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I've had discussions with an engineering firm here in Taupo that I've had a long and substantial association with.

I've suggested that we develop a simple and inexpensive 100-200kg capacity trailer/ ute crane.

The crane would be a Davit type and would have a reach of say 4m.

Personally I doubt that this industry can move forward using manual lifting.

The reality is that in general, rules and penalties for injuries are getting stronger while smart, attractive labor prospects are getting smaller.

The days of employers exposing workers to heavy lifting are gone.

As this industry moves from the obscure and into mainstream, the closer the scrutiny will be in relation to the relevant Workplace safety Acts.

Id like to see small cranes with commercial beekeeping capacity priced at 5k.

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yeah things will go that way. honey supers are technically a two man lift. may spell the end for hive sites that you can't drive a vehicle right up to the hives.

also extraction setups will need to add lifting device as well to get supers from pallet to table/machine.

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yeah things will go that way. honey supers are technically a two man lift. may spell the end for hive sites that you can't drive a vehicle right up to the hives.

also extraction setups will need to add lifting device as well to get supers from pallet to table/machine.

There is already a pallet machine that is like a scissor jack that raises the pallet as the boxes are removed.

I bet they can be hired from forklift hire outfits.

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There is already a pallet machine that is like a scissor jack that raises the pallet as the boxes are removed.

I bet they can be hired from forklift hire outfits.

theres a few different things. seen box lifters that clamp to a box, lift it with a small electric winch and swing it over.

but its all $$$$.

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A simple solution is an old electric fork lift parked in the right place.

we have been toying with that.

instead of using pallet shifter use electric forklift and that doubles has hoist.

but down side is honey pallet is taller than the bench. forklift is no good for helping drop boxes down.

been toying with the idea of a small crane, possibly even a counter balance arm. how to mount it all is another issue.

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In the honey house these would probably be great. I bought 6 of them to use in our timber processing factory. Either crank by hand or there is a foot operated crank on it as well. they cost about $1k new. Cheaper than a forklift and will lift 1 tonne or more, depending on the model you get.

main-manual-stackers.png.40c66761473fcad33b06d38b8ef9d800.png

main-manual-stackers.png.40c66761473fcad33b06d38b8ef9d800.png

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In the honey house these would probably be great. I bought 6 of them to use in our timber processing factory. Either crank by hand or there is a foot operated crank on it as well. they cost about $1k new. Cheaper than a forklift and will lift 1 tonne or more, depending on the model you get.

Are the forks set wide enough for a pallet?

The photo appears to show a narrow machine?

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Are the forks set wide enough for a pallet?

The photo appears to show a narrow machine?

 

In the honey house these would probably be great. I bought 6 of them to use in our timber processing factory. Either crank by hand or there is a foot operated crank on it as well. they cost about $1k new. Cheaper than a forklift and will lift 1 tonne or more, depending on the model you get.

You need to use pallets that allow the wheels to drive in under the pallet. Most Chep pallets will work.

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You need to use pallets that allow the wheels to drive in under the pallet. Most Chep pallets will work.

I Didn't think of that but it would just mean that the conventional pallet would be placed on top of the wheelie fork pallet.

The wheelie fork pallet would never leave the honey house

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You need to use pallets that allow the wheels to drive in under the pallet. Most Chep pallets will work.

Yes, or put some bearers down on the ground to allow the wheels to go underneath the pallet. They are a really awesome manual forklift.

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To comply with legislation what about making equipment lighter and more durable, i.e. a variant of 3/4 high density polystyrene boxes, with wooden frames with plastic foundation?

 

That would reduce the number of situations where two men lifts or cranes were required.

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We do very little manual lifting now days, not like when I started and were doing 2500 pollination units from the waikato to the bay all by hand.

The main lifting is now full honey boxes off the hive to the pallet, and from the pallet to the rollers in the extracting room. Although there is an electric box lifter to lift the boxes off the pallet to the rollers no one uses it as it is slow and tedious to use

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@Philbee have you considered AS/NZS 4024 Machine Safety as the designer/builder of the crane? Building for yourself you might get away with a simple risk assessment. But offering for sale could incur a significant compliance overhead.

Yes

I come from a highly regulated engineering background and used to deal which Statutory Marine inspectors daily.

The Engineering company I used to contract to would build the cranes and take care of compliance through their systems.

This company is NZs largest privately own Engineering company.

 

We do very little manual lifting now days, not like when I started and were doing 2500 pollination units from the waikato to the bay all by hand.

The main lifting is now full honey boxes off the hive to the pallet, and from the pallet to the rollers in the extracting room. Although there is an electric box lifter to lift the boxes off the pallet to the rollers no one uses it as it is slow and tedious to use

Kind of like life jackets.

Ive stood in a Honey House watching the process you describe and I remember thinking "Man these guys are in dream world"

When you stand in front of the judge I guarantee he will be thinking the same,

A 10k fine should wake them up.

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The main lifting is now full honey boxes off the hive to the pallet, and from the pallet to the rollers in the extracting room. Although there is an electric box lifter to lift the boxes off the pallet to the rollers no one uses it as it is slow and tedious to use

Many of the machines we build are 3+ meters tall. Over the last 12 months we've introduced strict working at heights procedures. Staff complained that simple two minute adjustments would take 10 minutes or more by the time they wait for a forklift with cage. Our response was along the lines that those adjustments will now be known as 10 minute adjustments and why should they care, they're paid by the hour.

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All those 10 minutes add up over the course of a year, some workers do care about the company they work for.:)

Yes, but when it's the company asking them to take the 10 minute option.....

 

What it has done is get the guys thinking ahead more. They now look harder for opportunities to adjust things at ground level before the assemblies are raised to height. The design office similarly are making changes to facilitate this modular approach and, where possible, move the points of adjustment closer to the ground.

 

It's an evolutionary process that will make for a better machine and a safer work environment.

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Actually it's totally the wrong approach. What is really needed are machines that are so dangerous to operate that the idiots we are trying so hard to save from themselves are all wiped out.

Even non-idiots make mistakes. If they're lucky the design will have anticipated their faux pas and no harm will occur.

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Actually it's totally the wrong approach. What is really needed are machines that are so dangerous to operate that the idiots we are trying so hard to save from themselves are all wiped out.
Have to agree with you all we are doing is breeding a country of muppets I left my job last year one of the things was the health and safety people that where putting more people at risk in the name of so-called safety . one of my saying to them was think safety till you kill someone then you can hire more health and safety people. In my crew I had a "don't do dumb #### policy" if it feels dumb it is now people have to be told it's going to kill them. Gave me nightmares every time I got a new engineer on site.
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Actually it's totally the wrong approach. What is really needed are machines that are so dangerous to operate that the idiots we are trying so hard to save from themselves are all wiped out.

It will be to late.by that time we will have exported all our jobs to india and china

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