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NZBF Results from my first honey harvest - crush and strain method

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I plan on using crush and strain for my first extract, thanks for the link.

 

The honey will likely crystallise I believe, but every batch is different. What I've been told is that when you have the filtered honey in your pot/bucket, etc. you add a bit of some store brought creamed honey. This gives your honey a stable crystal structure to build off. If you stir thoroughly and jar the honey before it's creams in your pot/bucket (making it almost impossible to get out) then it won't crystallise in the jar and you didn't have to heat it. I also believe you can heat honey to 40+ C before it affects the beneficial properties.

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The honey will likely crystallise I believe, but every batch is different.

Keep your honey on a high shelf in the kitchen. It's less likely to crystallize if it's kept warm.

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Keep your honey on a high shelf in the kitchen. It's less likely to crystallize if it's kept warm.

Yeah problem there is I also can't reach it !!

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Yeah problem there is I also can't reach it !!

Grandma was vertically challenged. She had one of those stools out of which two steps unfolded. Perfect for reaching uncrystallised pots of honey (y)

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I just wanted to let any beginners know how easy it is to harvest a couple of frames using the crush and strain method.

 

The information about testing for tutin by tasting it, has been removed. You will note the comment below when taken in context of the full post in its original format.

 

Note I'm not advising you to do this !

 

To promote tasting for tutin testing is highly irresponsible. More information is available Understanding the risks associated with Tutin Part 1

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I did my first frame by hand in the kitchen too but was surprised at how little mess there was. A couple of drops from where the frame overhung the pan I sat it in but other than that no mess. Was easy and so satisfying!

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Hi did my first C&S using two 20lt buckets I got from the local bakery so I know they are food grade and cheese cloth did 7 FD frames took half an hour very little mess because I used two cheep tarps to cover floor and table then put it in the back of my suv that had been sitting all day next morning all done I got 20kgs of honey EASY

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I did my first frame by hand in the kitchen too but was surprised at how little mess there was. A couple of drops from where the frame overhung the pan I sat it in but other than that no mess. Was easy and so satisfying!

wait until you have a few boxes to do, then we shall see if it gets messy ;)

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This is the way we handle our foundationless frames and find it works well. After crushing in a big bowl we use a stainless steel honey double strainer (med and fine openings) into a food grade bucket and a couple of days in the warm sun and it is done. Transfer into some waiting glass jars (or buckets if you like) and all done and ready for the next batch of crush and strain. Keep things simple I reckon (KISS).

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Hi all. This might not be the right place to put this topic so Admin can move it if necessary.

 

I just wanted to let any beginners know how easy it is to harvest a couple of frames using the crush and strain method. I followed the instructions that I found here:

No extractor, no problem - Honey Bee Suite

 

We just took out two frames as the main goal was to give the girls some more room. We used two big pots to take all the honeycomb. When we start doing more than 2 frames at once we will probably have to get some bigger pots, and evenutally a proper extractor, but in the meantime I am happy to do it this way again.

 

It is messy, sticky work; there was honey everywhere: on us, on the floor, down the sides of the pots, all over the stove and bench, everywhere I'd touched (taps, utensils, lids etc), but it's a pretty easy clean-up. Just make sure the windows are closed so you don't get any visitors coming to claim what you took from them!

 

In total, we extracted 2.3 kgs of gorgeous amber translucent honey from just two frames - I was amazed at how much we got. I don't know if it will crystallise in the future however I don't plan on heat-treating as I prefer the (alleged) health benefits of raw honey. We have stored it in assorted glass and food-grade plastic jars/containers.

 

Every time I eat it I feel such a sense of wonder that those little darlings in my front garden made something so delicious. Love it!!!!

 

Good work...

 

This is my first year of beekeeping, and I also crushed and strained.

 

There wasn't really too much excess honey in the hive as it took quite a while for it to get to a decent strength.

 

I did `liberate' 3 capped frames though.

 

My method:

 

Cut the comb out into a big metal pan.

Crushed it all with a potato masher.

Then suspended some cheese cloth over a food grade bucket.

Poured the crushed honey in.

Left it for a week.

I believe I harvested about 2.5-3 litres.

 

Very pleased with the quantity and quality.

 

Am hoping for at least 10 frames though this coming season as the bees are now going to have to redraw these frames, and I'd like to harvest enough frames, while still leaving the bees winter supplies, to justify renting a centrifuge to leave the drawn comb intact.

 

C

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If the honey is for your own use stainless varroa size mesh does an acceptable job of filtering debris, and takes hours rather than days. Any junk that gets through settles out on top.

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A large $2 shop sieve works well.

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i use an old bread knife with the blade bent into a right angle to scrape off cappings.

after that the bulk of the honey is carefully scrapped off [ so easy to go right down to the wire ] into a tray ,then poured into sieve

then the frames are put back in a bee box that is sitting over a clean plastic top feeder tray.

if it is sat in a warm/sunny place the frames will drain into the feeder

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I tried to spin a frame of Manuka today that I had since the Manuka session finished, will it exploded! I did notice the wax cells had some dried spots over them, not sure if I left it to late and the comb was weaker because of this? When I looked at the broken comb there was some whitish coloured cells with chystalised stuff in it, would this be chystalised uncapped honey? Of maybe willow dew honey? I have now crushed it up and straining it.

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i use an old bread knife with the blade bent into a right angle to scrape off cappings.

I have never done that, just scraped the whole lot as is.

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I have never done that, just scraped the whole lot as is.

i probably take more than just cappings.

but in the past i have ended up making big holes in perfectly good drawn frames so i do not go deep.

i have a really hot room and i leave the frames to drain.

i know some honey does not run so well but that generally gets fed back to bees.

of course not a problem for me this year with no honey.

however we have had a very heavy flowering of the red rata vine lately.

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On crystallisation I found the article at Why does honey crystallize? very helpful. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for the temperature chart. After putting our honey into glass jars we kept it in an old fridge set to about 5 degrees for two months while we were away. However, it has still gone semi-solid which I don't find to be a problem, as I prefer creamed honey on my freshly buttered toast anyway. My wife has also commandeered some of it and has a batch of honey mead brewing :):) It seems from the article that if the honey is higher in glucose than fructose it will crystallise faster. I guess it depends on the composition of the nectar the beez are gathering.:bee:

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