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Rob Stockley

NZBF Hoffman vs Manley Frames

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I've been studying hiveware dimensions with a view to building a few nuc boxes for next spring. All my frames, brood and honey, are Hoffman frames. I've just noticed that Manley frames are 10mm deeper. Is this difference intended to fill the beespace between honey supers? If so wouldn't the bees propolise all the frames together? Cleaning burr comb from top/bottom bars is a nuisance (my beespace can't be quite correct) but I imagine breaking 8-9 bottom bars worth of propolis would be worse.

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Disregard. I've misread the instruction. Manley end bars are 10mm wider than Hoffman end bars. End bar length is the same for both FD=230mm.

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And some honey extractors don't take Manleys because of their width - good to check before buying,

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I still find the odd Manley cropping up in the brood boxes of the hives I manage, and I really don't like them. They're a right pain when making up nucs, for example, because they just don't fit. Fortunately they're nearly all rotted out now, so by next season they'll be gone.

 

If you're considering making frames, Rob, have a look at John Berry's simplicity frames. Alan's probably got some, or I've got some I made last year for comb honey. I have a feeling there's a post on here somewhere with dimensions as well - maybe @dansar?.

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simplicity frames are a pain. no wonder they changed the design.

manley are really meant for supers only. typically run as 8 frame per box.

i would stick to hoffman as having multiple sizes unnecessarily complicates things

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Have a look at my Youtube video of the simplicity frames I have made based on Johns dimensions. I make the top bar differently and it works really well. these are strong frames.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7YnmPb_gRA

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yes they are strong. i still curse the things and wish they would hurry up and break!

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I ain't arguing with you, Tristan, because by and large I'm sticking with my beautiful Hoffmans too, but why do you consider simplicitys a pain?

Is it the making or the using, and why?

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but why do you consider simplicitys a pain?

the long sides get proplized to each other and the box, and make for very hard removal.

its actually not that difficult to make the rebate. you can do it on a buzzer easy enough.

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@deejaycee I think I've figured out what I'd like to do with bees. I'd like to help others get into hobby beekeeping. To that end and for my own edification, next spring I'm planning to do a little queen rearing and nucleus building.

 

I've been looking at making my own boxes and frames for a while. Materials are not cheap and that got me thinking, what type of nuc box would best suit my needs? The Internet is full of designs and what I'm doing isn't anything new. Regardless, I enjoy building and decided to combine the best of what I found into something I could easily construct.

 

The attached PDF shows a standard Langstroth hive body. I'll probably set the width based on five frames. I've included a removable base for two reasons; the base can be replaced with a closed cage for cell building, and a standard body can be supered. The top feeder design was pointed out to me by @dansar or @tristan I think. I like the idea of topping up without necessarily having to crack open the hive and potentially upsetting the bees. I've included a standard full width entrance because I think that aids ventilation and I also want it to be suitable for a formic acid vaporiser. I'll use removable blocks as entrance reducers.

 

So early days. I don't even have a saw table yet. But that's where I'm headed.

Beehive NUC box-Layout.pdf

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I am sure you mean Oxalic Acid vaporiser

Yup, that's the one :rolleyes:

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Then you also need to allow room for the vaporiser to fit into the hive.

I added an extra 10mm to the bottom of the box. From 230mm to 240mm height.

Works a treat.

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Then you also need to allow room for the vaporiser to fit into the hive.

I added an extra 10mm to the bottom of the box. From 230mm to 240mm height.

Works a treat.

There's a 10mm rim on the base. So that's a 10mm entrance and 18mm from the base to the bottom of the frames. Do you run the vaporiser any differently on a nuc given the smaller volume?

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No difference. Just the quantity of OA. 5 gms for 5 frames, 10 gms for 10 frame, 15 gms for 20 frames.

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For info

 

I use Manley frames in my honey supers. My National hives take 11 normal frames in a super. With the wider end bars on the self-spacing Manley frames 10 new frames fit in a super (equivalent to 9 frames in a Langstroth ). I start new Manley frames and foundation at 10 frames to a honey super. After the first season I increase the spacing to get 9 frames in a super (equivalent to 8 frames in a Lang ). This wider spacing stops the edges of the end bars being propolized to make a solid mass.

 

I prefer using Manleys since it means less frames to uncap and extract for the same amount of honey.

  • Good Info 1

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On 14/04/2015 at 2:09 AM, Barbarian said:

For info

 

I use Manley frames in my honey supers. My National hives take 11 normal frames in a super. With the wider end bars on the self-spacing Manley frames 10 new frames fit in a super (equivalent to 9 frames in a Langstroth ). I start new Manley frames and foundation at 10 frames to a honey super. After the first season I increase the spacing to get 9 frames in a super (equivalent to 8 frames in a Lang ). This wider spacing stops the edges of the end bars being propolized to make a solid mass.

 

I prefer using Manleys since it means less frames to uncap and extract for the same amount of honey.

I needed some new super frames and pondered the uncapping 'saving.' I guess I should go either Hoffman OR Manley as mixing and matching would create problems.

Anyone else willing to share their thoughts on pros and cons?

.

Edited by Lizzy
Wanted to tick Notify me of replies.

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5 hours ago, Lizzy said:

I needed some new super frames and pondered the uncapping 'saving.' I guess I should go either Hoffman OR Manley as mixing and matching would create problems.

Anyone else willing to share their thoughts on pros and cons?

.

its a whole lot easier to use only one size of frames. you can use different size supers it just add complexity. we run FD brood and mostly 3/4 supers with a mix of frames sizes. i can assure you it can get annoying. it makes it very difficult to get replacement FD brood frames.

manley are 3/4's only. . a lot of people use 3/4 boxes to keep weight down but a full 3/4 with manleys weighs similar to an FD super.

manley are prone to breaking lugs off the frames.

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just stick with Hoffmans, Manleys defeat the principle of consistency across boxes and just cause annoyance later on

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