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So called because they are in close contact with the bees these are great for feeding small nucs. They can be made out of nothing for no money. Here are two examples, on a nuc, and used in a commercial pollination setting (in a kiwifruit orchard). More often they are invisible, protected inside an empty box. Any air-tight bucket, jar, or sandwich-box will do - a few ball-point sized holes in the lid (10-20) and you're good to go. Or you can make it nicely - like these.

 

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pollen_contact_fdr.jpg.7ca61d816a5d4e78ed268a4adc79e8a1.jpg

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Gidday Dave,

 

Just looking at these feeding setups...um where do the bees get feed from? I see you put holes in lid of bucket,so is there then a hole in box lid for the feed to go into hive?

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Gidday Dave,

 

Just looking at these feeding setups...um where do the bees get feed from? I see you put holes in lid of bucket,so is there then a hole in box lid for the feed to go into hive?

Phil. The bees come up through a hole in the hive mat. The inverted bucket is sitting over that hole, the bees come up through the hole and suck the syrup from the tiny (1mm) holes in the lid. A Full depth box sits over the feeder. If left exposed to the sun the expansion in the bucket would pump the syrup into the hive creating a terrible mess and attract robbing bees/wasps, hence the need for a cover box (not pictured).

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