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manuka wars

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5 km in each direction = 7853.98ha

Sounds a bit rich for 20 hives?

Yes, but it would be "very good".

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where I am the groups of hives are.spread out along along the coast in a line with no hives behind or in front of them for 10s to hundred of klms. Last season they seemed to do very well and were hanging out the front because they were full.

I do not think they were crowded.

the beek gives me a 20 litre bucket of honey

I am very happy with this as long as he gives me first extraction and keeps the Manuka for himself.

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Why would people in the south pay so much extra for manuka sites? We don't have active manuka.

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Why would people in the south pay so much extra for manuka sites? We don't have active manuka.

Ask around Janice, Wheels within wheels

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does anyone know why the manuka is not active south of a certain lattitude ???

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For the 19 odd years we have had our bees roughly about 3km apart for our full time sites but then the beekeepers pushing in are lucky to bee 500 meters away from our sites and throw in a few more sites in between :thumbdown:

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where I am the groups of hives are.spread out along along the coast in a line with no hives behind or in front of them for 10s to hundred of klms. Last season they seemed to do very well and were hanging out the front because they were full.

I do not think they were crowded.

the beek gives me a 20 litre bucket of honey

I am very happy with this as long as he gives me first extraction and keeps the Manuka for himself.

Do you mean that the hives are in a line 10s to hundreds of Kms long or are there no other hives for 10s to hundreds of kms?

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I read.a.thesis about Manuka and the author found an area on the west.coast of the south island with high active.manuka. It may have been karamea . The link to this thesis was on this Site

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they are spread along a coastal area mostly on the doc estate. With the nat park behind and not far to the sea in front. There is only one road

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5 km in each direction = 7853.98ha

Sounds a bit rich for 20 hives?

If the apiaries are spaced at 5km then each has around 2165ha as home range before the forragers stray closer to their neighbors than to home.

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does anyone know why the manuka is not active south of a certain lattitude ???

 

The Jonathan Stephens' thesis says it's because of the Manuka sub-genus - some produce higher UMF than others. Some would speculate that climate/environmental factors might play a part also, but I haven't seen any evidence of this, and it might turn out to be as correct as those who said volcanic soils containing sulpher, and those who said water e.g. swamps helps produce high UMF...

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the hives are only here in the summer.

there is generally a lot of forage.

kamahi, mahoe, Manuka, kanuka, rata, white rata vine,pasture,

but late season is hard suddenly the supplies dry up and there are very strong hives and lovely calm warm weather.

then it is crowded untill the hives.are taken away

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my reading of the thesis suggested it was more active in the poorer

soils , and coastal areas with even temp.

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Why would people in the south pay so much extra for manuka sites? We don't have active manuka.

Since when did the south island not have active manuka...?

 

admin edit: fixed quote box

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Since they dont want the north island beekepers to know lol :lol

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Maybe the manuka cowboys in the north can go down south to chase the non active manuka ;)

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Since when did the south island not have active manuka...?

Isn't everything south of Wellington a bit dull? :P

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Yup. Horrid .

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I dont remember who did the research maybe AMHA ? But there are only small pockets of active Manuka in the South Island. Sometimes one valley will produce it and the one over the ridge dosnt.

 

Im no scientist but in my opinion activity is more than just plant species i think soil type has something to do with it.

 

We scraped in with a 5+ only once and we have been taking honey from that area for more than 10 years.

Funny thing was it wasnt even a Manuka honey it was so heavily contaminated with honeydew but because it tested active Hey Presto the fairy waved his magic wand and it was deemed to be Manuka.

 

Thats why I know having a Manuka standard based on level of activity is a total sham.

.

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There's a Waikato University research paper online that goes into all this manuka stuff. Basically in the South Island only a small part of the West Coast produces high activity manuka honey.

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Maybe the manuka cowboys in the north can go down south to chase the non active manuka ;)

Maybe you could do some homework on Manuka and its value/kg.

Find out what constitutes Manuka honey,

You may be surprised whats what

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You mean what constitutes manuka at the moment cause I'm sure it will keep on changing :thumbdown: bring back the good old days when manuka was just good on your toast ;)

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You mean what constitutes manuka at the moment cause I'm sure it will keep on changing :thumbdown: bring back the good old days when manuka was just good on your toast ;)

 

Ha! In the "good" old days the Honey Marketing Board wouldn't even purchase it! There are reports of beeks dumping Manuka e.g. see Cliff's book. As another example, I have a B&W image of beeks washing out the confounded Manuka from their hives. Think I've posted it on this site.

 

Maybe in future we'll look back at these current years as the good old days!

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