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Ivy and heather

 

Several conflicting opinions exist about the overwintered bees in the ivy and heather honey. Some beekeepers feed to defend the autumn, even when the stores of ivy or heather are present. Others have successfully overwintered colonies in both crops. How do we know if we acted on the bees' best interests? With a little background knowledge, will tell us soon.

 

Morse and Hooper Encyclopedia of Beekeeping describes the crystallization of winterized tents, and how it can lead to dysentery and hunger if there is no water supply. Ivy Honey has a low moisture content and is quick to crystallize, which may make it difficult for bees to use. Honeybees hibernate ivy requires a source of water nearby (though not directly in front of the hive, and they defecate in it and spread of the disease), and you may have to offer now thick syrup to complement hard set stores.

 

Heather honey does not crystallize, but poses a different problem. Dark molasses and brown sugar because of the bees produce more waste than the light honey and white sugar. This in turn leads to those who need cleaning more flights during the winter. With our mild winters (mine flew to December), this is not a problem for many bees.

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Tutin contamination of honey

Tutin toxicity results of honey bees gathering honey from honeydew exudate of the sap-sucking insects commonly known as the passion vine hopper, when these vine hoppers have been feeding on the sap of tutu ( Coriaria arborea) bushes. Toxic honey is a rare event and is more likely to occur when comb honey is eaten directly from a hive that has been the melon harvest passion vine hoppers feed on plant tutu.

 

Time limits for maximum levels of Tutin in honey and comb honey is in Australia and New Zealand Food Standards Code (Standard 1.4.1). The maximum level of Tutin in honey is 2 milligrams per kilogram and the highest level of comb honey Tutin is 0.1 milligrams per kilogram.

 

Honey can be toxic to humans?

Certain flowers honey called "mad" honey. Occurs when the bees collect the nectar of rhododendrons, azaleas (Rhododendron genus both members) or mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia), the flowers whose nectar contains chemicals called grayanotoxins, which are psychoactive and toxic to humans, but not to bees. Its effects are short lived, and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, sweating and dizziness. Abdulkadir Gunduz and colleagues from Turkey report that "mad" honey is locally used in folk medicine as an alternative treatment for a variety of medical conditions such as gastrointestinal pain and hypertension, these statements have not been proven in medical tests appropriate, however.

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I have an Irish beekeeper friend who gets quite a lot of ivy honey. bees certainly work ivy very freely . Another friend who keeps bees on bluff hill Napier got a lot of ivy honey last year, as far as I can see the main trouble with ivy honey is it tastes like it smells.its certainly not my favourite honey but is properly some homesick Irish people out there who would pay a real premium for a taste of home. As for feeding granulated honey it may be a problem in some places but we used to feed thousands of boxes of granulated manuka honey back to the hives every year with no problems.

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there

Tutin contamination of honey

Tutin toxicity results of honey bees gathering honey from honeydew exudate of the sap-sucking insects commonly known as the passion vine hopper, when these vine hoppers have been feeding on the sap of tutu ( Coriaria arborea) bushes. Toxic honey is a rare event and is more likely to occur when comb honey is eaten directly from a hive that has been the melon harvest passion vine hoppers feed on plant tutu.

 

Time limits for maximum levels of Tutin in honey and comb honey is in Australia and New Zealand Food Standards Code (Standard 1.4.1). The maximum level of Tutin in honey is 2 milligrams per kilogram and the highest level of comb honey Tutin is 0.1 milligrams per kilogram.

 

Honey can be toxic to humans?

Certain flowers honey called "mad" honey. Occurs when the bees collect the nectar of rhododendrons, azaleas (Rhododendron genus both members) or mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia), the flowers whose nectar contains chemicals called grayanotoxins, which are psychoactive and toxic to humans, but not to bees. Its effects are short lived, and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, sweating and dizziness. Abdulkadir Gunduz and colleagues from Turkey report that "mad" honey is locally used in folk medicine as an alternative treatment for a variety of medical conditions such as gastrointestinal pain and hypertension, these statements have not been proven in medical tests appropriate, however.

 

there was tutin in honey this last summer in exacted honey and the level were high

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Karaka nectar is extremely toxic to bees. But this subject probably rates its own forum.

There was indeed tutin found in honey this year but remember the levels set at 100 times lower than what is considered to be a harmful level. It can be a serious problem and once again this subject probably rates its own forum

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In UK ivy honey is pretty much our bees last chance to gather nectar and more importantly pollen before they stop flying for winter. Ivy honey is not harmful to humans or bees but it has an 'acquired' taste, shall we say. Some say tastes similar to ragwort - strong and a bit bitter. Some like it some don't. But we usually always leave it for the bees rather than harvest it.

Caroline

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