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Nick Spoon

Should I wait for queen cups before splitting

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Thanks for all the good advice here everyone. I decided to just split and see what happened. And then I just couldn't wait to see how things were progressing (despite all advice to just leave them, it's so hard!).

 

What I found is lots of capped queen cells, made from the queen cells/cups I had been waiting for the queen to lay in! I know that there was no egg in these cells when I split, so the bees have taken eggs and transferred them! Either that or workers have laid in them, but these cells are now capped and I don't think they'd let an unfertilised larva get to that stage?

 

Well, fingers crossed now, but seeing a big crop of capped queen cells has made me feel much better.

@Nick Spoon

Without being too personal I must point out that you do not understand how bees create queens.

Please refrain from posting on this topic until you have done reading in the recommended texts, as you will seriously mislead new bee keepers - an example is every concept in the paragraph starting with "What I found is ..."

And have you actually done a course ?

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I would leave only one

If you have the experience(what and how + your management style/method) you will be fine with 2 or even 3 QCs.

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@Nick Spoon

Without being too personal I must point out that you do not understand how bees create queens.

Please refrain from posting on this topic until you have done reading in the recommended texts, as you will seriously mislead new bee keepers - an example is every concept in the paragraph starting with "What I found is ..."

And have you actually done a course ?

As one who knows nothing about bees, as I read it, @Nick Spoon has simply reported what he did and what he found. He has not said to anyone that they should do this.

If what he's done wasn't wise or following the normal (perhaps seen as "correct") way to do things, I'm sure he's willing to learn and be corrected. I think that's what a lot of people are here for. (y)

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@Nick Spoon

Without being too personal I must point out that you do not understand how bees create queens.

Please refrain from posting on this topic until you have done reading in the recommended texts, as you will seriously mislead new bee keepers - an example is every concept in the paragraph starting with "What I found is ..."

And have you actually done a course ?

 

Sorry but I find this rude and completely the wrong approach, especially given your comments in another thread about heavy handed moderation and allowing conversation to flow. What you are saying between the lines is possibly correct - he may mislead new beekeepers, if the posts are taken in isolation, but "what I've found" is expressing a learning method, its not saying "I've done this so you should do it too".

 

Its also stirring thought processes amongst others who are now contributing, so when you read through the whole topic you have a majority suggesting you do it xxx way. If @Nick Spoon chooses to do it yyy way and shares his findings then we'll (and he'll) know for next time.

 

Edit: And there you go a non beekeeper posted over me as I was typing with the same independent thought process.

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main things to watch is if weather is good enough for mating and that the hive is strong enough to split. its much better to wait and get the hive really strong before splitting.

What would you consider a "really strong hive" suitable for splitting?

I thought I've seen comments of people taking nucs into an FD box, waiting till most of the new 5 frames to be drawn and performing a small nuc split.

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You can still make small/weak splits now, however in February you better make strong splits and add a mated queen.

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I was more asking in relation to the state of a hive. For example X number of frames in the brood chamber.

 

Stronger split in feb as they would slowly be making winter preparations?

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...........Stronger split in feb as they would slowly be making winter preparations?

 

Yes, and less food out there. The amount of food in the nature and the season(weather) guides them. However with some home made food they will still rock till April(it is not recommended to feed after that because of the low temps and high moisture level).

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if you can graft queen cells then i would certainly do so. certainly prefer queen cells over emergency cells anyday.

quite easy to use cloake setup on a hive to raise a few queen cells.

THIS easy stuff (not) I want to understand......

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