Jump to content

Using New Zealand Resources: Advice for beekeepers


Beehavn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thanks Beehavn, a good read.

I too have been looking for information to learn from. I am using this forum and acting like a sponge - there are a lot of knowledgeable people out there - and sorting out in my head what makes sense and what neeeds further investigation. I also bought the book Practical Beekping in NZ which has a lot of good up to date info, including the legal side.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of receiving a smack on the hand, we cant suffer from tall poppy syndrome. Do we therefore disregard anything anyone says if they live out side NZ's waters? Lets restrict members then! Sure we have a unique environment and conditions but we are still babies when it comes to most things. If we always do what we have always done, we will always get what we always got. Is someone able to direct me to legislation that states shook swarming FOR VARROA CONTROL is illegal? Yes it is an illegal strategy for the control of AFB but we are not talking about AFB, we are talking about varroa. We also have to look at the intent of the law and not just generalise that if it applies for this then it applies for that. Beehaven, I soak your wisdom like a sponge. You will have forgotten more than I will ever know but it just grates me when someone says "the law says you cant do this or that" when the opposite may very well be true. The anti smacking law is a prime example. Just because the law exists it does not stop what it intended to. I am not saying lets just jump in on the first "new theory" that comes along, but at the same time lets not discount it but question, research, trial and then decide. This takes years, I know, but will never be tried if it never gets the chance. We need to be trying as much as possible to see what will work here and to see what works best for our conditions. Being responsible for thousands of lives scares the s*$%t out of me. I just want to do the best I can, legal or not

 

There are several very good points made there, but they have a high risk of taking us off topic. As I have said before I struggled with challenging the knowledge at the time, but I've not left it there, I have been researching further and learning from it. The disruption and rudeness was my main priority and I was hoping to start up another topic to dicsuss the issues raised, once the dust had settled. Perhaps now is that time.

 

I'll do what I did with this topic, and copy your post in full here as a quote. The move your original post and any subsequent replies to a new area at Shook swarming in New Zealand

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...

As with anything found on the web, its important for the reader to use common sense and logic to decide for themselves if what they are reading and what they are living will coexist... as a strong proponent of acclimation in bee stocks for continued development in survivability and production, I have been quoted many times warning people of the ill effects that following the directions that one book may give, when it was written by a bee keeper in a vastly different climate than the reader is in... in forums, I have warned about the damages that could come from a reader following instructions and schedules of a poster that is in a different climate with a different set of circumstances to consider... that being said, there are still many other forms of information that can be useful and are not location dependant... as well as a broad spectrum of ideals which vary in importance depending upon the type of beekeeping a person participates in... for example, a honey producer may put much more care into selecting locations and limiting feeding schedules that a package producer would, as the package producer will need brood and the source of the food is far less important so even during a flow, syrup is fine with him... so even though they are in the same climate, there are certain types of advice that they should simply ignore from one another... however, they can still be useful advisors to one another on different subjects... for example, the package producer may well be excellent at getting early queens reared and mated for his packages, while the honey producer has been buying all of the queens he uses in his early splits... by learning from the package producer, the honey producer could start rearing and mating his own queens, save some profits, and better his own stock for the future...

 

There is also an array of science that a region can learn from... if one area makes mistakes, learn from them so that your area will not do the same... varroa, ahb, SHB, etc, are all issues that have been faced somewhere else first... rather than turning the other cheek, using the forums like this one can connect people to others who have faced troubles with issues that are new to them... decades of research, not only by government groups, but by the beekeepers themselves can bring quick resolve to issues in areas that are just beginning their battles...

 

The knowledge gained during each person's beekeeping endeavour may be very different, and as such, everyone should take the time to first give any advice a "common sense test", then communicate with others around them about the idea... in the forum community, this is usually helped along by having so many local and non-local posters in each conversation... if someone gives advice that no one else agrees with, it should be obvious that this advice is not sound... there are many out there that seem to be on a mission to "reinvent the wheel", and this holds true for nearly every industry... there is nothing wrong with tinkering, but when the advice you seek is relative to life-and-death of colonies, the common consensus is the best route to take... just my two cents... Merry Christmas to all my kiwi friends!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Icommentator on this site, made recommendations that don't comply with NZ law. For example he mis-interpreted what was said about oxalis (I never said it was illegal - just that if used it had to be used in a manner compliant with NZ regulations laid out in NZ law).

 

 

Has the law regarding oxalis been amended since this post ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Hi Dansar,

 

Thx for the comment. Just getting started on the forum and working my way thro the posts. Looks like great resource of knowledge. I was part of similar forum in UK which was great and found it very useful even with multiple answers for one question. I was and am a hobby beekeeper because I find them fascinating and like to think I'm doing my (very) little bit in keeping bees alive and well. Looking forward to learning the nuances of beekeeping in this fantastic country.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

In my TB, I had Lang supers on at 90 degrees to the brood bars. The bees were not fazed in the least (i.e. no problems). I imagine that it would be more efficent to have them all alligned, however - if nothing else, it should be easier for the bees to regulate air flow if all the combs are aligned.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...