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Rob Stockley

What's the connection between 1080 and bees?

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Just got a leaflet in the mail addressed to President, NBA advising details of planned aerial 1080 programme in HB. Why is it that beekeepers are being advised? Is it simply that we may be operating hives in the area and might come across the baits? Or is there some direct or indirect risk to bees?

 

I'm not asking whether 1080 is good, bad or otherwise. Just trying to understand the connection to bees if there is one. There's an established thread for discussing 1080 generally here

http://www.nzbees.net/forum/threads/1080-everybody-knows.5606/

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it's about the beekeepers, rather than the bees. the fact that beekeepers operate in the areas where drops are happening makes us a 'stakeholder' to be notified for safety purposes.

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I think @Roy Arbon has a theory that the 1080 dust can poisen bees if dropped when trees are flowering / producing eg Rata and Beech honey dew.

 

I dont know if its been proven but it seems like there could be some truth in it.

.

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More about the beekeeper I think, be careful especially if your wife, kids or your dog goes to work with you.

With it being aerial it lands where it lands, not tucked away in bait stations .

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The notification to you was for your safety.

 

Yes, Roy has claimed 1080 was detected in some of his rata honey.

 

It's not the purpose of the notification, but If rata is important to you, the other thing for a beekeeper to consider is that in the years following a drop, there will be a lot more rata.

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I disagree slightly Alistair.The Rata has been around foe years.Rata will still be here even if the 1080 was stopped.Thinkabout back to 1980s rata is still around.The opossum is an introduced pest but does not actually carry tb.The cattle pass it on to opposums.1080 kills evedything.Invertibrates included.So when the kiwi eats the grubs it gets secondary poisoning soask some,qestions when 1080 is dropped.

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I never claimed 1080 was detected in my honey.I said I was stopped exporting Organic honey to the usa as 1080 had been dropped.

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Thanks all for your replies. I have the answer I was looking for.

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I never claimed 1080 was detected in my honey.I said I was stopped exporting Organic honey to the usa as 1080 had been dropped.
Oh my apologies Roy, I must have misunderstood your posts about it.
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There has been a documented connection between 1080 and poisoning of bees. Back in 1988 'jam bait' containing 1080 for possum control was used around the Te Kuiti area. Unknown to the manufacturer the supplier of the raw material used sugar in a batch that attracted bees who took it back to the hives. Inspection of honey comb showed green cells from the dye used in the jam bait to prevent birds eating it.

"Wallaceville testing found 2.2mg/kg of 1080 in the green honey, but were unable to find the 1080 in the dead bees". Pictures from John Bassett, retired beekeeper from the Te Kuiti area.

Today no sugar or sweeteners are used in vertebrate toxic baits for rats, possums and mustelids .

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5992eae8c58f7_1080Jambaitpicture4.jpg.693910db96fff155679ab9dc7d5bb835.jpg

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I agree with e

There has been a documented connection between 1080 and poisoning of bees. Back in 1988 'jam bait' containing 1080 for possum control was used around the Te Kuiti area. Unknown to the manufacturer the supplier of the raw material used sugar in a batch that attracted bees who took it back to the hives. Inspection of honey comb showed green cells from the dye used in the jam bait to prevent birds eating it.

"Wallaceville testing found 2.2mg/kg of 1080 in the green honey, but were unable to find the 1080 in the dead bees". Pictures from John Bassett, retired beekeeper from the Te Kuiti area.

Today no sugar or sweeteners are used in vertebrate toxic baits for rats, possums and mustelids .[/QU

I agree with everything you say except the last piece.Landcare did the trial with nucs at Marewhiti about 2 or 3 yrs ago.These hives were quite a long way from the drop zone.The nucs had to be fed sugar to stay alive and not a trace of 1080 was found in the honey.Under USDAorganic certification and I need to be use there standards if any chemicals have been used whitih a 3 km radius then the honey can not be exportedbas Organic and1080 has beenbused.

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Morning Roy,

I believe that your problem is with the US Department of Agriculture Organic protocols and not the scientific data researched by Landcare.

Landcare Research can for 1080 contamination of water and or where else it can enter the food chain.

The Landcare Research Toxicology Laboratory – analyses and advice for vertebrate pesticide testing | Kararehe Kino Issue 25 | Landcare Research

Landcare do not test for compliance with other jurisdictions organic certification rules.

It is excellent news that honey was not contaminated in the trials the results of which you quote.

 

I have had a quick look at the USDA Organic protocols and I think you are going to have a major problem in ensuring compliance with their protocol for Wild Crop Harvesting as anexample. http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5090757

For organic honey production with widely ranging foraging bees compliance is a major issue. example is the changing NZ Tutin in Honey Food Standard.

The NZ Experience

When MAF first introduced Tutin bee foraging area controls, they initially used a 3 km radius from the hive, which had to be significantly free of Tutu plants[1]. Local research into foraging distance of honey bees from hives showed bees were travelling up to 5km from the hive, so the 2010 Food (Tutin Honey Standard) 2010, was changed to read “the predictable range of bee foraging from the geographical location” of the apiary[2].

Bees are industrious and hardy workers who can travel some substantial distance from the hive to seek nectar and pollen. Putting a defined limit on this by any regulator is a real challenge.

So clearly MAF (now MPI) took away the easy option and opened up the range in favour of the bees but not the beekeeper.

 

Personal declaration; I support the use of 1080 to control introduced pests in order to protect NZ native bird life as documented by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment.

 

[1] Section 13, Food( Tutin in honey) Standard 2008 - http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/Food_Tutin-Sets_Maximum.pdf

 

[2] Section 10 Food (Tutin in honey) Standard 2010. http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/elibrary/industry/tutin-honey-standard-2010.pdf

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Good on you for thinking 1080 is the great thing to use.It shows me you are like the test of N.Z. 1080 is being dropped wherethere are no opossums.Mt Roy CenralOtago.Now tell me what kiwis and wekas feed on.Not nectar but small insects in the ground.Have a look and see how many keas have been killed by 1080 compared to,being shot.I am talking recent times now.1080 reminds me of agent orange or ddt.Noit is not now but future generations will pay for our folly as we are doing now for Vietnam vet sibblings suffering from the effect of agent orange.

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See the effects of agent orange every day here...A neighbours husband was an army cook in Vietnam the water they cooked there food in for the troops was contaminated with agent orange, wife and children all affected...birth defects and continued health problems.

Could be a lump of 1080 a puddle with bees taking water from it out there..

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Next thing you know 1080 will be blamed for Chernobyl

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In the absence of people, Chernobyl has turned into a wildlife paradise.

 

Google it, it's a great read. The wolves and other wildlife have a much shorter lifespan than humans, so are less affected by cancers etc, the area is reverting back to what it was centuries ago with naturally balancing ecosystems.

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I like the tree growing through the floor of the indoor basketball court..there was documentary on tv about it..A good indication of life after man :)

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The reason I have bought this up is a year or two ago MPI tested a beekeepers honey for residues as they do.A residue was found in the honey at unacceptable levels.It was found the bees were drinking water from a trough a farmer used to dose his pigs.So you have to be very careful where you put your bees.

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Never heard of drench administered like that, what was he dosing them with?

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No idea but it was an outdoor piggery

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It may have been copper or some other trough cleaner

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maybe a mineral or trace element for a water dispensed system, but drench isn't something you would dispense this way due to the inaccuracy of intake.

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No it was a chemical not allowed in honey Copper can be found in honey especially in boxes treated wit Copper Napthenate. When I was with Biogro the heavy metal standards were 10%of the allowable copper in the honey. After 40 yrs use with bees, wax and all the associated product my honey was tested and found to have higher than allowable limits for copper under the organic standards. This shows how careful we have to be with chemicals around bee hives.

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Where did the copper come from, your boxes were treated?

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