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Jezza

How is a high honey price detrimental to Beekeepers?

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Unless you are a commercial beekeeper of hobbyist who has been directly impacted by these type of people you wont understand what a detrimental impact they are having on our bees and our businesses.

 

Please help us understand. I believe you are mainly a Queen Breeder in Nelson?

 

If that's correct, how is the higher price for honey and demand for Queens detrimental to your business? Manuka is largely a North Island phenomenon, so the AFB and Varroa fall out if the manuka "bubble" bursts will largely bypass you, correct?

 

I'm honestly not trying to have a go, just trying to understand what the issue is.

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Same for me - we're somewhat off topic given the original post, but I would also like to understand what the direct impacts have been to date. We hear these alluded to quite a lot in these posts - perhaps it would be worth starting a new thread with some actual examples that have occurred? If we had actual examples, perhaps this would be instructional for new bee keepers - if you don't manage your bees correctly, this is what happens and this is the impact it has on people's livelihood. Then new beekeepers would better understand some of the issues and see how important it is to start slow, learn and build up.

 

By the way - I'm sure these examples can be given without naming names.

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Thank you for taking the time to type that up. Shows how a rapidly changing market on the North Island can have flow on effects to the South Island.

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the rule of thumb is primary produces make the least profit.

in beekeeping terms, even if honey prices stay the same, land owners will be taking more and more out of it, and so will middle men and retailers. the beeks themselves will be back to the old profit margins but with with all the extra problems.

 

the biggest impact is all the fly by nighters who will be shortcutting everything to maintain profit. disease control will go out the window and they will eventually wipe themselves out .......and those around them.

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Hmmmm...and the sky might fall or the apocalypse might start....

maybe lol

there is a lot of factors and there is things that industries can do.

 

 

are there examples of actual issues that are happening out there right now?

hives stolen

hives poisoned/burnt

high overstocking to the point no one gets a crop.

so over stocked they starve to death.

had guys spread afb through all their hives and wipe themselves and others out.

seen ones that have made varroa treatment mistakes and killed all hives.

do get some sites where mites are a problem, no doubt due to re-invasion from dead outs.

AFB so bad in areas they have to pull hives out otherwise everything gets it.

 

 

new beeks need to be challenged on whether they've actually thought this whole thing through.

thats the main thing. often their perception of beekeeping is a whole lot different from reality.

just need to poke them a bit to make them sit up and look around a bit more :)

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thats the main thing. often their perception of beekeeping is a whole lot different from reality.

just need to poke them a bit to make them sit up and look around a bit more :)

 

Yep, no argument there!

 

I guess it's how we make sure that happens that concerns me.

 

To some of the earlier posts stating that people are getting into beekeeping "just for the money" I have to admit, that's one of the reasons I started. Correct me if I'm wrong, but most people that go into a commercial venture, do so because they think they can make money out of it. There were also a whole lot of other reasons - the fact that I get to drive around farms instead of stare at a Computer and talk into a phone all day, the technical nature of beekeeping - it makes you think, being an outdoors type and also needing a job that has a level of physical exercise to it - good for the health. I don't really eat honey but enjoy mead too. Then you start working the bees, become addicted and if you're not working on them, read about them or spend your time chatting online about them. No doubt some of these reasons and any number of others apply to most newbies - I doubt many are getting into it solely for the money. There must be easier ways to make a buck surely.

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Is that your chosen profession then Adaire? :)

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I doubt many are getting into it solely for the money.

sadly there is. talk to a beek and all they talk of is bees. talk to these guys and its all $$$.

the other thing is driving force behind some of them. as some are bank rolled by money men. have heard of investors starting to itchy about getting a return on their investment.

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