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Obtaining swarms from commercial areas


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Wow expensive. Patience and you'll get a swarm. Took me two years to get a swarm but I did. Tell you what Wildflower, If I get 2 more swarms this season you can have the second.

I don' t reckon its expensive, I'd say that it's a fair price for a nuc at this time of year, it's got brood, an established new queen, built up frames, and likely in good condition ready to make honey. A swarm will probably have an older queen, and no brood, and probably won't make as much honey this season as it will need time to get up and running nicely. Just my 2 cents worth though...

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you have already ordered bees from the North Canterbury bee club ? why are you looking else were ? they will come just give them a little time :)

Sorry, but I can't quite see where you have derived that information from.

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Wow expensive. Patience and you'll get a swarm. Took me two years to get a swarm but I did. Tell you what Wildflower, If I get 2 more swarms this season you can have the second.

Lovely offer thank you

 

 

Why can't Wildflower get bees from Elsewhere as well?

To be honest I would happily fill two hives. :)

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you have already ordered bees from the North Canterbury bee club ? why are you looking else were ? they will come just give them a little time :)

Awesome Thomas. I must be getting a little impatient sorry. And haven't heard anything. I do hope for some bees this year. I guess I am just trying to be proactive. Sometimes it feels like a dream that I wil . have my very own bees

Had heaps of bee visitors today. They love my wildflowers.

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@Jimbo swarms will make comb around the Old "laying" queen as she lays. In a good flow, they will draw and fill a full depth super in a week. I've pulled 5 full depth supers off a good sized swarm caught in late October early November and strategically placed in a citrus orchard. Swarms are amazing!

 

However, we are careful to keep them in a swarm yard, for up to a year, and watch them closely, only ever housed on waxed foundation and in your oldest gear. (When we were told this a few years ago, all we had was new gear!)

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@Jimbo, I have to agree with @Bron. A swarm always is in full swing to survive. They know what they need and they prepare themselves for it. I.E. they take as much honey as they can in their mouth with themselves and the bees that are ready to leave are the bees with the bees wax gland pumped. Those bees ready for this action will join the swarm. They will work harder then a split/nuc because the instinct pushes them. So no surprises if a swarm is more expensive than a split/nuc.
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Hi @Wildflower, here is a little story for you to keep positive: we sold one of our Top Bar hives (brand new, no bees in it) to a lovely lady. She wanted her bees and she wanted them as soon as possible, early September. No she didn't need us to come and install the hive for her (we do this for free to all our customers within 25 km area). She didn't know anything about bees, but She wants to learn, and she loves them!! She would make things work... Then she bargained on the cash price of the hive and some gear, we gave her a little discount.... And the promise that when bees became available we would let her know and sell her a nuc. We have a hire a hive service for new aspiring bekeepers, and we shadow manage hives with them, the learning experience is fantastic. But she wanted those bees to be all hers, from day 1. And she couldn't wait very much, as 3 days after taking her hive home, she calls me and tells me if there is anything i can do to get her bees before anything and anyone else.... I explained that I could't get her what wasn't fully functioning yet, is good to wait until the bees are stronger and fully come out of winter, make sure that everyone is laying nicely and bringing in lots of pollen, etc etc...

We were taking her some bees this coming week as we have managed to catch a couple of swarms, and have two nucs doing really well. But she called all excited that a swarm had moved into her hive!!! It was all set up, ready, in a nice sunny but sheltered spot, lots of forage around, a nice pond at the back of her garden, chickens, ducks, beatiful fruit trees and vege garden. And the perfect time arrived and her bees chose her.

I'm not saying "sit and wait", but i'm saying "bee patient". You want your bees to be strong, and healthy, and if it takes a little longer, maybe the wait is worth it.

In the meantime, read, learn, go to beekeeping gatherings, talk to beekeepers, have your hive ready and set up, and your gear all ready (suit and veil at least, gloves are good too), a little like having your "hospital bag" ready around the time your baby is due. It could happen anytime!! And it is a wonderful experience.

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Hey all if there's swarms in a tree in someone Commercial bee yard and they haven't been to there bees in weeks can I go in therE yard and get them as the all looks cold and it's been raining or is there a 3ft rule or something

the only rule is do you have permission to be on that land.

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