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See pics attached. Only a few hundred bees probably. There was patchy cells mostly capped with dead larva or developed dead bees inside. Some dead ones were half hatched out of the cell with tongue hanging out. Some dead larva pretty rotten, black but not AFB, not ropy, very liquidy. There is a Q in the hive but no brood at all, appears to be plenty of food. I suspect varroa (bayvarol treatment in March/april) but no sign now (presume cos there's no brood?). I stripped the hive down from 2 FD brood box and one 3/4 honey box down to one FD box only, stocked up that box with honey frames so they still have enough honey. Anyone know what the problem might be by the look of the dead bees5992eaf9ad81d_beeframe.jpg.b50d7e73ed7be32dd6fe167e33c64dd8.jpg ?

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5992eaf9ad81d_beeframe.jpg.b50d7e73ed7be32dd6fe167e33c64dd8.jpg

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hopefully the bees have taken the bulk of the mites away and died out in the field.

depends how bad the virus's are if they hive will survive or not.

keep them small, feed them a bit, treat for mites (obviously not with apistan/bayvarol).

fingers crossed.

the catch is being weak they are open to attack from everything else.

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with a few hundred bees and no brood hatching for a few weeks now i'd say the hive is dead. if varroa was the cause anyway.

if it wasn't varroa maybe it could survive on a split board using a strong hive as underfloor heating, but you lose the field bees by moving the hive and it would make it even more likely to get robbed.

 

you are better of to put them out of their misery and make a new split when the season picks up. sorry for being so realistic.

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Hi team. It was a colder and wet night last night here and this morning I found these two just inside the hive entrance and dragged them out for a look. Being that there is only 2 I don't know if this is just one of those things or not. 2 Apistan strips applied on the 1st of Nov. Was a 3/4 frame Nuc that I started to build out into a 3/4 box on the 21st of Oct and recently added a full box on top about a week ago. Building out the frames in the top box very well and appears to be a very active hive. The brood was hard not gooey or elasticimage.jpeg.ae99390632e731fdee10ad1a2f76b912.jpeg

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DWV ='s Deformed Wing Virus. It is a virus that weakens and kills bees and is spread by varroa mites. It is so named because some of the bees if infected as larvae will have stunted wings. A lot of DWV in a hive is taken as evidence that there are also a lot of varroa mites in the hive.

 

Agree with Yesbut. May indicate a problem but a couple of larvae will sometimes be found in front of any hive, could be a few varroa, could be the beekeeper put a frame in different and some larvae had to be removed, perhaps from burr comb on a top bar.

 

Timo with dead brood and just a few hundred bees your hive is beyond recovery even if the mites were killed, without other help as well it will die. UNLESS you were to put a comb of healthy brood just starting to hatch, from another hive, into it. There would have to be enough bees in the sick hive to keep this brood warm till it hatched, and you would have to put Apivar into the hive at the same time.

 

If you go this way do not put just any brood in the hive, choose a comb that has bees just about to hatch. If you used a comb where the bees are a week or two away from hatching, the bees in the sick hive may not be in good enough shape to look after them that long.

 

This is assuming the queen is not too damaged to be able to start laying eggs again.

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Died in their cells at a late stage some time in the last couple of weeks. House bees just getting around to cleaning up.

 

Clearly deformed wings so DWV a likely candidate with varroa the most likely vector.

 

However they're few I number and you're already treating the most likely cause with the Apistan. You will continue to see small numbers of the same for some weeks but as @yesbut says, nothing to worry about.

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I took Bayvarol strips out end of June it did okay in most hives I've found three with DWV this week one quite bad so will treat all with Apivar.

It's not going take the mites long to get the better of some hives when the treatments effectiveness is patchy

Apivar has been a life saver for three hives with a high loading of varroa, I had a ten frame hive with big problems at the end of June so I resorted it in to a 4 frame nuc it was down to a fist size of brood on two sides of one frame. Varroa clearly visible on bees and the queen was struggling so I gave them two strips of Apivar and wished them all the luck in the world.

The queen was a late autumn Italian she has now grown and is laying very well at last check last week two solid frames of brood and heaps of bees ...so as soon as get my health back I'll put them in a bigger box :)

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