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The growth of unskilled commercial operators

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Another reason why foreigners are hired for seasonal work is that they don't get paid Kiwisaver.

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I think we all know it can be challenging to employ or train New Zealanders. But is it a good solution for the country to employ many overseas workers?? Shouldn't the corporate make an example and made an effort to employ/train New Zealanders even if it can be more difficult? Why are Watson and Son keep growing their business like Emperors to the expense of local beekeepers to push their corporate model take-over when they can't even make a proper effort to enhance their business model. Their boss talks about taonga, maoridom and all sorts yet look at their business model and track record...How does employing a majority of Filipinos and pushing local beekeepers out supposed to help Maori and NZ??

 

 

Lots of accusations flying around in this topic. We've removed some of the worst unfounded ones, but a reminder that your comments are public an you are responsible for the liability of your own claims and some of you need to start backing them up with evidence.

Yeah maybe not 100% Filipino labour that was an exaggeration but they certainly trying hard to push other beeks out, and I'm talking about beeks that are respectful and pay their landowners well...

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I think we all know it can be challenging to employ or train New Zealanders.

How right you are. I've worked on my own for 30 years for that very reason.

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How right you are. I've worked on my own for 30 years for that very reason.

Maby you didn't pay enough....

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Nope, it was all to do with my allergy to supervision.

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Nope, it was all to do with my allergy to supervision.

i have noticed that you have an independent thought process

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Very interesting...Coming from a Filipino, yes the pay that a Filipino receives in NZ is much bigger compared to the wages in the Philippines. I believe if you will treat your employee with the respect he deserves he will surely stay.

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I think we all know it can be challenging to employ or train New Zealanders. But is it a good solution for the country to employ many overseas workers?? Shouldn't the corporate make an example and made an effort to employ/train New Zealanders

Our branch is staffed mostly by kiwis (and all of them are on permanent contracts except two in the extraction room and a couple of casual older "yard-men"), except the Queen Unit that is mostly Europeans. We are trying to do our best to train kiwis.

 

Very interesting...Coming from a Filipino, yes the pay that a Filipino receives in NZ is much bigger compared to the wages in the Philippines. I believe if you will treat your employee with the respect he deserves he will surely stay.
I agree, many of our seasonal Eastern Europeans are on their second or third year with us
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I wonder how many people are forgetting the number of young kiwis who have gone overseas to earn better money with the aim of coming back with money/experiences....

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I wonder how many people are forgetting the number of young kiwis who have gone overseas to earn better money with the aim of coming back with money/experiences....

Yeah, my wife and I went to the UK for a year or two (ended up being 10) and paid our first house off

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Yeah, my wife and I went to the UK for a year or two (ended up being 10) and paid our first house off

And of my friends who are over there get crap for 'stealing jobs' and 'undercutting locals'... So I guess it's a bit like the whole global village concept....

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I can tell you finding good staff is a problem in Logistics as well. I was talking to the owner of a warehouse I use, he was saying that he recently hired a number of school leavers to work in the warehouse. They all had 7th form NCEA.

 

He couldn't believe how poorly some of them read and wrote, and their maths was atrocious. He said if successfully finish school but cannot find rack 9, bay H, level 2 after being shown a couple of times, there is something very wrong with our schools.

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@Jezza if the most important subject in primary and intermediate schools is art then do not be surprised with the result.

My son is 8th grade and the teacher is reading a book to the class - she proudly showed me the book at the parent-teacher meeting a week ago. WHATTTTT????? 8th grade at the kindergarten level? The teacher is reading to the class?

When I was in 7th grade I had to read books and the teacher randomly asked us to tell the story step by step while in the 8th grade we had to write basic essays about the books we had to read(compulsory).

Also my son learns maths at the level I learnt in 4th and 5th grade. In 2nd grade I had to solve written maths problems. That is real schooling not painting and drawing.

And here is the most painful part: MY SON IS ABOVE NATIONAL STANDARDS IN EVERYTHING - MATHS, READING, WRITHING.

 

So @Jezza tell to your friend next time to ask the young applicants for that job to draw and paint something on the warehouse's wall. They will probably do a good job.

 

There are good schools in major cities in few subdistricts however if you can not afford to live there your child is not entitled to attend those schools - straight forward, right?

 

And why is the system like this? FOR SELF PROTECTION.

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We can't possibly hurt little hummus feeling because he is a cabbage....

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I can tell you finding good staff is a problem in Logistics as well. I was talking to the owner of a warehouse I use, he was saying that he recently hired a number of school leavers to work in the warehouse. They all had 7th form NCEA.

 

He couldn't believe how poorly some of them read and wrote, and their maths was atrocious. He said if successfully finish school but cannot find rack 9, bay H, level 2 after being shown a couple of times, there is something very wrong with our schools.

You can get a degree in journalism without being able to spell.

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Schools in my view cop a lot of flack that rightly should be directed to parents who are too busy/idle/uninterested/think it's school's job etc to involve themselves in reading writing arithmetic at home.

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Schools in my view cop a lot of flack that rightly should be directed to parents who are too busy/idle/uninterested/think it's school's job etc to involve themselves in reading writing arithmetic at home.

The parents of these kids may not know any better. And you are right, some don't or can't help. The only place that has a chance of reaching everyone and making sure they have the basics is the school.

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Schools in my view cop a lot of flack that rightly should be directed to parents who are too busy/idle/uninterested/think it's school's job etc to involve themselves in reading writing arithmetic at home.

Well said.

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Criticising parents does not help the children.

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I agree, parents somehow need to be encouraged.

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People should think of themselfs as 'home teachers' more and as 'parents' less. As a cello teacher who can teach young kids (age 3 onwards) you don't teach the student, you teach the parent to teach the child at home.

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My Mum is a retired ESOL teacher. I'm thinking of asking her if she will split home schooling duties with me when my boy gets a bit older.

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Unfortunately you are correct @Kiwifruiter.

You take your child to swimming lessons for 4-5 years to make sure he/she learns to swim. One swimming lesson is 25 minutes and is not cheap. Total waste of time.

 

Back to schools. Last year my wife fall to an add and she went to a West Auckland tutorial company for kids. Fortunately I arrived there just in time. I arrived by the time when my children were assessed and obviously they were under the national standards so my wife was encouraged to enroll both kids for 1 hour english and 1 hour maths(total 4 hours per week).

They were teaching the kids with a software and the teachers were Uni students. The software was similar to any other software you can use at home online(solve one step and play a small game as a reward....... very sad). My son said as the all assessment was easy and boring. My wife was about to enroll the kids when I decided to think till next day.

After I reassessed the whole tutorial program it was obvious as it was not worth it. They asked for those 4 hours $200(weekly, for several weeks). Do not worry as they were fully booked by asians.

 

After you grown up learning every subject from national manuals(from the first year to 12th grade) it is hard to accept a crap education system. I mean by national manuals as every student used the same manuals regardless as some were attending a school in the richest subdistrict of the city or others who attended a school from the poorest village. Same manuals for all student(by age/year). The parents knew exactly what page is the child learning at the time. The parent followed easily and closely the child with his/her progress and was easy to help with the homework.

 

I have no idea sometimes what exactly my son learns because he does not receive any book, or ...... what ever. I can no follow his progress and I can no prepare myself for the next step because I do not know what is the next step.

My son is 8th grade and he does not have subjects like history, geography, biology, science, chemistry.... but they are doing a lot of art.

What a great education system and we expect great general/basic knowledge.

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My Mum is a retired ESOL teacher. I'm thinking of asking her if she will split home schooling duties with me when my boy gets a bit older.

It is VERY worth doing! A few of my cello students have been home schoolers... Taking advantage of online resources (online classes are mint for stuff you are not very good at) plus curriculum available means you (as a parent) can either achieve the same as a normal school on around 3 hours per day or do the equivalent of around 2.5 years worth of public education per year of homeschool. There are a few disadvantages tho. It is a full time job for somebody. This means (unless you can rope in a grand parent) you need to survive on one income... The other big disadvantage is it is very VERY hard to go back into a public school. My current homeschoolers looked at putting the youngest (miss 12) into public school for something different... Until they found out that academically she could have passed NCEA level 3... As a 12 year old... So be prepared for the long hall and kids who could well end up being like doctors and stuff.

 

Unfortunately you are correct @Kiwifruiter.

You take your child to swimming lessons for 4-5 years to make sure he/she learns to swim. One swimming lesson is 25 minutes and is not cheap. Total waste of time.

 

Back to schools. Last year my wife fall to an add and she went to a West Auckland tutorial company for kids. Fortunately I arrived there just in time. I arrived by the time when my children were assessed and obviously they were under the national standards so my wife was encouraged to enroll both kids for 1 hour english and 1 hour maths(total 4 hours per week).

They were teaching the kids with a software and the teachers were Uni students. The software was similar to any other software you can use at home online(solve one step and play a small game as a reward....... very sad). My son said as the all assessment was easy and boring. My wife was about to enroll the kids when I decided to think till next day.

After I reassessed the whole tutorial program it was obvious as it was not worth it. They asked for those 4 hours $200(weekly, for several weeks). Do not worry as they were fully booked by asians.

 

After you grown up learning every subject from national manuals(from the first year to 12th grade) it is hard to accept a crap education system. I mean by national manuals as every student used the same manuals regardless as some were attending a school in the richest subdistrict of the city or others who attended a school from the poorest village. Same manuals for all student(by age/year). The parents knew exactly what page is the child learning at the time. The parent followed easily and closely the child with his/her progress and was easy to help with the homework.

 

I have no idea sometimes what exactly my son learns because he does not receive any book, or ...... what ever. I can no follow his progress and I can no prepare myself for the next step because I do not know what is the next step.

My son is 8th grade and he does not have subjects like history, geography, biology, science, chemistry.... but they are doing a lot of art.

What a great education system and we expect great general/basic knowledge.

I agree that there needs to be arts and creativity in schools... But not at the expense of core subjects. And as you mention, coaching etc needs to be done by a parent (if at all possible)....

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a lot of successful entrepreneurs never did well at school but they had good people skills and were able to employ the talents of people who did.

with the development of robots and AI and 3D printing it could be the people with creative abilities who will thrive.

maybe kids should be learning to do stuff a robot can not do, singing and dancing and painting etc.

people may be paid to consume , to keep the system going, when there are no jobs.

it could be seen as a dumbing down.

by that measure dumbing down started along time ago when one compares the really dense and dry texts that children in the late 1800 had to learn at school.

just as printing changed information sharing from an oral bias the development of visual media is changing the emphasis again.

it may not be the world we like or the one we are used to but our grandchildren who are born into it will find it perfectly ok.

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