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pseudopanax (five finger)


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IMG_20140817_160414.JPG.fa8b34583afdc8041b8f19f73a1f663c.JPG Bees are going hard on this one at the moment, I've always thought it's an important winter food source for the bees, but I've never bothered to look for them working it until the other day. I wonder if the honey tastes any good?

IMG_20140817_160414.JPG.fa8b34583afdc8041b8f19f73a1f663c.JPG

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[ATTACH=full]6578[/ATTACH] Bees are going hard on this one at the moment, I've always thought it's an important winter food source for the bees, but I've never bothered to look for them working it until the other day. I wonder if the honey tastes any good?

I had a sample that was identified as pseudopanax by pollen content. Tastes and smells like plastic.

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I'm after seeds from the pseudopanax arboreus! anyone got any or know what the best time to harvest them. I'm currently planting out our queen rearing area, manuka, flax, cabbage trees, Pittosporums, and want to add five finger.

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Yea have nearly finished this years planting but just want to get some of these in now, so will be purchasing the first lot but i already got seedling trays going for manuka for next year, so if i can get five finger seeds now will have plenty for planting out this time next year.

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I'm after seeds from the pseudopanax arboreus! anyone got any or know what the best time to harvest them. I'm currently planting out our queen rearing area, manuka, flax, cabbage trees, Pittosporums, and want to add five finger.

Can get seedlings at the farmers market here if that helps

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flowering time varies from area to area. Five finger is one of the best early spring sources of both nectar and pollen. We don't often have enough good weather to get a surplus but it can happen. I've always thought it was a rather pleasant honey and it certainly smells amazing when the bees are working it . The pollen comes in huge loads and is normally a very light yellow, almost white. This plant has certainly become more important now that possums have been largely controlled in Hawke's Bay.

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Can get seedlings at the farmers market here if that helps

Oh yep thats what im looking for, Is there a nursery stand there?, Might have to get you to grab some for me and i can shoot over and pick them up, my weekends are booked solid with kids sports, are they ready to plant out or ready for re-potting, I'm also looking for lace bark that's seems quite hard to find.

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Oh yep thats what im looking for, Is there a nursery stand there?, Might have to get you to grab some for me and i can shoot over and pick them up, my weekends are booked solid with kids sports, are they ready to plant out or ready for re-potting, I'm also looking for lace bark that's seems quite hard to find.

Try these guys: Treeline Native Nursery, growers of a wide range of high quality, hardy New Zealand native plants. great people to deal with and prices are good too.

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Just found this one

source Bees & Trees - Tree Crops

 

Trees which satisfy these needs

The aim must be to provide food for the bee throughout as much of the year as possible. There are many useful sources of nectar and pollen, and this list is but a small selection of potential trees for bees. Look around your area to see what bees appreciate at different times of the year.

 

Wattles (eg Acacia baileyana or A. decurrens) are valuable pollen sources, from July to September and beyond. Acacia retinoides provide hardy shelter, flowering March to May.

 

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Bees work female kiwifruit flowers for pollen which has about as much goodness as a diet Coke. I think generally the pretty good at selecting the best when given the chance but when pushed hard enough they will even work Pinetree pollen which is really only good for causing allergies and making pretty yellow edges to the puddles (and I suppose making more pine trees). It does appear that in some cases quantity can go some way to replace quality. Willow is a case in point with fairly low protein but no one can deny how well they do on. They certainly do work wattle of which there are many varieties and it doesn't seem to do them any harm.

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