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Goran

How long is the Australian season?

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I didn't want to open a new thread.

I hope can ask here:

Beekeeping season start at your place from August till April? Do you know in Australia how it goes ( someone told me or I read 10 months..?). I meant for commercial beekeeping important. I hope I ask this properly..

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@Dennis C Earnshaw may be able to answer for Western Australia.

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@Goran, Australia is very big and they do beekeeping everywhere.

In Southern Australia they have a little bit the same weather like we do here in North NZ. However the more you go north the warmer the climate is.

And Yes in some parts of AUS the bk season will last around 10months - as far as I know.

 

PS - it is like asking how long the bk season is in Europe.

Hmmm, where in Europe? Southern Spain(Andalusia) or Northern Poland?

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@dansar The migratory commercial beekeepers in Western Australia would say their season starts around the beginning of the month of July when hives begin to work the various types of Banksia in the Beekeepers Nature Reserve, situated on the coast west of the town of Eneabba, which is north of our capital city Perth. This reserve also serves as a "wintering site", during the cold months May, June & July. The area is close to the Indian Ocean and enjoys the warmth coming off the tropical Leeuwin ocean current flowing south and although the bees are "wintered" the hives maintain a solid working brood cluster and quickly expand again as the days start to get longer. Our season comes to an end in April at the conclusion of the Marri (Redum) flow, the last of this flowering occurs around the Gingin shire, from there the hives are taken north to the Beekeepers Nature Reserve for the winter months of May, June, July and early August.

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Thank You all for your replies. It is very interesting.

At my place usually first work with frames at beginning of April, last if any flow for extraction was August ( this didn't happen recently due climate changes and devastating droughts in summer). At my microlocation I start preparing colonies for winter end of July / beginning of August. If something left I missed, I correct in September.

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I live in desert country in Western Australia. We have cold, dry winters, and very hot dry summers, with rain co ing sporadically through the year. We can start extracting honey in September, and might go through until April or so. Local commercial guys move their bees south to the coast for the warmer winter, but I'm just a hobbyist so I don't bother.

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I was in Adelaide recently and visited the honey house in the Adelaide hills, great little shop and beekeeper owner operator family. The lady there told me they have a six or seven month season and expect 100 kg per hive with good hives producing 120kg or more

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@dansar The migratory commercial beekeepers in Western Australia would say their season starts around the beginning of the month of July when hives begin to work the various types of Banksia in the Beekeepers Nature Reserve, situated on the coast west of the town of Eneabba, which is north of our capital city Perth. This reserve also serves as a "wintering site", during the cold months May, June & July. The area is close to the Indian Ocean and enjoys the warmth coming off the tropical Leeuwin ocean current flowing south and although the bees are "wintered" the hives maintain a solid working brood cluster and quickly expand again as the days start to get longer. Our season comes to an end in April at the conclusion of the Marri (Redum) flow, the last of this flowering occurs around the Gingin shire, from there the hives are taken north to the Beekeepers Nature Reserve for the winter months of May, June, July and early August.

This sounds like the perfect breeding environment for Varroa.

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This sounds like the perfect breeding environment for Varroa.

The climate here does?

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This sounds like the perfect breeding environment for Varroa.

 

But they do not have varroa....... yet.

 

Australia is huge and migratory bkpers can make a lot more(eucalyptus gives a big honey crop).

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Australia is huge and migratory bkpers can make a lot more(eucalyptus gives a big honey crop).

Conversely; large areas are essentially mono-cultural with just a few species of plant or tree that produce a honey flow, sometimes at irregular intervals of multiple years.

This limits the viability of non-migratory beekeeping and requires the migratory/commercial folk to spend a lot of time and kilometres scoping out territory and/or taking some big risks in their moves.

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Conversely; large areas are essentially mono-cultural with just a few species of plant or tree that produce a honey flow, sometimes at irregular intervals of multiple years.

This limits the viability of non-migratory beekeeping and requires the migratory/commercial folk to spend a lot of time and kilometres scoping out territory and/or taking some big risks in their moves.

Sounds like fun

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Ahh but what about the full body search for Tics every day and being on the lookout for snakes and poisonous spiders as you go about your work :(

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@frazzledfozzle Well since you mentioned the hazards of a beekeeper working in the Aussie bush, Mosquitoes bites would be No 1 (sitting around the dull camp fire after dark, with no bee suite on with a can in one hand and potato chips in the other, and no way to defend ones self). No 2 bee stings in the hand during working hours, No 3 tick bites that extend for weeks after getting back home in places that we do not mention, and finally No 4,5 the bites of spiders and snakes that I've yet to experience. Life is full of fun.
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@frazzledfozzle Well since you mentioned the hazards of a beekeeper working in the Aussie bush, Mosquitoes bites would be No 1 (sitting around the dull camp fire after dark, with no bee suite on with a can in one hand and potato chips in the other, and no way to defend ones self). No 2 bee stings in the hand during working hours, No 3 tick bites that extend for weeks after getting back home in places that we do not mention, and finally No 4,5 the bites of spiders and snakes that I've yet to experience. Life is full of fun.

We all need a bit of risk in life - it makes things more interesting.

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Conversely; large areas are essentially mono-cultural with just a few species of plant or tree that produce a honey flow, sometimes at irregular intervals of multiple years.

This limits the viability of non-migratory beekeeping and requires the migratory/commercial folk to spend a lot of time and kilometres scoping out territory and/or taking some big risks in their moves.

Are there areas of Australia, like far north tablelands or wet tropics, that produce honey free of gum.

I recently brought some macadamia honey in adelaide and even that had overtones of gum.

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Are there areas of Australia, like far north tablelands or wet tropics, that produce honey free of gum.

I recently brought some macadamia honey in adelaide and even that had overtones of gum.

Sorry, never had such honey. How does it taste in the mouth? Some uncomfortable taste, or annoying "obstacle" in the mouth?

We have honeydew, it is strong with some " metalic" taste ( due to iron and other microelements as said..) but it is in scent not that something left in the mouth..

Thanks in advance for your reply.

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Gum tree is another name for the eucalyptus tree. So the honey tastes and smells like eucalyptus. To me it has a medicinal taste.

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Gum tree is another name for the eucalyptus tree. So the honey tastes and smells like eucalyptus. To me it has a medicinal taste.

So it is such scent.. I could imagine that would be also repulsive to me..

Thanks..

I started to write about ticks at us and rest, but it won't be about Australia so I won't spoil. :)

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So it is such scent.. I could imagine that would be also repulsive to me..

Thanks..

I started to write about ticks at us and rest, but it won't be about Australia so I won't spoil. :)

It's quite sweet and strong flavour , generally dark.

I never saw it on sale in supermarket as creamed honey.

It is not unpleasant but dominant.

I think a large gum tree in full flower would be a heavy producer

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I hope I would have chance to taste it one day. Now I am curious ( hope won't end as a cat :D)..

Regards..

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I hope I would have chance to taste it one day. Now I am curious ( hope won't end as a cat :D)..

Regards..

Gum is a good later season flow that I leave for the bees to eat over winter

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On 29/11/2016 at 3:36 AM, Janice said:

Gum tree is another name for the eucalyptus tree. So the honey tastes and smells like eucalyptus. To me it has a medicinal taste.

Australia is a very big country with wide range of climates and species of eucaliptus trees. The flavour of the honey from the various species is quite variable ranging from quite light in colour and mild flavours  though to dark and strong in flavour. Sometimes there is variables within a species, for example some jarrah honey is very nice in flavour however the high activity jarrah (medicinal) also tastes (in my view) a bit medicinal.  Have never found a eucalipt honey that tastes of eucaliptus, that is unless you munch on the leaves!

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