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Paradise EPS Polystrene Beehive


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I paint the inside, only so the bees do not chew on the polystyrene.

One coat is enough to keep the bees off the poly. They polystyrene is leak proof so you do not need to seal it. Only use acrylic paint.

 

If I remember the video on the manufacturers website correctly they recommend 4 coats of paint for the inside of the feeder.

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If I remember the video on the manufacturers website correctly they recommend 4 coats of paint for the inside of the feeder.

Yes. I saw that also. I didn't bother (as I am inherently lazy). 1 coat was what mine got. No leakage and no dead bees. All worked well. I used a roller brush so probably put on more paint than a spray gun.

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Not a very smart design if you have to paint the box inside.

 

There is a reason why bkpers do not paint their "wooden" boxes inside. It will increase the lifespan of the box however the bees do not like to deal with paint.

 

How many bkpers in NZ only paint their wooden boxes inside?

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As I know it.

The bees chew the wall to clean it and then apply a film of propolis. I am talking about the brand new wooden boxes.

They don't propolis the side of my EPS boxes. In fact I get very little burr wax on the sides of the boxes.

I think this has a lot to do with the fact they are better sealed around the joins.

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@Trevor Gillbanks can Chris Patterson supply any information about recycling the plastics?

Hi @Dave Black. Here is the reply from Chris Patterson

Hey Trevor,

 

Sorry for the delay in replying, I've been flat out pulling nuc's and putting supers on.

 

Polystyrene can be recycled but isn't usually because it is mostly air and the cost of transport is too high.

Because they don't rot, warp, split or crack I find I don't have any to dump. I had about 1/2 a dozen in the first year but that was because I was a novice and didn't strap the boxes down on the trailer properly. I could repair most, but did lose a few that were too badly messed up. Out of the 300 hives I am running I have just repaired 1 nuc and 5 boxes which took all of 5 mins. I expect I will probably have a similar amount to tidy up in April/May. It was just a matter of putting a bit of Gorilla glue in the joint and putting a brick on or a strap around.

If there are concerns about plastic frames /foundation/excluders , I would say don't use them. Use wooden frames, wax foundation and metal excluders, the choice is there.

Chris

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I got one too..shall we start wearing matching shirts as well?

 

Same bee club, same bees, same hives, yes I think we better!

 

How about this for the t shirt slogan;

 

"Beekeeper do it with a veil on"

 

What'ya reckon?

 

Seriously though, we should catch up in the New Year and look through each other's hives (just make sure we sterilise our gear first).

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Same bee club, same bees, same hives, yes I think we better!

 

How about this for the t shirt slogan;

 

"Beekeeper do it with a veil on"

 

What'ya reckon?

 

Seriously though, we should catch up in the New Year and look through each other's hives (just make sure we sterilise our gear first).

Hahaha yeah that would be cool to check hives, you got me curious on how they would compare now.

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you can recycle almost all polymers ... you can add extra UV resistance at the manufacturing source

I used eps spacer blocks for some Q/R.ing, and the little beggars started to chew on it, even painting didn't stop them. R value looks good, but I think some commercials would destroy them in a season

saw a commercial fella in te puke with technoset hives on ute tray. about 1/2 doz

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Several points.

1. Untreated pine will last maybe 5 yrs. I suggest that the Paradise box should last at least 20 years.

2. No tools are required to assemble them (other than sitting on them).

a. Nails or screws are required to assemble a wooden box.

b. Glue is also required for wooden boxes, just the same as with Paradise boxes.

3. Paradise boxes come out flat and square without any work or checking. (unlike wooden boxes)

4. It is very quick to assemble the paradise boxes. (I could do several hundred in a day). Far more than wooden ones.

5. If you paint your wooden boxes on the inside, they will also last longer.

6. Paradise boxes do not need to be painted, but I like to. They will not rot if they are not painted.

7. They are a lot lighter than a wooden box.

8. Yes, rats can chew into a Paradise box, but they also chew into a wooden one also.

9. The extra screw in the mesh is a lot quicker than making a wooden/mesh floor. The mesh on a wooden floor needs securing also.

 

That will do for starters.

 

Hi Trev . Thanks for your videos and sharing all your knowledge, my first year beekeeping I have learnt so much from you. Would you recomend the paradise hive as a good option for a semi commercial looking to take advantage of early summer honey flow? Do you or can you use the queen trap as a top entrance? I'm looking at purchasing up to 300 hives over the next 5 years for our farm but don't want to make a mistake buying the wrong type of hive. Victor from Australian Honey Bees has gone that way and seems to really rate them and you have said that your main paradise hive was ahead of your others. Anything I should be wary of?. Thanks Again Trev,

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Hi Trev . Thanks for your videos and sharing all your knowledge, my first year beekeeping I have learnt so much from you. Would you recomend the paradise hive as a good option for a semi commercial looking to take advantage of early summer honey flow? Do you or can you use the queen trap as a top entrance? I'm looking at purchasing up to 300 hives over the next 5 years for our farm but don't want to make a mistake buying the wrong type of hive. Victor from Australian Honey Bees has gone that way and seems to really rate them and you have said that your main paradise hive was ahead of your others. Anything I should be wary of?. Thanks Again Trev,

Yes, I think it is a good option. I know of 2 commercials in the Manawatu who are converting to paradise hives.

They are great if you have limited timber working skills.

I rate these hives very highly.

Whilst I am sure there are some who will disagree with me, I think that even thou the initial cost is higher than timber, when you add in your assembly time for timber and durability of Polystyrene then Paradise Hives will work out very cost competitive.

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Yes they do look good (eps hives)

The only problem I have (this goes for all non bio degradeable things, packaging etc) is their End Of Life disposal.

The same for plastic frames. I know that certain plastics can be recycled, perhaps the same can be done for these hives.

At least a wooden box the option to be landfilled/ natural degradadation or used for starting the next camp fire to cook over.

 

Having said all that if it wasnt so cost effective for me to make my own boxes, I would consider going EPS as well, there may well be a viable recycling option 50 years from now.

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