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Apitherapy - Bee venom


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I am a skeptical soul at heart so if you find the following a little hard to digest I can't blame you. As well as being a keen beekeeper I also enjoy running. 18 weeks ago I broke my ankle while out running and spent the next six weeks in a cast. As soon as it was of I attempted to start running again but my ankle was to sore and swollen to do so. As of 4 days ago my ankle was still very puffy and my GP advised that that will probably always be the case and to get used to it. Well desperate times can lead to desperate measures so I thought I would try a bit of quackery as I had nothing to lose. Sacrificed 6 of my girls by forcing them to sting my ankle and left each of the stings in for 15 minutes. Ankle became even more swollen and on the first night I was cursing myself for being so gullible. But three days later all the swelling has gone, I can see my ankle for the first time in 18 weeks and I have regained flexibility in my ankle. Tomorrow I will be going for a run. Have even got got before and after photos.

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Don't get me wrong, I am all for trying alternative remedies but I also think the mind is much more powerfull then we think it is so who knows... I am glad you regained your flexibility, that is all that matters :-).

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I busted my ankle about 6 months ago and it still gives me greif and is swollen, cant run on it etc... me and bee stings dont go well so I will leave that treatment alone (I had thought of it before my one and only bad experience with the stinger of a bee that I left in until I had closed up the hive, ended up calling an ambulance) I am glad it worked for you, nature has so much healing available to us.

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Hey beepete, how's the ankle holding up after running on it?

Hi Janice, went for my second run today and absolutely chuffed to report that my ankle is fine. Who would of thought that bee stings could eliminate swelling, increase flexibility and mitigate pain.

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Is there a difference in venom potency between nurse, guard and forager bees and early, mid and late in the season? I have had different reactions to the stings I have received lately from very slight itching to painfully swollen so wondered if the different stages of a bees life might have different venom potency levels. Normally I swell quite bad so to have virtually no reaction was a pleasant surprise

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I don't know if anyone has done the science but I have noticed that old overwintered bees can really pack a wallop.the quicker you get a sting out the less poison you will get, being quick really does make a difference. One of my sons got a sting on his foot a couple of weeks ago and had some mild swelling but unfortunately the sting introduced an infection to his foot which became incredibly swollen and painful and he had to go on intravenous antibiotics and very nearly into hospital.I've never heard of this before and it certainly never happened to me.

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Is there a difference in venom potency between nurse, guard and forager bees and early, mid and late in the season? I have had different reactions to the stings I have received lately from very slight itching to painfully swollen so wondered if the different stages of a bees life might have different venom potency levels. Normally I swell quite bad so to have virtually no reaction was a pleasant surprise

I understand that newly emerged bees have practically no venom to discharge, and that it seems to take quite some time for the young bee to fill her poison sac. If this is true, then coupled with the percentage of young bees to total hive population, (co-relates to the chance of being stung by a non venomous bee against an old bee with stronger or more mature venom), and the time of the bee season, I would expect the severity of the reaction to stinging to vary.

Maybe the potency of the venom increases with time? The constituents, histamine and various proteins, could be continuously metabolised by the bee, thus strengthening the solution as the non active component is lost through normal processes. Who knows?...But I would dearly love to have the resources to experiment and find out just what is happening within the venom sac....

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That is what I was thinking as well. No point having a guard bee with little venom, so once their venom is at at a point where it can do its job properly the nurses go on active duty.

 

Maybe those practicing apitherapy could take note of the suspected age of the bee and the induced reaction and report back with their findings

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I think is a micro-syringe used by a therapist(api) using bee venom vials.

You can calculate exactly the dosage and desensitize the patient. I think we talked a bit about this here on the forum few years ago.

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Explain please

 

Sure Trevor. Micro stinging is actually when you use tweezers to remove the stinger from the bee. Then the stinger is held by the tips of a special pair of precision tweezers nearest to the point of the stinger so as not to squeeze any of the venom out. Then small, brief stings are made on the area being treated. You can barely feel them at all and the results are still amazing. You can get about 10 to 15 micro stings out of one stinger. Taking the venom directly from the stinger is always more effective than using venom from vials. However venom from vials also has its place too as Kiwi Bee stated because you can calculate the exact dosage for treatments that require it for more complex types of illnesses and also for oral administration.

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