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Over Worker

blog: Milk - direct from the cows.

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I took my 12 year old daughter with me this morning to check a few hives for swarm cells as they were getting a bit overcrowded . She scraped off the wax on the ceilings then we went for a looksy in each hive . No sign of cells and one hive so strong the queen was laying on all ten frames . We found a frame of hatching bees and spent five minutes watching them hatch ! Some may have had a bit of extra help from my assistant too . Had a real neat time showing her queens , drones and workers , and the difference in brood . Kids really learn fast when they can get hands on . Just need to teach her how to milk the cows for me now , but I dont like my chances .

Ha ha..my kids were always happy to do anything except help milk the cows..

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I think the milk that kids drink now has very little similarity to milk, as its all mucked around, has permeate added, and all taste removed. And its lipid content is affected by PKE.

My daughter pointed out a couple of weeks ago that we can get Lewis Road Creamery milk which is organic, contains no permeate and its cows are not fed PKE (palm kernel expeller).

I did try Fonterra Full Cream milk, and it tasted of very little.

So, I have switched to using the homogenised full cream, and it tastes like milk ! And my porridge is much better, and my real kanuka-rich Harbour Cone honey goes perfectly with it.

And my lipid profile is OK - and I have to eat triple choccie ice-cream every night to stop me getting too thin ...

:)

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Palm Kernel Extract, the by product after the palm oil has been extracted from the palm oil Bunch and was spread back into the plantations as a type of fertilizer. How it was determined a food for Dairy cows I don't know, however those who own the plantations are very wealthy old money generational companies employing NZ companies to manufacture machinery for the industry...so its good and bad.

 

The best milk was always straight out of the vat..not pasteurized or homogenized, was great for the 5 am cups on hangover.

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I think the milk that kids drink now has very little similarity to milk, as its all mucked around, has permeate added, and all taste removed. And its lipid content is affected by PKE.

My daughter pointed out a couple of weeks ago that we can get Lewis Road Creamery milk which is organic, contains no permeate and its cows are not fed PKE (palm kernel expeller).

I did try Fonterra Full Cream milk, and it tasted of very little.

So, I have switched to using the homogenised full cream, and it tastes like milk ! And my porridge is much better, and my real kanuka-rich Harbour Cone honey goes perfectly with it.

And my lipid profile is OK - and I have to eat triple choccie ice-cream every night to stop me getting too thin ...

:)

We have a 'cow farm' just up the road where we can buy unpasteurised fresh milk at much less than Lewis Road prices and without the plastic. It's great and also has cream, ricotta, butter, lassi and other yummy things.

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Good point, access is a problem.

What's the shelf life like ?

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If we get busted for drifting , it was all my fault for mentioning cows , but to answer the question over shelf life . Shop brought milk is essentially sterile after pasteurisation , so lasts a week or more , chilled . Milk sourced from the farm is full of all the good stuff , so provided the cows are healthy and milked in a clean environment , and the milk chilled quickly , then the milk should be good for 3 or 4 days at least . We lived on milk straight from the vat and our kids are the same , with no issues . You just cant compare processed milk to straight from the cow . Once you've tasted it you will never go back !

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As a townie I'm finding the Lewis milk a good step back along the way to milk being delivered in glass bottles and a good cap of cream.

Mmmmmmmmmmm.

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Good point, access is a problem.

What's the shelf life like ?

Shelf life not bad, and sour milk is great for baking or you can make cheese.

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Be thankful we live in NZ.

 

The sale of Raw Milk, even between neighbours, is banned in some parts of the US.

 

They have a section on it in this documentary I think, with the Police doing raids and everything:

 

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We have a raw milk dispenser machine just down the road here in Taupo. (www.tauporawmilk.co.nz/) A dairy farmer has imported a fantastic vending machine from Italy. He milks his cows, the milk goes into a tank. Customers come along to an immaculate room with their containers (or can buy bottles and lids there). You put your money in the machine and choose whether you want 1 or 2 litres dispensed. Put the bottle under a nozzle and raw milk comes out all chilled and lovely. When you have the amount you want, you shut the wee door into the nozzle and its steams it all clean fore the next person. The milk has so much flavour and the cream settles out. $2.50 a litre, and you can buy up to 5 litres at a time. It must be for personal use ie you can't sell it on. It keeps for ages as its so fresh. The cream is great on porage.

 

Its a darned sight easier than having a house cow! We always had house cows when we were kids and the cows would provide milk for the house, the dogs, the pigs and their calves. We would put on 4 calves to start, then 3, then 2 then 1. We used good jersey cows who were spoiled rotten. A couple of years ago my husband decided that he thought I didn't have enough to do so brought home a jersey house cow with the smallest teats ever. I milked her for a couple of weeks. One day I was too busy so he had to milk her. Next day there was another calf on her and it was back to buying milk again!

 

Back to the original thread, my kids (7 and 9) come bee keeping with us. They have all their own gear (except smokers) and go through the hives themselves (with me watching slyly). They love to find queen cells. They like to catch drones and put them in jars with marshmallows. They love it when the spare queen cells hatch and like to play with the queens before they are marked. They have no fear when the bees "bommyknock" their veils. I have also made them an observation hive in the garden by the house so they can watch the bees every day.

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We also have one of these dispensing machines down the road from us (I was reluctant to comment when this was a thread about something else entirely). Agree with you @Lochbrowan this is one of the most amazing concepts I've seen - the milk is fantastic and I still haven't worked out how it dispenses milk where the cream then settles in the bottle. The kids like the whole concept of the cows standing over the fence while they get their milk - and I don't have to milk them.

 

No critical illnesses in our house to date from drinking unpasteurised milk - to be honest I'm more worried about our roof water supply!

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I still haven't worked out how it dispenses milk where the cream then settles in the bottle.
Quite simple really. It's stirred constantly before dispensing. Exactly the same as the billy full I pinch from my vat.

Length of storage time of raw milk is directly related to quality.

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I find this thread so funny. What we did as kids is suddenly now a new concept. As farmers we always had milk from the vat or can, then it was decided that pasteurized, homogenized, and all the other ised was the way to go. Trim milk, low fat milk, calci milk, whole milk, and now suddenly we have a new invention. Good old cows milk as nature provide.

Humans are a funny bunch of beggars. Go figure.

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I'm not sure anyone is calling it a new invention Trevor. The problem for city types like me and my family as we simply haven't been able to access raw milk in the past. Fine for those of you who live rurally, but finally what we are seeing now is commercial options available for the average punter to make their own choice and purchase raw milk conveniently if they so wish.

 

I know it's not for everyone and health risks exist, but I for one appreciate the fact that we now have the choice.

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There is an Italian made milk dispenser in golden bay.

I microwave the bottles for 3 mins on high to sterilise and the milk keeps for a week.

Cause we are an hours drive away I also freeze some in plastic milk containers

That works fine as long as you freeze with the bottles standing up right with a gap at top to expand into.

If you freeze lying down they will generally rupture at the handle.

Something you will not notice untill you see the big puddle as it thaws.

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Those who are now selling direct have had to battle through a maze of rules - the people in Waitakere took a couple of years to push through it. There is a far lower rate of allergies in rural children than town children, and there are ongoing research projects to prove the reason, but the chemical changes in the highly processed milk is near the top of the list of suspects.

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I think Homogenized came about because people didn't like the cream on top of the milk so science came up with the process of combining the two.

 

And pasteurization was to kill diseases carried in the milk from the cows.

 

None of the process were ever any good for the milk or those drinking it.

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I'm not sure anyone is calling it a new invention Trevor.

That is OK. I understand that. I just think it is all quite funny. Maybe it is an age thingy. I am getting sillier as I get older

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When himself was shepherding we had a house cow/s. Fresh milk everyday, I even made butter for a while. The kids were healthy as. Went to see the doctor very little.

 

We moved to Gizzy when they were year 7 and year 5. All of us girls developed hay fever all most immediately. Regular visits to doctor, two lots of tonsils out.

 

Not sure if it was the milk, but it's an interesting idea. I hated pasteurising the milk it made it taste weird, despite the health nurses dismay we drank it straight from the cow.

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I milk two cows and my dairy goats when the cows are dried off before calving. On the odd occasion when I need to though, I can now buy Origin Earth milk either from the supermarket or direct from their factory. It is an awesome alternative to that rubbish that Fonterra churn out. (No pun intended) Fresh milk and scrumptious cheeses. A little rich white mould cheese with a drizzle of fresh honey. That folks is called the good life and nothing beats it!

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@milkandhoney I agree, the Origin Earth products are great.

 

If you want to try the dispenser, it is on Maraekakaho Road, just after the expressway roundabout, on your right as you head towards Bridge Pa :)

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The whole concept of the consumer being able to buy direct from the producer is one I'm quite passionate about . We really are swimming against the tide to be able to buy milk direct from the farm . I know it's a bit conspiracy theorist , but it seems that those with an agenda are pretty keen to push the "dangers " of raw milk , but not so keen to push the benefits . Animal health and cowshed/milking machine hygiene has come so far over the last few years that I believe the heath risks are way less that they have been historically . I think it was Bron that pointed mentioned allergies and its an interesting subject . The farming version of an apple a day keeps the doctor away was - a teaspoon of dirt a day keeps the doctor away ! Not of course actual dirt , but the idea was that if everything you eat and come into contact with is so sterile , your immune system cant build any resistance .

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I'm with @Jas we have become too clean, antibacterial this and that, kids that don't eat worms and play in the dirt. Doctors prescribing antibiotics like lollies. Kids not eating foods until they are such and such an age. There must be a direct relationship between this and the allergies to nuts, wheat, milk etc.

 

The food police have a lot to answer for.

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"whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger"

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Just as a matter of interest , has anyone worked out how many litres of milk each person in NZ would have to drink to keep up with the nation wide milk production ? Just the one farm I am on would require 20,000 people to drink one litre each a day to keep up and it's by no means the biggest farm around here . I heard numbers around 5% of supply being consumed domestic and the rest exported , but I dont know how accurate that is . Guess it's a bit like our honey production . We are heavily reliant on exports to sell the bulk of our product .

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