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I was recently stung on the wrist, this would have to be my 15th - 20th sting since starting beekeeping 3years ago. Every time I've had a little local swelling, but this time my lower arm swelled up, was very hot and itchy. Has lasted 2 days and is staring to go down now. Always take anti histamine for hay fever but doesn't seem to make much difference. Is this something I should be worried about? All I'm thinking is what if this was my throat?

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I used to swell up like that every time I got stung and would take a week to go down. Now a days I hardly notice anything mind u I tend to get 5-6 stings every time im out. My sister n law got stung last weekend on the arm and within 20min was covered in a rash, blood shot eyes , pressure in her ears and a horse throat. Now that was a bad reaction! after a trip to the hospital and a few pills she was good as gold. Doctor said the next sting could kill her. Be sure to have an Epi pen with you in the car/ute even if you have had no history of bad reactions as they can happen at anytime it may just save your life.

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I was recently stung on the wrist, this would have to be my 15th - 20th sting since starting beekeeping 3years ago. Every time I've had a little local swelling, but this time my lower arm swelled up, was very hot and itchy. Has lasted 2 days and is staring to go down now. Always take anti histamine for hay fever but doesn't seem to make much difference. Is this something I should be worried about? All I'm thinking is what if this was my throat?

This is what happens almost every time I get stung, a bloody nuisance but I figure it will get better over time.

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If your reacting less with each sting, its nothing to worry about. BUT if your reacting 'more' with each sting, its time to stop being casual & be very careful & wear full protection. Allergic responses can increase in time with some people to become serious stuff. Talk to your GP about what to keep on hand medicine wise & keep a stock on hand 'before' you urgently need it!

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If your reacting less with each sting, its nothing to worry about.

 

Disagree. Allergic reactions can strike any of us, any time, with no warning. Previous tolerance or trend of reaction level is no guarantee of the severity of the next sting. Any time you feel anything out of the ordinary, act on it.

 

Nick, if what you experienced was only in that lower arm limb, it's what would probably be classed as a 'large local' reaction... annoying, but not an "allergic" reaction, in that your body/immune system is not reacting systemically to the sting, only locally. The good news is it doesn't indicate you're on a path to an allergy.. there's no direct relationship there.

 

I get them occasionally, especially with head stings, and they are bloody annoying. Antihistamine for the itch, a painkiller if needed, and anti-inflammatory can help to take it down, but mostly just waiting it out.

 

Allergic Reactions to Insect Stings

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Disagree. Allergic reactions can strike any of us, any time, with no warning. Previous tolerance or trend of reaction level is no guarantee of the severity of the next sting. Any time you feel anything out of the ordinary, act on it.

 

Nick, if what you experienced was only in that lower arm limb, it's what would probably be classed as a 'large local' reaction... annoying, but not an "allergic" reaction, in that your body/immune system is not reacting systemically to the sting, only locally. The good news is it doesn't indicate you're on a path to an allergy.. there's no direct relationship there.

 

I get them occasionally, especially with head stings, and they are bloody annoying. Antihistamine for the itch, a painkiller if needed, and anti-inflammatory can help to take it down, but mostly just waiting it out.

 

Allergic Reactions to Insect Stings

Thank for the responses.

So far stings have only been on legs and arms/hands.

I had one sting the previous day on upper left arm above elbow, small amount of swelling and itchy but was gone within a day. The one on my right arm was on the bottom of my wrist (hole in gloves!!) which swelled all of lower arm. So I believe it's just localised large swelling. The stings don't hurt at the time much. It did take me a while to get the stinger out this time so proberbly didn't help!! All I worry about is how this could affect throat if stung on neck!

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It did take me a while to get the stinger out this time so proberbly didn't help!! All I worry about is how this could affect throat if stung on neck!

That is the important piece of information there. Get the stinger out quick.

I am sure my sensitivity to the stings was because I didnt take a stinger out while closing up a grumpy queenless topbar hive 5 years ago. Since then I have had dozens and dozens of stings without a reaction and a couple with the same reaction as @Jared@bex Sister In Law has just had. They key to all of them is managing the risk and suiting up appropriately. I just deal with the heat and sweat because I know I am not getting stung and I can keep on keeping bees.

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...this would have to be my 15th - 20th sting since starting beekeeping 3years ago....So far stings have only been on legs and arms/hands.I had one sting the previous day on upper left arm above elbow, small amount of swelling and itchy but was gone within a day. The one on my right arm ... swelled all of lower arm. So I believe it's just localised large swelling... All I worry about is how this could affect throat if stung on neck!

 

What @deejaycee said, and stings always vary, by where they are, by the dose of venom (altered by their age and ability) etc, etc,. Yours sound entirely normal to me. What I really want to add is that, if the rate of stings is less than ten or more each year people generally continue to react as if each one was a new experience. To build up real tolerance you will need to be stung a lot more often, like ten a week. Not that I recommend it.

It is harder than you might think to close your airway, the hard cartilaginous tube doesn't change, it's fleshy bits like your tongue that can swell up and cause trouble.

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I think it was @Merk who did this a couple of years ago. Maybe @Daley would remember.

 

Yep it was. Was all good. Now carries epipen and gps locator. We're in tiger country. Too far away if anything goes really pear shaped. Especially if you have major in the middle of nowhere, miles away from tarseal let alone medical assistance.

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I think it was @Merk who did this a couple of years ago. Maybe @Daley would remember.

Yes he did. We also sting ourselves at primary schools at the start of the season when we're doing bee talks, to make sure we haven't developed allergies over the winter and to build up our immunity again, the kids love it and it's quite educational because then we show them how the venom sac pumps venom through the sting and then how to remove a sting correctly without squeezing it.. The teachers and other adult spectators are usually quite shocked haha.

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Yep it was. Was all good. Now carries epipen and gps locator. We're in tiger country. Too far away if anything goes really pear shaped. Especially if you have major in the middle of nowhere, miles away from tarseal let alone medical assistance.

I'll be getting an EPERB next year and an epi-pen. And updating my first aid cert.

I've just spent days trying to write a stupid H&S plan, I find it rather amusing considering I don't have staff. H&S is common sense, it heavily implies that everyone is stupid, perhaps we should take off the warning labels, when you have to point out every blatantly obvious hazard you would think maybe it was for the best.

But anyway, I wrote a huge section about bee stings and I think that I need to start carrying more stuff such as an epi-pen and an EPERB because if I ever end up with someone having a bad reaction, I would like to do the best I could to save them.

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In case I get stung really bad and there's no hope of living, I like to also keep a claw hammer in my vehicle, should I have to take my own life..

Well depending where I am and the circumstances I don't always wear a seatbelt.. I trust my driving just not other people's. If I've got a truck and trailer of beehives I'll take my chances being thrown from the wreckage.. Rather than being stuck in there upside down and slowly stung to death.. And I have a knife in the door in case I have to cut my seatbelt.

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I carry a PLB at all times, for me was easy to justify as it doubles as a safety net for hunting and fishing trips.

 

Now available for about $600. Small price to pay if you roll the ute down a hill, have an allergic reaction, break an ankle, have a heart attack....all the stuff people think will never happen to them - until it does.

 

Nice thought that you can activate the PLB and have a chopper on hand inside an hour. Won't save a life in absolutely every scenario, but more likely to than trying to crawl kilometres to cell phone coverage!

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