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pollen patties

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Any one make pollen patties if so with what and how

 

Thanks

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google "fat bee skinny bee" download the pdf file. There are recipes for pollen substitutes within.

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I use "Feed Bee" as the base for mine. I buy the feed bee off in Wanganui, who imports it, then I mix it with 1:1 sugar syrup.

I make up a fair bit and then put handful size lumps into a pie bag, then store them in the deep freeze until I want them. They keep for ages.

 

Great product Feed Bee. You can find Neil's contact details in the NZ Beekeeper Mag.

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Mine don't like feedbee. Maybe it was the way I did it, but they never touched it. They just have to get their own pollen.

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Mine like feed bee sorry Janice. I use feed bee as a base and mix as follows 1 part brewers yeast 2 parts feed bee 1 sugar and warm sugar syrup to mix .I put an ice cream scoop in "scale paper" per hive and all goes well. A bee breeder John Fear gave me the recipe. On its own bee feed mixed with syrup can set like fibreglass and bees don't eat it. Maybe their mandibles buckle.

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Mine just have such a choice of forage @Geoff987 - they are spoilt

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I use the recipe from honeybeeworld.com . Those recipies , especially the one that contain pollen is the best one that I used so far . Try it an see how the bees take it , mine's are very happy .

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Read very carefully how to mix the patties because if you don't have the exact texture you could have some "hammer patties " that could crack a human head . The patties will start to harden as the time passes.

Good luck .

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I tried pollen substitute for a couple of years on some hives. Didn't seem to make any difference so I don't bother. If the bees can get enough pollen, then maybe they don't need anything else - or a different apiary with better forage?

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Two things

 

! ) does FEED BEE contain any natural honey / bee product ?

2 ) using natural pollen in a pattie mix, has got to be dangerous, don't you think ?

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2 ) using natural pollen in a pattie mix, has got to be dangerous, don't you think ?

 

Absolutely the way 1080 dust drifts around

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Two things

 

! ) does FEED BEE contain any natural honey / bee product ?

2 ) using natural pollen in a pattie mix, has got to be dangerous, don't you think ?

none in it that i know of.

afaik its not a straight replacement rather a supplement.

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2 ) using natural pollen in a pattie mix, has got to be dangerous, don't you think ?

 

just a thought......you imagen feeding PSA riddled pollen to bees and putting them into kiwifruit :eek: :whistle:

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Too late, that's probably how it spread so quick, along with birds rabbits &c

Frankly I'd like to see the whole thing go belly up

The toxic chemical stuff their spraying to keep the stinking crap going is absolutely no good for the environment !

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I collect pollen for human consumption.

A pollen collector is installed in front of the hive entrance.

The pollen is later sun dried and kept in plastic containers.

Every year there are surplus pollen more than our family requirements.

My method is - grind the granules into powder and mix with 1 to 2 syrup.

I make small amount whenever I need since the dried pollen and sugar forms are better for storing than patties.

I use them for 2 occasions.

First, at the of the season when I want more brood rearing for wintering bees. Bees that are born late autumn will spend the winter. I do not prolong pollen feeding in this case. The feeding is short just for late autumn.

Second, the longer feed is done for early spring when I want the bee population bigger before the main honey flow.

Pollen is basically protein, vitamin, mineral etc and used to raise brood in the form of royal jelly while the honey is carbohydrate and used as energy source.

In the old days, I helped my grandpa with his making pollen patties. His recipe was soy bean powder, barley powder and sugar. And the patties are given at early spring only. The reason was simply it is cheaper than natural pollen.

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My method is - grind the granules into powder and mix with 1 to 2 syrup.

I make small amount whenever I need since the dried pollen and sugar forms are better for storing than patties.

I use them for 2 occasions...........

 

its extremely bad practice to feed pollen back to beehives.

exactly the same as feeding honey back and for the same reasons, the old nasty AFB.

thats why "pollen patties" don't have pollen in them, they use replacements instead. just like we feed sugar instead of honey.

your granddad had it right.

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Personally don't have issues with feeding back honey or pollen. Just be thorough. Give everything AFB checks, get second opinion if unsure. Keep a good record if moving bee products around. Plenty of beekeepers swap brood/honey/pollen between hives and do this very successfully.

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Personally don't have issues with feeding back honey or pollen. Just be thorough. Give everything AFB checks, get second opinion if unsure. Keep a good record if moving bee products around. Plenty of beekeepers swap brood/honey/pollen between hives and do this very successfully.

 

its not about if they are successful or don't have issues.

its understanding the risk factors and implementing that in the hive management.

 

the single most successful way to spread AFB (and no doubt other diseases) is to swap brood/honey/pollen between hives.

 

i know of people who have wiped out most if not all of their hives due to that. sadly they also wiped out everyone else's hives in the aera as well.

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there's an interesting game you can play, at home or even with friends. All you need is an idiot, a six shot revolver and just one live round chambered ..... from memory, you spin the chamber, cock the pistol, hold the muzzle against your head and squeeze the trigger

NOW, there are two out comes, either your lucky or we are

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Use irradiated pollen. no issues.

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The pollen is collected at the hive entrance by using pollen collector.

Foragers bring in the fresh pollen from the field and it is intercepted at the hive entrance.

Then it is sun-dried. It is fresh. It has never been into the hive or in contact with nurse bees.

When it is completely dry it becomes hard in granule form.

That's why I grind them when I mix with syrup.

This is different pollen which is stored inside cells in the comb.

The pollen in the comb or pollen collected from inside-hive is not used to feed the other bees.

It is true that beekeepers spread disease by inter-changing frames from hive to hive. Therefore, I believe the langstroth frames tend to spread disease more easily than warre or top bar style which don't recycle the combs.

 

If it's true that the fresh pollen in the bee's legs coming from the field spread disease, then they are extinct long ago.

I have been with bees more than 50 years in my life.

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If it's true that the fresh pollen in the bee's legs coming from the field spread disease, then they are extinct long ago.

why would they?

they carry heaps of bacteria etc around with them all the time. why would it make them extinct?

you also forgot about all the bees going out of the hive spreading bacteria all over the pollen trap on their way out.

 

It is true that beekeepers spread disease by inter-changing frames from hive to hive. Therefore, I believe the langstroth frames tend to spread disease more easily than warre or top bar style which don't recycle the combs.

but warre and tob bar still recycle the gear, which if infected will spread it onto the next hive.

 

 

its extremely poor that some people promote certain methods without mentioning the risks or the downsides of doing things that way.

imho thats disgraceful for a so called 50 year beek. :(

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