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Is the face of Beekeeping changing?

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when I came to my area 40 years ago there was more Manuka around.

since large areas have been undisturbed the bush has taken over

some places will only ever be suitable for Manuka but given half a chance the bush comes through and deprives it of light..

I have heard that comvita is planting some cut over forest in active Manuka in golden bay

that seems the future to me

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My reading of the paper Dave Black put up indicates that manuka populations were probably quite local until people came along and slashed & burnt thereby creating ideal conditions for it's spread. I wouldn't bet the stuff wouldn't take off like a rocket elsewhere.

That may well be the case but in a different environment would it be the same plant?

If you had to bank on it, I would be considered "RISKY"

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I didn't finally appeared to have grasped it, it was so load and clear I was struggling to hear the other part to your question.

As I said I think the subs for all hobbyist and commercials need to be looked at in the near future. But your argument doesn't wash just because you got 2 hives, the number of hives for hobbyists is xyz, if you choose to only have x then that's your choice, how many different levels do you want. does the person with 1 hive pay half of what you do?

 

Well, pay $25? There are commercial bees with cranes and all that don't bother paying the $150, not only the hobbyists with 1 or 2 hives. As for MPI and Fed Farmers and them greedy ones, are we sure we want them to run our show and allow all that import honey in just so we can sell them milk or timber, or who knows what else? Favouring one industry by damaging other doesn't seem very good to me, so maybe NBA need to look at putting the fees down right now, so numbers lobbying increase and we can really make some noise.

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Could it be that the import honey etc is the beginning of a system of procedures and protocols that will enable the country to import bees in an emergency, Given the importance of our primary industries and their reliance on bees

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Could it be that the import honey etc is the beginning of a system of procedures and protocols that will enable the country to import bees in an emergency, Given the importance of our primary industries and their reliance on bees

I hope not. Once that door is open, a flood of everything we don't want will ride the wave in as well :devil:.

If bees ever needed importing in an emergency, it would need to be difficult and managed on a case by case basis

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We have to ask ourselves (beekeepers) "who" befits from importing honey into New Zealand or Australia for that matter, I suggest not Beekeepers in either country, we have the most to lose and the powers to be do not care two hoots. Our incomes will go down and in some cases destroyed by increased costs, disease mitigation, and lower honey prices. The consumer will not benefit as big business will always charge the consumer as much as the market will stand. So I ask again WHO will benefit from these trade deals....do not be fooled!!!!!!!! International trade deals represent trade wars, wars which will give primary production into the hands of corporations. These corporations will own everything from the nectar source to the marketing and we present day beekeepers will be the pitiful slaves of industry.

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Urbanisation has marginalised primary industry. There are many more consumers than there are primary producers. Therefore corporations pandering to consumers' materialistic needs will achieve a greater share of the vote by proxy. The system is broken :sick:

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I hope not. Once that door is open, a flood of everything we don't want will ride the wave in as well :devil:.

If bees ever needed importing in an emergency, it would need to be difficult and managed on a case by case basis

Thats right, but there probably needs to be protocols in place to make it possible should the need arise.

Protocols cost time and money so its best to have them sorted in advance.

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Thats right, but there probably needs to be protocols in place to make it possible should the need arise.

Protocols cost time and money so its best to have them sorted in advance.

You can keep your protocols.

If you build a road someone will use it, THAT road we don't want.

So many examples of trouble finding it's way into this country by accident. We dont need any more.

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Thats right, but there probably needs to be protocols in place to make it possible should the need arise.

Protocols cost time and money so its best to have them sorted in advance.

Funny how the time and money arguments seem to melt away when there is a clear and present need. I expect country-wide collapse of pollination would get plenty of attention, time and money thrown at it.

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Funny how the time and money arguments seem to melt away when there is a clear and present need. I expect country-wide collapse of pollination would get plenty of attention, time and money thrown at it.

 

A similar thing happened when farmers, Who had strong representation in parliament, decided they could not continue to farm alongside rabbits.

Against good advice mustelids were introduced.

One would expect that in the same situation with bee collapse, history wouldn't be repeated.

Putting protocols in place now, well in advance, bees could be imported safely if need be.

Appropriate quarantines etc take a lot of time to organise.

There simply wouldn't be a safe quick way to get emergency bees here.

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when I came to my area 40 years ago there was more Manuka around.

since large areas have been undisturbed the bush has taken over

some places will only ever be suitable for Manuka but given half a chance the bush comes through and deprives it of light..

I have heard that comvita is planting some cut over forest in active Manuka in golden bay

that seems the future to me

I have a masters in botany & what a lot of people don't know is that Manuka has a mychorhizal fungi in association with its roots and that it will do a lot better in having that association (in saying that the fungi is probably all over the place in NZ) I like some of the comments on this thread...From an ecological point of view Kaihoka is dead right, Manuka is a seral (pioneer) species which thrives on disturbance.... it will be replaced by other vegetation at some point if another seed source of a new species is available. I consider myself a greenie as I used to work for DOC as a forest ecologist, but I am also pragmatic, we probably need to manage regenerating bush by harvesting it and then re-establishing manuka on that site if we want to retain the vastness of our Manuka resource. If you want some interesting reading, google SEEDBALLING invented by Masanobu Fukuoka. It has been trialed in NZ to re-establish natives on steep coastal sites. If this technology was developed properly it may be possible to re-seed vast areas of country back into Manuka-now there a Phd worth funding from the Apiculture Industry.

One more note in areas of the Far North Taiwan Cherry, various species of Accacia and Hakea all have the ability to displace Manuka, this has been studied up here by DOC. This is more likely to occur in after fire if the weed species are present. This occurred around Kerikeri airport after a fire a few years ago.

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bees could be imported safely if need be.

 

I don't see how that would be possible if it is true that dwv came in with drone semen, how do you keep bugs like that out ?

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One more note in areas of the Far North Taiwan Cherry, various species of Accacia and Hakea all have the ability to displace Manuka, this has been studied up here by DOC. This is more likely to occur in after fire if the weed species are present. This occurred around Kerikeri airport after a fire a few years ago.

that is interesting

down the rd there is a small area of mixed scrub of manuka and hakea

i put my bees in the hakea in the winter and they do pretty well

but no one else seems as fond of hakea as me

i will keep an eye on it to see if it is taking over

Admin note: fixed quote box

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I don't see how that would be possible if it is true that dwv came in with drone semen, how do you keep bugs like that out ?

Worst case scenario is that DWV is better than having no bees.

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One more note in areas of the Far North Taiwan Cherry, various species of Accacia and Hakea all have the ability to displace Manuka, this has been studied up here by DOC. This is more likely to occur in after fire if the weed species are present. This occurred around Kerikeri airport after a fire a few years ago.

that is interesting

down the rd there is a small area of mixed scrub of manuka and hakea

i put my bees in the hakea in the winter and they do pretty well

but no one else seems as fond of hakea as me

i will keep an eye on it to see if it is taking over

As I said I am a pragmatist and lots of the weeds DOC hates are awesome bee-food, but there are some cases where they out compete our natives. Do you have Tree Privet down your way that seems to be a bad roadside weed up here I wonder what the value is of it in terms of bee fodder. It would be good for you to make some observations a cooler climate might make the hakea less competitive.

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One more note in areas of the Far North Taiwan Cherry, various species of Accacia and Hakea all have the ability to displace Manuka, this has been studied up here by DOC. This is more likely to occur in after fire if the weed species are present. This occurred around Kerikeri airport after a fire a few years ago.

that is interesting

down the rd there is a small area of mixed scrub of manuka and hakea

i put my bees in the hakea in the winter and they do pretty well

but no one else seems as fond of hakea as me

i will keep an eye on it to see if it is taking over

Wow I just read you are from down Whanganui inlet way that's such a cool place I went to the Anatouri River once (is that how its spelt?) You certainly have got a lot of bush down there and scrub for bees. Do you know Gerard Hindmarsh?

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Cotoneaster seems to me to be taking over the Nth Is

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it is spelt Anatori

and yes everybody knows him

it is nice place but we have a bit of wind

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Wow I just read you are from down Whanganui inlet way that's such a cool place I went to the Anatouri River once (is that how its spelt?) You certainly have got a lot of bush down there and scrub for bees. Do you know Gerard Hindmarsh?

i always thought the far north would be a real cool place

warm

no wind

kauri forests

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How much wind compared to Dannevirke, cos man they got wind, i think it's diet related

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How much wind compared to Dannevirke, cos man they got wind, i think it's diet related

we have a weather station and in the spring we can have 400klm wind runs in a day

thats how much has gone through our anemometer

some places up north have like 30klm wind run each day.

maybe thats not Dannevirke

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don't think it would be the westcoast of the north island either. will find out when i get the weather station. always seems to be blowing here

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don't think it would be the westcoast of the north island either. will find out when i get the weather station. always seems to be blowing here

get a decent one there

so the cups don't blow off

it is always good to hear other people have wind, i could get quite neurotic about being the only one

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Gerards my wife's uncle we come down your way occasionally, I reckon The able tasman and Kahurangi are up there with coolest places in the NZ easy. Is that a Southern Rata in your Avataar pic?

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