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Suspected Poisoning of Bees


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@Kiwifruiter those are good points and are the same points that have been troubling me since this was first made public.

 

Just last week I heard someone (not a beekeeper) recommending fipronil in jam to another party to control wasps. Needless to say I've now put them both straight - but it does make me wonder how often this happens? Given the points above and the time of year, I wouldn't be surprised if this is an "accidental" bee poisoning, where the primary target was actually wasps.

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@Kiwifruiter those are good points and are the same points that have been troubling me since this was first made public.

 

Just last week I heard someone (not a beekeeper) recommending fipronil in jam to another party to control wasps. Needless to say I've now put them both straight - but it does make me wonder how often this happens? Given the points above and the time of year, I wouldn't be surprised if this is an "accidental" bee poisoning, where the primary target was actually wasps.

In hind sight, I have had conformation that it is almost certainly deliberate. As sad as that fact is.

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I would agree with you both if we were talking about an urban area but not in a rural valley with bees all through it and even more dodgy if there's no houses nearby

Exactly. I had a look on google earth and there simply isn't anything that would give a member of the public a reason to be there let alone control somebody else's wasp population.

 

 

But why? Given that the area wasnt full with manuka, and he is a breeder not a honey producer, unless he had a business deal go very sour (I dont know the guy, I cant judge that) I simply cant see a motive. Unless it is a complete retard, which is always possible.

I no longer stand by this opnian and would delete if I could.:crap::crap::crap:

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What makes me wonder MPI only tested for 2 known toxins that could kill bees.

The first 2 that come to mind are 'Pyrethrum'/'Pyrethroid' and Fipronil. But what about the stuff Auckland council is spraying on verges and along fences? A mixture of Glyphosate and insecticide to kill ants? What about Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) or Imidacloprid?

The list is almost endless...

Insecticide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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One thing doesn't quite add up to me is the ongoing claim that the bees were poisoned by another beekeeper in the territory who doesn't want the competition. Thing with that if true, it would narrow the field down to just a few beekeepers and a high risk of being identified. Seems like there is no proof to this theory either as cause of death has not been established so could have been anything there are many ways for bees to get poisoned.

 

In my young days in the South Island back when people could be a bit gung ho with poison I saw at least a couple of incidences of bee yards getting poisoned and the most likely culprit would have been a nearby farmer mis applying some insecticides, as memory serves nothing was ever proved.

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One thing doesn't quite add up to me is the ongoing claim that the bees were poisoned by another beekeeper in the territory who doesn't want the competition. Thing with that if true, it would narrow the field down to just a few beekeepers and a high risk of being identified. Seems like there is no proof to this theory either as cause of death has not been established so could have been anything there are many ways for bees to get poisoned.

 

In my young days in the South Island back when people could be a bit gung ho with poison I saw at least a couple of incidences of bee yards getting poisoned and the most likely culprit would have been a nearby farmer mis applying some insecticides, as memory serves nothing was ever proved.

You can tell by the pattern of destruction.

 

Plus, I kinda think the beek in question knows his stuff :-)

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Keeping bees in a rural valley with mainly bush and farmland I would expect the incidence of poisoning on that scale to be extremely low.

 

Only time we have ever had mass poisoning was during pollination.

 

If it was done by someone with bees in the same valley I would imagine the poisoning would be done manually like a squirt of flyspray in the entrance rather than putting out poison laced syrup that your own bees would have access too.

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If it was done by someone with bees in the same valley I would imagine the poisoning would be done manually like a squirt of flyspray in the entrance rather than putting out poison laced syrup that your own bees would have access too.

Rather a large task to go around 300 mating Nucs and 30 hives without beeing seen. But in a remote, uninhabited valley I suppose everything is possible.

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Very interesting that most of the damaged colonies were "mating nucleus hives". I imagine these small colonies would be very sensitive to environmental poisoning. They simply wouldn't have the numbers to bounce back. The numbers also suggest something broadcast into the area rather than administered to each hive individually. Visiting 300+ hives would be very risky for the perpetrator. All supposition, of course.

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Rather a large task to go around 300 mating Nucs and 30 hives without beeing seen. But in a remote, uninhabited valley I suppose everything is possible.

 

Keeping bees in a rural valley with mainly bush and farmland I would expect the incidence of poisoning on that scale to be extremely low.

 

Only time we have ever had mass poisoning was during pollination.

 

If it was done by someone with bees in the same valley I would imagine the poisoning would be done manually like a squirt of flyspray in the entrance rather than putting out poison laced syrup that your own bees would have access too.

It would be very easy to observe if there is an epicenter of the poisoning.... And I get the feeling that there are beeks out there thick enough to risk their own hives poisoning sombody else's...

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When trying to make sense of a potentially criminal act one needs to be careful not to restrict their thinking to personal logic.

One persons logic can be another's magic.

One persons Democracy can be another's perceived Police State.

In this case, if the cause does turn out to be deliberate, I wouldn't be jumping to any conclusions related to competitive or commercial motives.

It may be a lot more pathetic than that.

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When trying to make sense of a potentially criminal act one needs to be careful not to restrict their thinking to personal logic.

One persons logic can be another's magic.

One persons Democracy can be another's perceived Police State.

In this case, if the cause does turn out to be deliberate, I wouldn't be jumping to any conclusions related to competitive or commercial motives.

It may be a lot more pathetic than that.

Trump being the perfect example of all this. (y)

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If I could get $150,000 for 12 to 20 hives and 300 baby nucs I'd be selling. All the same this is the guys living so there's projected earnings as well plus he may have lost breeder stock.

 

What could be worse is if it really is malicious, not knowing if the guy could do it again.

 

Pretty sure if a paddock full of cattle were poisoned there would be a national outcry plus a very serious police investigation.

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If I could get $150,000 for 12 to 20 hives and 300 baby nucs I'd be selling. All the same this is the guys living so there's projected earnings as well plus he may have lost breeder stock.

 

What could be worse is if it really is malicious, not knowing if the guy could do it again.

 

Pretty sure if a paddock full of cattle were poisoned there would be a national outcry plus a very serious police investigation.

Too right, I'd be upset if my cattle were deliberately poisoned and expect some police action but I would hope the headline would read "What killed 20 cattle?" rather than "what killed $15000 worth of cattle?"

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Too right, I'd be upset if my cattle were deliberately poisoned and expect some police action but I would hope the headline would read "What killed 20 cattle?" rather than "what killed $15000 worth of cattle?"

The initial reports were the no.'s lost

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What part of the crimes act (or any act) would a beehive crime be prosecuted under? Just wondering what the burden of proof might be. If we knew that then perhaps there are things we could do in the normal course of beekeeping that would assist in providing proof if the worst happens.

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