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Alex

Oxalic acid strips

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I think that some of you may find this link useful, it's a conversation about the use of oxalic acid dissolved in glycerine and applied to cardboard strips. The source that is mentioned is from a renowned bee keeper from Argentina. I will try it next week.

VARROA JACOBSONI : natural methods to fight it. | TECA

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We do not have Varroa Jacobsoni. We have Varroa Destructor. Big difference

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We do not have Varroa Jacobsoni. We have Varroa Destructor. Big difference

If you read the part were the Argentinean beekeeper talks about oxalic acid it doesn't say that it's for v. Jacobsoni, oxalic acid is used to control v. Destructor in several ways. Randy Oliver quotes a paper that refers to the use of oxalic acid and glycerine on his website

 

Oxalic acid Powerpoint presentation @ Scientific Beekeeping

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If you read the part were the Argentinean beekeeper talks about oxalic acid it doesn't say that it's for v. Jacobsoni, oxalic acid is used to control v. Destructor in several ways. Randy Oliver quotes a paper that refers to the use of oxalic acid and glycerine on his website

 

Oxalic acid Powerpoint presentation @ Scientific Beekeeping

Why don't you search all the NZ based topics on oxalic on the forum first?

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Why don't you search all the NZ based topics on oxalic on the forum first?

Sorry, I couldn't find anything about the use of glycerol with oxalic, I just thought that the information could be useful. There is really good information on the forum about the use of oxalic, if someone is interested in a different application it could help regardless were its been used. I've found that some information about the ways of beekeeping in some other places is useful here.

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Most of what I'm reading suggests oxalic and glycerine decomposes to form formic acid at temperature. The first topic you posted has a lot of input from Africa and Australia. The latter post has input from the US. All locations have high summer temperatures that would evaporate the solution and thus form formic acid.

 

The notes also have this to say:

we received several advice from beekeepers which found different levels of bee death because adding strips in cooler areas of the South Hemisphere.

 

IT SEEMS that with low temperatures the bees are sucking the wetted strips looking for water and they dying.

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