Jump to content

Plant identification


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 93
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 1 month later...
Hoheria?

i've just been looking at google image results for Hoheria too :)

 

I wonder about the inconsistency vs leaf colour but that's probably due to the light/camera conditions. @dansar - get a small branch with flowers on it and compare it to online high-res photos of Hoheria to confirm.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hoheria but do the bees like it ?

From one of the bibles (page 6 Nectar and Pollen Sources of NZ)

 

Houhere (Hoheria populnea).

 

A small forest tree, up to 12m high, also known as lacebark, yielding abundance of nectar mainly in May. The flowers are white and star shaped and bloom in such profusion that the leaves are frequently concealed. In favourable seasons, and May is generally a good month for nectar gathering in Auckland, the bees obtain a surplus from this source. Flowering period extends from March until May. The honey is medium amber in colour with a strong but not unpleasant flavour. It is light bodied and if the cappings are bruised runs very freely.

 

also

Nectar and Pollen sources in March | NZ Beekeepers Forum

Link to post
Share on other sites
i've just been looking at google image results for Hoheria too :)

 

I wonder about the inconsistency vs leaf colour but that's probably due to the light/camera conditions. @dansar - get a small branch with flowers on it and compare it to online high-res photos of Hoheria to confirm.

Ribbon wood. Lacewood, Houhere. Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

lacebark hoheria . light coloured pollen and useful for winter feed but doesn't produce much of a surplus at least not round here. Still it is the last of the Bush flows and as such a very useful tree. Don't know about flowering in May. Around here it would be well finished by then.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

We have this bush growing in the area and I was hoping someone might be able to identify it. It grows to about 2.0m high max but generally smaller. The off cut in the picture is about 30cm long. It's pretty common, but I'm curious to find out what it's called.

image.jpg.f748a2aeddc4ea21e774714434e9d884.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think you'll find it's Spanish Heath. DoC & others doesn't like it

Thanks. Like most the plants in our area I'm not surprised it's on the DoC hit list, but on the plus side at least some of them are good for the bees :) .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Spanish Heath, also known as Spanish Heather. Bees collect a pale pink pollen and nectar through winter and early spring. The benefit of the resouces collected is sometimes almost outweighed by bees lost, caught out in changeable winter weather trying to get it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Definitely a caprosma. Male and female flowers found on different plants. Probably karamu . Linda from trees for bees lists this as a good source of quality pollen but I told her I had never seen bees working it. The next week I saw bees working it flat out which just goes to show I don't know everything. Nevertheless this is a plant designed to be pollinated by wind and does not have nectar. Caprosma are related to coffee and their fruit is edible but not highly palatable except perhaps for sand caprosma which I have enjoyed on several occasions. Caprosma is worth planting just for the fruit it provides for native birds.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...