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DocumentComvita's Breeding Operations


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Hmm personally I don't think marketing and mythmaking is necessarily a new or bad aspect of the beekeeping industry... I mean, the prices fetched for manuka have been partly driven by the asian health food supplement market even though the efficacy of consumed manuka has already been disproven. The stories attached to products and brands is something creative that modern business people are embracing. I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing (as long as there is no dishonesty involved) as it can add value to our New Zealand products, especially in the international market. Any associations with New Zealand as an innovative and modern producer of honey, through the branding of companies like Comvita, will probably add value to NZ honey, just like our association with 'clean green' New Zealand does. I just hope like hell that beekeepers and businesspeople in general in New Zealand practice what they preach when it comes to benefiting from these 'clean green' or 'innovative' aspects of brand New Zealand... On that note, please use reusable queen cages and queen cups... I hate seeing plastic being burnt or unnecesarily thrown out!!!!

I would love to know if they are trying tobreed varroa tolerant bees.If so how are they doing it.

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Hmm personally I don't think marketing and mythmaking is necessarily a new or bad aspect of the beekeeping industry... I mean, the prices fetched for manuka have been partly driven by the asian health food supplement market even though the efficacy of consumed manuka has already been disproven. The stories attached to products and brands is something creative that modern business people are embracing. I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing (as long as there is no dishonesty involved) as it can add value to our New Zealand products, especially in the international market. Any associations with New Zealand as an innovative and modern producer of honey, through the branding of companies like Comvita, will probably add value to NZ honey, just like our association with 'clean green' New Zealand does. I just hope like hell that beekeepers and businesspeople in general in New Zealand practice what they preach when it comes to benefiting from these 'clean green' or 'innovative' aspects of brand New Zealand... On that note, please use reusable queen cages and queen cups... I hate seeing plastic being burnt or unnecesarily thrown out!!!!

 

good story, and yes myth making is a big factor in sales marketing. the real trouble begins when we confuse fact with myth, for example, Rolls Royce's enviable reputation V's tarot card readers.

Also with today's instant media outlets, happenings, or bad news goes viral. ... instant uncontrollable damage. Look no further than the recent bobby calf incident.

My opinion is that the manuka honey industry is rotten from top to bottom. as ' berengaria ' has pointed out and from above

even though the efficacy of consumed manuka has already been disproven.

 

So it comes down to a company with a marketing ploy based on bulls... In the short term ' they ' make the coin big time, but the risk is those of us who don't wish to scramble for manuka, will be tarred with the same brush, when the stool gets kicked out beheath.

 

boom or bust , I really hope the Govt see it this way ! ... nothing lasts forever, esp the way this manuka marketing is being manipulated, when it all goes bad ( which it will ) i'll quote Winston Churchill " never before have so few, screwed it for so many "

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Very cynical view Robbie.

Sheep cant really drive Hiluxes and that other brand cant tow large pipes that fall off trucks.

Whats going to happen when the consumer realises that.

Chinese buy manuka honey because they want to, can afford it and possibly even like the taste.

If you have the money you can also buy caviar and truffles.

You can own a Rolex or a Maclaren.

The Chinese also have the opportunity to supply us with their low value goods of questionable quality.

Personally I believe they are on a win when all is laid bare.

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It's public domain that Kiwi Bee is a stakeholder in Betta Bees, and yes Betta Bees is developing VSH traits. As the annual reports states Kiwi Bee use "AMS" and AMS can keep track of the queen stock, notes on the queen, her age etc. We are already using AMS to record this info and there are hives maked in the DB as having VSH traits - we will use this data to further select our breeders internally, and I guess this will be passed back to Frans at Betta Bees as well.

 

Corporates aren't all evil, and not everything is marketing spin ;)

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I quite agree @berengaria and @Philbee. Consumer marketing, telling BS or just stretching the truth has been going on in one form or another for at least 2000 years. Consuming Manuka honey is not the first and won't be the last product from "Nature" to have "special health benefits" What about deer antler, it's consumed in vast quantities.

I'm far more concerned about hive thefts, bad, or NO management practices. And if these sort of things are being done by the large companies and/or their staff then they need to remedy it fast.

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if comvita's varroa resistance breeding program is successful will the general public benefit or will comvita keep these genetics for their own commercial use

It is currently available for the public, as below

 

It's public domain that Kiwi Bee is a stakeholder in Betta Bees, and yes Betta Bees is developing VSH traits.
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It is currently available for the public, as below

I googled betta bees and read about their breeding program.

At $1500 a queen would it be queen breeders who would buy them.

Surely you would not have a yearly turn over at that price.

I wonder.how many years you could breed from a queen if you looked after her

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$1500 sounds like a lot to pay , but if the queen had vastly superior genetics and you reared say 1500 queens from her , then thats only $1 per queen . Thats only half the equation though . You still need quality drones to mate with those queens to get good gains I would imagine .

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Very cynical view Robbie.

Sheep cant really drive Hiluxes and that other brand cant tow large pipes that fall off trucks.

Whats going to happen when the consumer realises that.

Chinese buy manuka honey because they want to, can afford it and possibly even like the taste.

If you have the money you can also buy caviar and truffles.

You can own a Rolex or a Maclaren.

The Chinese also have the opportunity to supply us with their low value goods of questionable quality.

Personally I believe they are on a win when all is laid bare.

 

Frankly I don't see any cynicism in my post at all. we're dealing with an old population in China, with incredibly ingrained historical attitudes.

Like western social, modernistic thought processes,and science, our part of the world has moved on from ' old wives tales '

It's not hard to see how quickly rampant social change is moving within China. The Chinese youth will discard old China as they grasp for western socialism and cultural attitudes.

Selling manuka honey to these asian countries is not a ' given ' your best bet is offering a couple of jars with every new McLaren sold

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Doesn't matter how flash those Q's are, or how many of them are around, they're still a minute drop in the country wide genetic bucket. It will be a very protracted & expensive business getting any degree of VHS established in the wider population. And until that happens the VHS -ers are stuck with closed breeding programs of some sort.

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Doesn't matter how flash those Q's are, or how many of them are around, they're still a minute drop in the country wide genetic bucket. It will be a very protracted & expensive business getting any degree of VHS established in the wider population. And until that happens the VHS -ers are stuck with closed breeding programs of some sort.

I wonder how long it would take for them to be so inbreed that they can no longer function as bees-I wonder how many other drawbacks the beekeeping industry would tolerate to achieve varroa resistance?

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I wonder how long it would take for them to be so inbreed that they can no longer function as bees-I wonder how many other drawbacks the beekeeping industry would tolerate to achieve varroa resistance?

Too true Kiwifruiter

Its an immensely complex issue.

For example, genetic probabilities aside, if an isolated wild population evolved over 200 years to tolerate Varroa, it may well be that the bee's tolerance is intrinsically connected to that specific environment and the bee's genetics.

So by separating one from the other changes the nature of both.

This is without even considering the nature of the mite and its ability to adapt.

All I can say is good luck to the hardy soles who are working on the problem

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Theres all sorts of " free" money to be had by putting your hand up for any kind of research program.

Im sure it could be quite handy in years of no honey flow.

 

If the US hasnt solved the problem of varroa tolerance with all the money and resources they have thrown at it then I very much doubt we will.

.

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we're dealing with an old population in China, with incredibly ingrained historical attitudes.

... and an innate appreciation of slow, drawn out revenge busily scheming away to see if Manuka provides a way to return the favour for taking "their" gooseberries and making a pile of money selling them as kiwi fruit :-):):P

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... and an innate appreciation of slow, drawn out revenge busily scheming away to see if Manuka provides a way to return the favour for taking "their" gooseberries and making a pile of money selling them as kiwi fruit :):):P

 

Ever seen wild gooseberries? Good luck selling that!

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