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Walnut for treating varroa


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i have tried emailing these guys for more info, the trials were a long time ago and there must be more info, anyone know more about this or them. I want to use this and have tracked down some trees for leaves but want more detail on application. Plan to try on my home hives as it seems a bit time consuming and i can watch them closely. The email on the article is inactive

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  • 1 month later...

i never got a reply from the original article authors. From what i can understand its a matter of smoke,m up big time with smoker.

I would presume this irritates and causes mites to drop. On that basis i would have thought you would need to do it daily for a full hatching cycle of varroa .If it works by drop then a sticky board maybe a boost for success. I found some genuine research on it but nothing on application techniques.

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I had thought that maybe nicotine extract from the tobacco plant could work because it works well on the garden as a spray for mites, moths, caterpillars and parasites but I'm not game enough to try it on my bees at this stage. Does anyone have thoughts on that?

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I had thought that maybe nicotine extract from the tobacco plant could work ... Does anyone have thoughts on that?

Nicotine was used in the 1980s mostly as tobacco smoke, for diagnosis and control. Unfortunately nicotine is pretty poisonous, to mites, bees, and people. That's why we invented neonicotinoids ;)

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  • 8 months later...
In the document from the original poster it says they applied 1 minute of smoke to each hive, every 3 days for 30 days.

I've not read the document - but was there a control hive where just normal smoke (and no smoke for that matter) was used for the same frequency and time?

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Yeah, they had three groups, 5 hives treated with Apistan, 5 treated with Walnut Leaf Smoke as advised above, and 5 control hives.

 

They make the bold claim that Apistan was less effective than the Walnut Leaf smoke, however this was the US and in 2004 where fluvalinate resistance was pretty much universal - as I understand it.

 

The sample size is almost statistically irrelevant, and the document doesn't say anything about such basic experiment structure as using sister Queens, equalising hives, etc.

 

In my humble opinion, proceed with caution. Maybe experiment on one hive - if are an experienced beekeeper and you have a number of hives, and resume normal control methods as soon as possible, while deciding if you think further inquiry is justified.

 

@Gavin Smith 's study looked rigorous, however some odd results came out at the end.

 

Overall I personally would be interested to read any further info, as I would any links people have to Potassium Salts of Hops Beta Acid control all types of mites and ticks.

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I have settled on MAQs and Thymol. working very well for me.

 

Apiguard for Thymol?

 

I was talking to an organic beekeeper at the Hobsonville Farmer's Market on the weekend. He was using just Apiguard, and he indicated he had it in the hive pretty much all year except for winter and when the supers were on. He said he has been trialling the Nassenheider Formic Acid dispenser and was going to switch over all his hives to it. MAQS seems expensive, given the cost why do you prefer them over dispensers? Ease of use, safety perhaps?

 

I am quite interested in the potential of Potassium Salts of Hops Beta Acid, an organic contact miticide is quite an opportunity if they can sort out the issues the current products have.

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