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Comments on FLOW Hives

Do you think FLOW hives are a good (useful, helpful NOT detrimental) idea?  

98 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you think FLOW hives are a good (useful, helpful NOT detrimental) idea?

    • Yes
      20
    • No
      42
    • Not Sure
      36


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and that's the most dangerous downside of the damn things.

they are even more dangerous for tut poisoning than cut comb.

they should not even be allowed in nz.

mark my words, if these things take off the next "tut year" someone will put his family into hospital with one of these(or worse)

No tutin problems here. I'd be happy to try a flow hive.

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Probably would be awesome for you @Janice you know what you're doing and it would save you lifting everything if it works

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@yesbut singing........

 

Nice. I think we may be getting SLIGHTLY off topic, but nice :D

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If you have plastic foundation/frames, you can't chrush and strain,

 

Sure you can, in fact it's easier to scrape plastic foundation.

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Sure you can, in fact it's easier to scrape plastic foundation.

 

Crush and strain, or scrape and strain? Personally, I like my honey without the microbeads, but each their own.

Not much else to do until somebody puts their hand up and say "Yes, I have a Flow Hive, and I like that...."

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I can understand the cons, but a person we met the other day told us they got a Flow hive. They invested in this project because they thought it was very cool, a way to see the bees closer to people who know nothing about bees. Not everyone who has a dog is a vet or a dog trainer, and that doesn't mean that every dog owner who is not one or the other is a bad dog owner and the world of dogs is doomed. I feel the same applies to bees: we love them but we don't know them. We love the honey, even tho it is not about the honey (oh but it is!!!), and we want a little bit of that in our homes. Not the whole beekeeping shebang of frames and boxes and uncapping knives and smokers and extractors etc, just a little bit, enough to teach our children where honey comes from (NOT the supermarket!!). And to support an innovative idea, in the same way that we were/would have liked to be supported when we had a spark of genious....

My only concern is who is making sure all this Flow Hives are registered and inspected regularly, looked after.

And wouldn't it be nice if we stop the negativity so one of these people with Flow Hives feels at ease on this forum to share the experience?

That is a measured and thoughtful response. I have seen the videos and am impressed with the technology which appears to be the first really new thing in hive design since Langstroth over 150 years ago. Excluding plastic foundation of course! Time will tell whether these hives have a big impact or not, but we should keep an open mind on them for sure.

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Keep us posted

I got in early on the crowdfunding thingy - so four of the Flow frames have arrived! I just got some frames rather than the whole hive set-up. They seem well-made, were properly packaged with an instruction manual that is clear enough.

 

Over last weekend modified a 10-frame box to fit the Flow frames, as per the instructions, which was something of a fiddle. So there's four Flow frames in the centre positions of the box with two normal frames on either side. There's a couple of gaps that bees could potentially come out of when you open the cutaway panel to see the Flow frames, this is possibly because I'm not very good with jigsaw cuts....time will tell. Will be putting the box with the Flow frames on a hive hopefully this weekend - will take some photos to post.

 

If anyone wanted to have a look-see (near Darfield), welcome to drop me a PM

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I got in early on the crowdfunding thingy - so four of the Flow frames have arrived! I just got some frames rather than the whole hive set-up. They seem well-made, were properly packaged with an instruction manual that is clear enough.

 

Over last weekend modified a 10-frame box to fit the Flow frames, as per the instructions, which was something of a fiddle. So there's four Flow frames in the centre positions of the box with two normal frames on either side. There's a couple of gaps that bees could potentially come out of when you open the cutaway panel to see the Flow frames, this is possibly because I'm not very good with jigsaw cuts....time will tell. Will be putting the box with the Flow frames on a hive hopefully this weekend - will take some photos to post.

 

If anyone wanted to have a look-see (near Darfield), welcome to drop me a PM

 

Look forward to your photos @SaffronDuck !! Thanks for sharing your experience!!

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Presented by Chris Russell, 'New Inventors' ABC TV

 

 

Ten years ago Byron Bay inventor, Cedar Anderson, looked at a beehive and thought there must be an easier way to extract honey straight from the hive that was less stressful on the bees.

 

Living on the smell of an oily rag and working in his shed, Cedar with the help of his father, Stuart, came up with the concept of the Flow Hive. It’s a plastic frame that sits inside a conventional beehive. With a pull of the lever honey simply drains into a jar.

 

But it was what happened next that took the world by storm. Cedar decided to put the invention up on a crowdfunding site hoping to raise $70,000. The video of the Flow Hive went viral and by the end of the campaign, they had US$12.2 million worth of advance orders and a monumental task ahead of them.

 

After a life tinkering quietly in a shed, Cedar and Stuart now face the challenge of running a multimillion dollar company. How will they cope?

 

Australian Story :: Going With The Flow

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.................... I have seen the videos and am impressed with the technology which appears to be the first really new thing in hive design since Langstroth over 150 years ago.............

 

Did you know as these frames were invented long time ago by a Spanish inventor? Those days made from metal sheet(not plastic).

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A flow hive would work for a beek with numerous conventional hives that can provide the resources to support the flow hive.

The idea of having just one colony of bees and a flow hive is fundamentally flawed.

For this reason I see this idea being a fad.

Its possible that some energetic person could set up a business that manages the flow hive for owners but this is probably one step removed from the target markets dream.

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I never noticed they had gone!

Why have they gone?

.

 

probably went to North Island..

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Looks like the Flow Hive is not a new idea. Something similar was patented in Spain in 1939:

 

Beehive

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Looks like the Flow Hive is not a new idea. Something similar was patented in Spain in 1939:

 

Beehive

Perhaps not the first time this tactic has been deployed. I wonder if Spain has heard about Chappell's underarm bowl?

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Ha ha, I doubt Spain has heard of that dark day, I also doubt J.B. Garriga raised millions of dollars to develop his design!

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Ha ha, I doubt Spain has heard of that dark day, I also doubt J.B. Garriga raised millions of dollars to develop his design!

 

And quite possible in Garriga's design the bees will not block the mechanism with propolis.

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They seem really expensive to me, and encourage people not to check inside so often.

Manuka/kanuka honey would prob be too thick to run out aye? I reckon it would be a nightmare to clean! I am sounding pretty negative.....What do you think? cheers

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I think you're sounding pretty negative ! :lol

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here are some photos - of the modified box to fit four Flow frames (two standard frames sit either side of these)

they have been on the hive for two weeks now - I put another 'baited' box with some honey frames above it, to encourage bees to move up and at least encounter the Flow frames. They seem to be treating them much as they would brand new clean plastic frames - a little bit of activity, not active avoidance but preferring standard frames that are already drawn out. too early to tell if there's actually any nectar being put in the cells of the flow frames. only a couple of bees came out of the little doorway when I took it off for a look, and they were just confused not cross...they haven't had time to seal things up around the door insert

5992eb1bab9c3_modifiedbox.JPG.d3079a2f63ce7999de4049afd556a290.JPG

5992eb1baf338_flowframes.JPG.18dc318a4e7dcef43aa5a00143cc498f.JPG

5992eb1bb276c_boxonhive.JPG.55287a4a75e73ac20ed815af324a4e6f.JPG

5992eb1bb6952_boxonhive2.JPG.c5c12e6a41d64000f96c2bdc2aad82c6.JPG

5992eb1bab9c3_modifiedbox.JPG.d3079a2f63ce7999de4049afd556a290.JPG

5992eb1baf338_flowframes.JPG.18dc318a4e7dcef43aa5a00143cc498f.JPG

5992eb1bb276c_boxonhive.JPG.55287a4a75e73ac20ed815af324a4e6f.JPG

5992eb1bb6952_boxonhive2.JPG.c5c12e6a41d64000f96c2bdc2aad82c6.JPG

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Wow, thats going to be really interesting. I see they are selling knockoffs on Alibaba now. Works out around $75 a frame but you have to buy a set of 7.

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May I ask, what are those crossed bands on top of the flow frames? Are they rubber bands? What is their purpose?

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I see they are selling knockoffs on Alibaba now. Works out around $75 a frame but you have to buy a set of 7.

I does not take long for copies to appear.

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May I ask, what are those crossed bands on top of the flow frames? Are they rubber bands? What is their purpose?

They're thin wire, and they run around top & bottom outer surfaces of the frames, there is the same criss-cross pattern on the bottom too. Think they are bracing of sorts (even though they are not very high tension) - I can see if you started trying to take these frames apart you would end up with a lot of components, so it's perhaps to avoid that happening if they get a hard impact

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I love these flow hives. Everyone forgets about top bar hives for a bit and starts poking something else for giggles.

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I love these flow hives. Everyone forgets about top bar hives for a bit and starts poking something else for giggles.

Until someone comes up with a top bar flow hive haha .

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