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small honey extractor recomendation


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One thing that I have found interesting with all the replies is that no-one has mentioned about wether the frames are in the extractor correctly.   Firstly, cells are built onabout 9 deg angle to s

This is my homemade extractor works well, amazing what you can get made for a box of beers. Cost me less than $60 very simple, hardest part is getting the frames warm enough.

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My new two frame extractor is horrible. I start off slow, and build up speed, I hear clunks of wax and honey being torn away from the frame. I go slower and only small amts of honey come out. U tubed it and a lot of comments were that the two frame extractors are rubbish. Something about the centrifugal force not right..Really dissapointed. Hubby tried the drill on top to turn it with same disastrous results. Is there a way to extract honey while leaving the foundation in tact.

I'm a really big fan of radial extraction for wood and wax frames.

The forces run through the strongest rib of the comb and breakages are rare. And besides they are quicker extracting due to both sides being extracted simultaneously.

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So just to check, I have an elec reversible - if I were to use a cable tie to stop the baskets swinging to tangential position, would it work successfully as a radial ? Without damage ? Or does the swing mecahnism over ride any blocking ?

Thanks.

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We have a three frame unit from colfly on trademe which works well, I have personally only extracted three frames myself, broke the foundation as I went to fast to soon and the wife and kids sent me back to uncapping while they do the job properly.

 

My 3 framer works well with no damage to comb......my old galv one had a dent in the side which meant the baskets hit the side and the frames would fracture.

I have found with frames left over winter that are colder in temp the honey hard to extract..... whereas over summer and with fresh frames extraction is easy and only medium speed spinning is enough to extract all honey.

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My new two frame extractor is horrible. I start off slow, and build up speed, I hear clunks of wax and honey being torn away from the frame. I go slower and only small amts of honey come out. U tubed it and a lot of comments were that the two frame extractors are rubbish. Something about the centrifugal force not right..Really dissapointed. Hubby tried the drill on top to turn it with same disastrous results. Is there a way to extract honey while leaving the foundation in tact.

two frame or a 100 frame makes no difference.

sounds like yours has speed issues or possible frame position issue.

a big factor is what type of honey do you have? so homeys (eg manuka) do not spin out without pricking. trying to spin it fast to get it out simply destroys the comb. also what temp you have the frames at.

the other thing is to run it slow and get the bulk of the honey out before going faster.

 

I'm a really big fan of radial extraction for wood and wax frames.

The forces run through the strongest rib of the comb and breakages are rare. And besides they are quicker extracting due to both sides being extracted simultaneously.

 

my understanding is that radials are slower for hard to extract honeys, but quick on the easy stuff. thats due to the honey coming out at the cells angle. a tangent extractor the cell is lined up and the honey goes straight out, which is a lot easier for sticky honeys.

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I have a two frame tangential extractor and have extracted about 150 kg of clover so far with little effort. Without knowing your situation it is difficult to know what your problem is. I extract in a room with a temp over 30 deg centrigrade. I also extract pennyroyal which is quite thixotropic and it is much harder to extract. The fact that you are breaking frames suggests that you are spinning to fast resulting in to large a centripetal force (centrifugal force does not exist). In both types of extractors, centripetal force acts towards the centre and if this is large than friction holding the honey it "flies out" (actually it continues in a straight line until it hits the side wall of the extractor).

 

Here endeth the lesson

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Hi there, I am a small hive hobby beekeeper. I need to purchase an extractor and wondered if you could offer any advise as to a good reliable manual model. Either a 2 or 4 frame. Any advice regarding models and stockists would be greatly appreciated.

Any of the advice helping so far?

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So just to check, I have an elec reversible - if I were to use a cable tie to stop the baskets swinging to tangential position, would it work successfully as a radial ? Without damage ? Or does the swing mecahnism over ride any blocking ?

Thanks.

Until I get my new dedicated radial basket cable tying the baskets is exactly what I'm doing with my swing cages.(y)

It is working just fine for me and I've put 300 plus frames through so far.

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two frame or a 100 frame makes no difference.

sounds like yours has speed issues or possible frame position issue.

a big factor is what type of honey do you have? so homeys (eg manuka) do not spin out without pricking. trying to spin it fast to get it out simply destroys the comb. also what temp you have the frames at.

the other thing is to run it slow and get the bulk of the honey out before going faster.

 

 

 

my understanding is that radials are slower for hard to extract honeys, but quick on the easy stuff. thats due to the honey coming out at the cells angle. a tangent extractor the cell is lined up and the honey goes straight out, which is a lot easier for sticky honeys.

My honey is multi flora. I live in the middle of the waitakere hills so all sorts of nectar. It has an after taste so was thinking a little bit of manuka in it? Dark golden honey.I tried pricking capping with same problems. It does exactly as you described. Flies out the centre, wax and all. We started off slow and slowly increased in speed over about 3 minutes. After 10 mins only about a 1/4 of the honey had been extracted. I am using 3/4frames, would putting a piece of wood down the side of each frame level it off as there is a gap on the side of the basket.Extracted mid day in kitchen outside temp about 25 deg. Will try again tomorrow and see if I have better luck.

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The problem is thixotrophism, with manuka and kanuka honey being in a gel state which is almost impossible to spin out, and high speed can smash the frames. Commercial extraction facilities use systems which tickle the cells so that the honey becomes liquid and comes out easily.

Some years ago I was shown modified hair brush rollers which can do exactly that in small quantities, when used after uncapping. Work well and then the honey spins out easily. And can post pix tomorrow.

Similar tools, called "honey prickers", can be bought from suppliers, I don't know how well they do this.

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The problem is thixotrophism, with manuka and kanuka honey being in a gel state which is almost impossible to spin out, and high speed can smash the frames. Commercial extraction facilities use systems which tickle the cells so that the honey becomes liquid and comes out easily.

Some years ago I was shown modified hair brush rollers which can do exactly that in small quantities, when used after uncapping. Work well and then the honey spins out easily. And can post pix tomorrow.

Similar tools, called "honey prickers", can be bought from suppliers, I don't know how well they do this.

Ok thank you.Photos would be great. I did try two frames pricking with the kitchen fork (that took a while just in itself) So its not so much my extractor maybe but my honey. I will try an extraction from my sons hive in Te Atatu and see how I get on. Plus its raining today, so not chance of getting in the hive. Thanks for all the interesting information. Always learn something new on this forum/

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One thing that I have found interesting with all the replies is that no-one has mentioned about wether the frames are in the extractor correctly.

 

Firstly, cells are built onabout 9 deg angle to stop the nectar falling out and also to prevent the larvae falling out. This angle is important to extract the honey.

 

2. Work out which way your extractor goes (clockwise or anti-clockwise) when you are using it in your setup. Left handed people and right handed people make the extractor goes in different directions.

 

3. The frames must be loaded into the extractor with the bottom bar leading (or Top bar following). This will point the angle of the cell in best direction for the centrifugal (or centipetal) forces to fling the honey out.

 

4. Spin the extractor and about 1/2 speed (or at a speed the does not cause wobble). Extract about 1/2 the honey.

 

5 Rotate the frames so that the other side is on the outside and in the same orientation.

 

6 Remove all the honey from this side. increasing speed as the honey is removed.

 

7 Rotate the frames again to remove the last of the honey off side 1.

 

I always extract the heavy side of the frames first.

 

If you have the frames in the wrong orientation then the honey will not remove and you will break frames.

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One thing that I have found interesting with all the replies is that no-one has mentioned about wether the frames are in the extractor correctly.

 

....

 

If you have the frames in the wrong orientation then the honey will not remove and you will break frames.

 

 

Thanks Trevor, this is very useful information to a newbee about to extract for the first time!

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this is the down side of my electric extractor with no reverse rotation one side of frame extracts very well while other side when turned around takes a lot longer being tangential... knowledge comes at a price I guess.

Both sides should extract the same. Flip the frames do not rotate them. This leaves the orientation the same with the bottom bar leading.

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One thing that I have found interesting with all the replies is that no-one has mentioned about wether the frames are in the extractor correctly.

excellent point.

i clean forgot about it. its usually the first thing you have to teach the newbees operating the extractor.

with some of the designs putting the frame the wrong way around simply jams it as the top bar end hits the cross brace.

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Here are pix.

The roller is from a styling hair brusk, handle cut off.

Handle is from a paint roller as is the yellow insert, the roller needs to be drilled out to the correct size.

No breakage thus far, and all honey goes through double sieves so its safe.

I use 2 as they can get blocked up and need cleaning.

honey-tickler-4217.jpg.f5b2b6fb28aa5f080a89326c8ade9bb8.jpg

honey-tickler-4218.jpg.767ca6d5873bf7c2c151e060430c7af8.jpg

honey-tickler-4219.jpg.b8430e133e6a162213c3bfc267655a1c.jpg

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