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I read over the weekend (wish I could remember where) about a new concept....the Flow Queen Apiary....

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I did a dumb thing this morning - after the honey spill - ants lots of ants - that was ok - hot soapy water fixed

them - used a syringe to dose the ones inside on the combs - eating honey and brood but i left the lid open

and the obvious happened - ive since move the hives to cool area and covered with a sheet - does not look like this is going to upload here its is in the media section maybe -- ill try to link it

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some of you guys are harsh - you miss words like - would love to - not for profit - and the cost is also a factor

average 200 a pop - i think thats slow enough for me - how about asking people to join your apiary or vice versa

for example - my area may be better than yours then later other may happen

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I think the penny has just dropped that this guy is having us on, so no need for beekeepers to grab chest and hit the deck.

 

@deejaycee please confirm ....

 

If not, woe, how do we stop him ?

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Please tell us what the hell is in the bowl. It's obviously attractive to bees. Get rid of it.

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bits of comb honey trying to calm the bees - get them to stop killing off the two weaker boxes

- i harvested them two - three to four frames mostly capd - one to two frames brood - they went back into

the first nucs - now ive only got three boxes going - == ;(

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bits of comb honey trying to calm the bees - get them to stop killing off the two weaker boxes

That won't work, but I think you found that out by now. I think everyone's advice would be to take a step back, ask lots of questions, read lots, join the local club and get a mentor.

 

Beekeeping is not as easy as people think and you can learn the hard way or the harder way.

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some of you guys are harsh

 

try thinking of it as direct rather than harsh.

 

unfortunately, Aloft, you've made a couple of missteps that aren't obvious to you, but ring loud alarm bells for more experienced beekeepers. and most of us have paid some sort of price, often more than once, for similar mistakes made by ourselves or others... hence the reactions. don't take it to heart.. just keep listening.

 

One of the first rules of beekeeping is never to open feed honey - leave honey out for bees to eat outside a hive. The year-round primary reason for that is disease control. If you have an early or undiagnosed case of foulbrood in your hive, that plate of honey could result in the burning of your hives and any number of hives within a several kilometre range.

 

At this time of the year though, autumn is arriving and as you've seen the bees become aggressive, robbing honey from whatever source they see as weak enough to take on. Weak or small hives, and particularly queenless hives (a queenless nuc is a double-whammy!) are easy targets for marauding robber bees from both your other hives and any other hive within flying range. I'll guarantee you that all of those bees do not belong to your own hives - there is always visitation going on between apiaries and at this time of year there is quite intense observation hives by each other looking for any openings.

 

Your bowl of comb is as good as painting a bullseye in front of your hives.

 

From later February through to winter shutdown we make a particular point of working carefully in hives, not dropping any comb or honey outside the hive, and getting in and out as quickly as possible.

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I think the penny has just dropped that this guy is having us on

i agree, just winding people up for a laugh.

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bits of comb honey trying to calm the bees - get them to stop killing off the two weaker boxes

- i harvested them two - three to four frames mostly capd - one to two frames brood - they went back into

the first nucs - now ive only got three boxes going - == ;(

The extra honey will just encourage the bees to keep robbing, including the nucs. So best to remove that honey.

 

Also take all honeycomb you can out of the nucs just leave the minimum you can in there. It sounds like it may be too late but these are steps you can try. Don't worry about the bees not having enough to eat because they will not have enough to eat if they get robbed out anyway, the main thing is to stop the robbers by removing anything for them to rob.

 

If you do that and the robbing stops in a day or so, then post and we'll tell you what to do next.

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had queens so took out a few frames put in old nuc box nylon fishing line they ate thru it

as i said almost - there were four frame in the box - cut around the queen cell - it is now in my

pc case - its warm got a few workers in there - little plastic container - take a picture if you want

how did the queen in the pc case go?

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The way you introduced yourself in your other topics, I thought you were a commercial beekeeper.

Me too, it's probably obvious but I'm about the newest newbee you can find! Just so people know, more of a sponge than a tap!

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