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Assure Quality Inspection


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Also while I consider it is polite to inform the beekeeper that an inspection is about to be carried out, it is not required. It has been know for beekeepers to move hives before hand so in some areas the first you will know you have been inspected is when you open the lid of your hive and find the advice note

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I got no problem with random inspections i carry them out myself but i do have a problem if someone was to put something in my hives with out permission that would really get me going and i would fight that to the end.

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If you wish to fight, over to you. I'm not going to get into an online debate over anything like that. But I'll say, inspections are for the good of the industry and may be carried out with or without cooperation of the hive owner, we don't fight over it, just do it.

However if there is a valid objection, it will be considered.

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Like i said i have no problem with inspections and like i said i carry out these random inspections on other hives myself but i would not put anything into anybody else's hive and so in return would not be happy if someone did that to me

 

I get that its for the greater good but im not sure how the rule came about that someone has the right to stick something into someone else's hive without permission.

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Inspections on my hives are welcome at any time. It's residual chemicals I don't want, especially in an area where no chemicals have ever been used. Once we have to start treating for mites, I guess that objection won't apply so much.

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Not sure its the same at all i can not remember at any time any authority coming onto the farm and drenching,vaccinating, testing without permission, Tb is a compulsory programme bit like control of AFB it does not require non- permitted use of antibiotics pesticides or culling whatever without notification of the owner unless its a real bad problem and the owner is truly absent, and has had warnings to fix problems. The only instance i can think of that you really have no control over is foot and mouth.

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Ooh thanks you guys. I know of a big afb problem in chch at the moment so may be able to find out some more from that. I am probably mid way between the two outbreak sites.

 

I've heard of a case of AFB in the port hills buts thats it. Where are you located Grant? Can you give me more detail about this outbreak?

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I've heard of a case of AFB in the port hills buts thats it. Where are you located Grant? Can you give me more detail about this outbreak?

Cashmere Hills/Kennedy's Bush area and Okuti Valley. Apparently they were de-registered abandoned hives.

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Personaly speaking, when I am officialy and politly informed I will always do my best to understand and then comply as quickly as I can. What gets me hot under the collar is when some official is blunt, rude, dosen't take the time to politly explain and only uses their powers (granted to do their job). When they forget to treat me with respect as an equal human being, I start treating them with the distain they deserve.

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I'm trying to remember back but with my advanced age it gets harder every year.

 

I'm reasonably sure we used Bayvarol down here for testing when Varroa was first found.

 

We wouldn't have apistan in our hives and Bayvarol does exactly the same thing with exactly the same results.

 

When we had the varroa workshops we were told by Mark Goodwin to stay away from Apistan as it was an over the top treatment and had big residue problems.

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If you have a DECA do they still do random checks? Everyone treats their bees differently, when I have hives I wouldn't like someone poking around and putting in nasty chemicals to leave residues in my wax and that are to be disposed of in 'an approved chemical waste site' sounds a bit dodgy to me...

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If you have a DECA do they still do random checks? ...

 

Yes they do do random checks and its a good thing for the industry, most likely that nearly all on this site and probably nearly all bar a few bee keepers in general will agree its for the greater good ( those few probably the ones with problems).

 

As far as i know you more than likely get AFB check with no warning it will just be a note left under your lid, there should be nothing added to your hive on this inspection and you should find it exactly how you left it, when i do the AFB check i don't ring around we just pick a day and do it. But for pest inspection i would expect you get notified

 

From what I'm understanding with Pest inspection that they ( higher authorities don't shoot the inspectors here they just doing a job) have the right to potentially treat your hive with there chosen treatment and potentially without permission.

When i get a bit more time i will follow this up, cause it's this part that doesn't sit well with me.

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Tracheal mites are microscopic and would be sampled by taking a sample of live bees.

 

Sample of bees have gone off for tracheal mites and a sticky board has gone in for hive beetle ...

 

I was taught to do tracheal mites in the field, anyone do that here?

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do you do this DJC ? how many heads do you need to detach before you notice a problem or is it if you get it you really get it? excuse my ignorance i honestly can't be bothered looking into it at the moment life a bit crazy at the moment, over committed if there was a time for cloning now would be a good time.:)

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I've done half a dozen bees one time out of curiosity to see how it worked, and what I should be looking for in healthy bees. Of course, nothing found.

 

It's one of those awkward things I guess - how much time do you spend looking for something that isn't supposed to be here.

 

Just did a bit of a search to refresh my memory as to why you might consider testing for tracheal mites. Hive failing to thrive, K-wing, tremors, dysentery. Those symptoms can as easily fit other things of course, but it would be worthwhile if you did have a hive displaying those symptoms to at least do a quick field check for tracheal mites. Never know - you might be the first to find them... dubious honour there.

 

There's a good video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv4zzGv_x_Q

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Thanks DJC , I would always be sus if i noticed any thing a bit out of norm just wanting to get a feeling what the perception out there was, again one of the beauty's of this forum informations at hand, thanks for the vid , i'll watch it later got some document i need to read but really not up to it, My kids laugh when i say i got home work to do they think they the only one's:rofl:

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I find it very surprising that any inspection is allowed to take place without the knowledge of the beekeeper and/or landowner. Beekeepers generally have an understanding with landowners with regards to access to hives but this does not usually include anyone else and as a beekeeper I would always ask the landowner if it is okay for other people to come and look at the bees with me, let alone without me.

I'm all for the exotic disease screening programme around ports but beekeepers need to be notified in advance. In the last day I've heard from two beekeepers in Dunedin whose hives have been inspected - in both cases there happened to be someone home at the property who asked what was going on. For me this is only going to upset people. I actually look after the bees for one of these beekeepers and had screened them for Varroa using Bayvarol and sticky boards last week. A courtesy phone call would also give the inspector valuable information with regards to hive history and checks that the beekeeper has performed recently.

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