - it seems that incremental exposure may result in the exaggerated response to a sting.

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Just to be clear, antihistamine is NOT a substitute for an epipen, and DOES NOT TREAT THE LIFE-THREATENING SYMPTOMS OF ANAPHYLAXIS.

 

Antihistamine will reduce swelling and itching, both local and if you have a more general hives reaction, but it does nothing to assist your blood pressure or breathing.

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Just to be clear, antihistamine is NOT a substitute for an epipen, and DOES NOT TREAT THE LIFE-THREATENING SYMPTOMS OF ANAPHYLAXIS.

 

Antihistamine will reduce swelling and itching, both local and if you have a more general hives reaction, but it does nothing to assist your blood pressure or breathing.

Yes!

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The idea of keeping an epipen about gets better and better. Haven't done so far but maybe it is time.

Am wondering about the "hives" (on the body) is that a typical reaction?

Why I ask is that for past 3 weeks I have suffered hive type lump/bumps and itching (dementing!!) on my forearms. Have been extracting, handling wets, honey etc.

Guess what @Heike? Doc has given antihistamines and steroids!! I feel great but still itching and hate taking the steroids.

I get about 1 sting a week on average and haven't thought it a reaction to those.....never know I suppose.

You going to shout your buddy?

I was telling Olaf what you said and he said that he already had his reward, more time with his favorite girl. Can't beat that one :-)

 

Oh. Does this mean you have decided to hang up your bee suit after the allergic response. So sorry to hear that.

Yes, for now that will be the right thing to do. But i have already made an appointment with my doc to get the desensitivation against bee stings under way. You nev know, we might be back soon :-)

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Thanks for sharing your story and I`m pleased your ok.

I`ve just ordered one.

You gave me the push I needed.

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I've received my epipen, pretty good for a 2.30pm order yesterday. It's gone straight into my bee gear bin. The other thing I'll be doing is keeping all my bee related gear kept separate and binned so as not to expose my lot to it - it seems that incremental exposure may result in the exaggerated response to a sting.

Still thinking about an EpiPen - @Heike 's reaction is thought provoking. To those who have got one - note the pen needs to be stored at 25C - i.e. not the glove box. I think a small chilly bin/styrofoam lined box would be the go.

 

Storing the EpiPen® Auto-Injector

 

EpiPen® and EpiPen Jr® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors should be stored in the carrier tube provided at a temperature of 25ºC (77ºF); however, temperature excursions between 15ºC and 30ºC (59ºF to 86ºF) are permitted.1 EpiPen® and EpiPen Jr® Auto-Injectors should not be stored in refrigerators or in a vehicle’s glove box.1 EpiPen® Auto-Injectors should not be exposed to extreme heat or cold2 and should be protected from light.

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I was walking through our hallway towards our bedroom last night when i walked over a dead bee which was lying there smack in the middle of the carpet. The old stinger got me in my big toe and it hurt like hell. 2 minutes later my hands started itching like mad, then my shoulder and neck, my whole body was suddenly covered in hives and my lips started to feel numb, like after an injection at the dentist. We rung an ambulance and decided to walk to the road since we are living in a rural location without street lights and our entrance is not easy to find. Before leaving the house i grabbed the epipen which we had purchased for the eventual visitor that might be allergic to bee stings. I remember giving it to Olaf and then i collapsed. Olaf carried me to the road with difficulties. He now says there is some urgent need for me to loose some weight... (Very funny)

On the way he jabed me with the epipen. I can't remember it. In the past we always had some andrenalin in the house to be administered with a sirenge and needle (just in case). Lots cheaper but last night that just wouldn't have done the trick. Not in total darkness and when panicking.

So here we are, without this epipen i very likely would not be here today. Had to stay in the hospital until 4 this morning and then got steroids and antihistamine for the next few days. The doctor warned us saying next time the reaction could be even more severe. (Not sure how it can be any worse then what it was).

I have had bee stings before, the last one a few weeks ago. I am gutted. Not sure what to do with our hives now. Having 100,000 + bees around our home is not comforting for me right now.

 

I found a pharmacy that sells epipen for $120 incl freight - i think it is worth it. They now last between 15-18 months. Link comming, just have to look it up again.

 

Allergypharmacy.co.nz they are in queenstown, found them through google.

 

Really good story. Thank you. Sorry for yourself having to go through it. But a good reminder for the nature and risks of the industry we're in. One of our workers had a similar incident earlier this year. He's since had to resign.

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Wow... sobering story... my wife is a volley for st John and you do learn that an ambulance can be busy a long way away at times and the wait can be very long..... people think that an ambulance is going to magically appear when you need them.... also learned recently that epi pens are cheap in the UK etc but here a different story... a matter of what the government chooses to subsidise/import and from where.

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I was walking through our hallway towards our bedroom last night when i walked over a dead bee which was lying there smack in the middle of the carpet. The old stinger got me in my big toe and it hurt like hell. 2 minutes later my hands started itching like mad, then my shoulder and neck, my whole body was suddenly covered in hives and my lips started to feel numb, like after an injection at the dentist. We rung an ambulance and decided to walk to the road since we are living in a rural location without street lights and our entrance is not easy to find. Before leaving the house i grabbed the epipen which we had purchased for the eventual visitor that might be allergic to bee stings. I remember giving it to Olaf and then i collapsed. Olaf carried me to the road with difficulties. He now says there is some urgent need for me to loose some weight... (Very funny)

On the way he jabed me with the epipen. I can't remember it. In the past we always had some andrenalin in the house to be administered with a sirenge and needle (just in case). Lots cheaper but last night that just wouldn't have done the trick. Not in total darkness and when panicking.

So here we are, without this epipen i very likely would not be here today. Had to stay in the hospital until 4 this morning and then got steroids and antihistamine for the next few days. The doctor warned us saying next time the reaction could be even more severe. (Not sure how it can be any worse then what it was).

I have had bee stings before, the last one a few weeks ago. I am gutted. Not sure what to do with our hives now. Having 100,000 + bees around our home is not comforting for me right now.

 

I found a pharmacy that sells epipen for $120 incl freight - i think it is worth it. They now last between 15-18 months. Link comming, just have to look it up again.

 

Allergypharmacy.co.nz they are in queenstown, found them through google.

Thanks for posting your experience. Was enough to motivate me to go ahead and purchase. Procrastination does not have the desired outcome when it really counts. Pleased you are still here to tell your story :)

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How right you are. And welcome to the forum!

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Please correct me if I am wrong here but I think you need consent from your employee before you stick a needle in him/her so to carry an epipen would be the employee's responsibility? Having an epipen in the car is a good idea I think (as long as it doesn't get to hot) but you may have to get your staff to sign a consent form or something like that. Gotta love H&S :cautious:

 

My understanding is unless you are a qualified medical personel you can not give anyone any form of medication. But asking their consent you can assist the person.

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My understanding is unless you are a qualified medical personel you can not give anyone any form of medication. But asking their consent you can assist the person.

I believe there is an exclusion for epi pens and asthma inhalers

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I would expect any beekeeping employee would have signed a consent form for an epipen or they would have no job

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I wouldn't worry about consent if someone was having anaphylaxis in front of me! Just do it

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My understanding is unless you are a qualified medical personel you can not give anyone any form of medication. But asking their consent you can assist the person.

 

Good Samaritan laws generally provide basic legal protection for those who assist a person who is injured or in danger. In essence, these laws protect the “Good Samaritan” from liability if unintended consequences result from their assistance.

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Epipens have increased in price by 700% in the USA. Mylan say they have no plans to increase the price here. Yet

 

If you have allergic people in the family having some adrenaline and needles at home is perfectly ok. Many parents of allergic children have been taught to use adrenaline with a needle

 

The dosage is simple, but you need to be taught how to give the injection. If you see your GP you could be taught and given a prescription for adrenaline and syringes to have at home. At prescription prices not $120-$200

 

I would really recommend desensitisation injections for anyone who does have anaphylaxis, it could save a life. The children of beekeepers have higher rates of bee anaphylaxis than the general population. Protect those kids

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