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depends on how tight the wallet is :unsure:

apistan/bayvarol should still be effective. however i would go apivar in spring. just watch out for the longer treatment time.

then bayvarol in autumn. .

 

do yourself a big favor and put a site aside and trail some alternative treatments. get it all worked out before your forced to roll it out across all the hives.

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So why is someone who advertises themselves as a long established commercial beekeeper and queen breeder (see their ads in the buy/sell section) asking about basic varroa control ?

And you can alternate apiVAR and BayVARol ...or... APIvar and APIstan but not bayvarol and apistan ... easy to remember?

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No knee -jerk reaction at all looking for new ideas .I thought this was great place for new ideas but was wrong . As always beekeeper going they only thing not going to share ideas just looking for negative as always

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there really hasn't been anything new in the 10 years or so. couple of easy to use versions of products have come in but basics haven't changed much. how to use them effectively in your operation is something no one can answer.

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So why is someone who advertises themselves as a long established commercial beekeeper and queen breeder (see their ads in the buy/sell section) asking about basic varroa control ?
Things like that happen, and can be when someone has been doing things the same way for a while & is (correctly) looking at alternatives.

 

Can remember around 3 years ago being surprised when a successful commercial beekeeper rang me at home asking urgent advice about treatments. He is an experienced beekeeper but turns out one thing he'd done wrong was used Apistan when varroa arrived here, it worked, so he just stayed with that spring and autumn without giving it much thought, till when he rang me in a panic, cos his bees were badly mite infested not long after treatment. This was going to cost him big bucks but the answer was simple, I just said he should try Apivar.

 

Simple yes, but he'd just got stuck in one way of doing things and hadn't given the matter much further thought. It happens, I'm glad people on the forum not afraid here to ask the basic questions, I know I have asked a few.

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Simple yes, but he'd just got stuck in one way of doing things and hadn't given the matter much further thought. It happens, I'm glad people on the forum not afraid here to ask the basic questions, I know I have asked a few.

If I could give you extra credit for this I would. Top answer (y)(y)

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No knee -jerk reaction at all looking for new ideas .I thought this was great place for new ideas but was wrong . As always beekeeper going they only thing not going to share ideas just looking for negative as always

 

I am having great results so far using nothing but Oxalic vapor treatments so am just going to continue with that as a sole treatment. When I first got into bee keeping as a hobby I became disheartened by the over priced treatments that most people are using and found with the monitoring for resistance and mucking around with sugar shakes or drowning bees in meths and god knows what else that for all the hassle I actually lost a large percentage of hives. This year I am finding no losses and all my hives are looking very healthy. My belief is that if you can work out what is the best system of Oxalic treatments, that attacks the Varroa at key times during the year that you can keep the Varroa suppressed very well without paying through the nose for Apistan etc. I am also finding that using this style of treating there is no need to piss off your bees because the first treatment tells you the level of Varroa in the hive. It is just part of that series of treatments. Down side, it is time consuming but for me the results have proven worth it. Cheap and effective.

 

Admin note: fixed quote

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Down side, it is time consuming but for me the results have proven worth it. Cheap and effective.

for commercial beekeeping time is a huge issue.

its not as simple as having a treatment that works, its being able to actually do it within the time constraints you have.

 

oxalic, formic, thymol etc etc have all been tested with plenty of published results and many have commercial products available, but its being able to integrate or modify the beekeeping to work in with it. thats why i suggest run a test site to work out the kinks, the timings and staff levels.

not monitoring and hoping a system works is foolhardy. but if you can create a system that is proven to work well and doesn't need monitoring then go for it.

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for commercial beekeeping time is a huge issue.

its not as simple as having a treatment that works, its being able to actually do it within the time constraints you have.

 

oxalic, formic, thymol etc etc have all been tested with plenty of published results and many have commercial products available, but its being able to integrate or modify the beekeeping to work in with it. thats why i suggest run a test site to work out the kinks, the timings and staff levels.

not monitoring and hoping a system works is foolhardy. but if you can create a system that is proven to work well and doesn't need monitoring then go for it.

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Your comments are right on Tristan.

 

I did some hives last autumn with Nassenheider formic acid, cost was only around a quarter of what strips would have been.

 

But time was huge in comparison. For me though, I only have a small number of hives, so I have the time, it was worth it. But someone paying staff would have to do his sums.

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Sorry mate and thought you may be telepathic. What I was wanting to add is that I am monitoring the hives every time I treat. I will be treating in the Spring as the hives build up and then twice heading in to Winter once the honey comes off.Once when the honey boxes first come off and then one last time as we start going into the colder days. In between I will be monitoring my hives visually for general hive health.This is how my treatments went this year and I am convinced that the hives are in far better condition this year then last. The beauty of oxalic is that it is easy on the queen, and has no effect on brood laying etc. Also not having to worry about resistance is also another plus. I am sold on it as a treatment and although first being weary of fogging acid into my hives as a treatment am totally happy with my results so far.

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