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Yes ChrisNZ is and I may do at some point. Currently I use a reference book and my online blog. I think its probably practical after you get to multiple sites or more than 5 hives.

Grant, do you have another blog going as well as running this site? busy man(y)

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Grant, do you have another blog going as well as running this site? busy man(y)

the diary link is my blog. No I have enough to keep up with my 2 other weather forums, both of which needed sorting out before Christmas.

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Thanks for finding this - I'll give it a go Cheers

 

I am currently using www.hivetracks.com I looked at beetight but it wanted to put in too much info, but it can be used with a smart phone.

Hive tracks is a bit more simple and as a new bee I thought it had all the info that I wanted. It is also free regardless of howmany hives you have.

It has good mapping (google) and current weather. The only problem is the time but I don't see that as a particular problem.

Cheers

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  • 2 weeks later...
I will confess now that I was challenged about this "Hive track' and ended up entering all my hives .

Easy to use for a technophobe like me, and has some great reports.The site tells me there a few other in NZ using it so maybe it will get popular.

 

I did not like making my sites shared so I made mine private so no-one else can see where your sites are. Big security risk I feel.

When you create a yeard do not check the box by postcode, then no one else can see your sites.

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Ok so I do transfer the important stuff onto a spreadsheet.

 

Only if you want to.

Depends on how many years or hive etc.

Just register, get set up and then start with a few hives until you decide. You can print out an inspection sheet and this can be transfered to your note book later if you don't like it.

Walk slow. Like the cheese add. Good things take time.

You will make mistakes but that is how to learn.

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Am amazed folk will commit their records to an on-line site in the USA!!! There are so many potential logistical flaws in this philosophy. And having had a peek at the web-sites - what an over-kill. OK it's full of nice little pictures and gimicky, shows reports and options etc but records like that that don't make up for hands on beekeeping and experience. A good old Apiary log book can easily, and reliably hold your necessary details - guaranteed free from flat batteries, satellite failure, power failures (Chch EQs, Akld outages etc), USA economic turn down (it's still imploding), storage media failure, system failure, system restore delays, inadvertant data loss, world trade problems ... blah blah stuff. It is easy and simple to keep an apiary log book in the truck for the records you need for practical onsite management of your apiary or apiaries (I ran over 700 hives [avg 20 hives per apiary] using such, single handed). Transfer from your log book if you really want to into spreadsheets as some suggest, but keep your records on your own systems at all times. If you use a PC, use your own backup methods - really easy these days with datasticks and cheap hard disk drives. Don't rely on someplace overseas on which to accumulate your operational data, you could loose it in the flash of a sunspot. That's potential data suicide with the economic state of the world to-day.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Am amazed folk will commit their records to an on-line site in the USA!!! There are so many potential logistical flaws in this philosophy. And having had a peek at the web-sites - what an over-kill. OK it's full of nice little pictures and gimicky, shows reports and options etc but records like that that don't make up for hands on beekeeping and experience. A good old Apiary log book can easily, and reliably hold your necessary details - guaranteed free from flat batteries, satellite failure, power failures (Chch EQs, Akld outages etc), USA economic turn down (it's still imploding), storage media failure, system failure, system restore delays, inadvertant data loss, world trade problems ... blah blah stuff. It is easy and simple to keep an apiary log book in the truck for the records you need for practical onsite management of your apiary or apiaries (I ran over 700 hives [avg 20 hives per apiary] using such, single handed). Transfer from your log book if you really want to into spreadsheets as some suggest, but keep your records on your own systems at all times. If you use a PC, use your own backup methods - really easy these days with datasticks and cheap hard disk drives. Don't rely on someplace overseas on which to accumulate your operational data, you could loose it in the flash of a sunspot. That's potential data suicide with the economic state of the world to-day.

Totally agree, but fun for a couple of hives. Definately keep a paper trail. And you can always make pc based spread sheets at anytime with the hard copy data.

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I am sure that beehavn is aware that this forum is on a site designed overseas and hosted on a server who knows where and all our computing could be going to the cloud in the near future.

If you are a techno geek and like the website based systems, then go for it. You do have the facilities to make hard copies from time to time should you so wish.

I tried both HiveTracks and BeeTight but find them to time consuming against pen and paper while at my sites and the info is fresh in my mind.

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Fortunately I'm only using for interest and bit of a yarn. It won't matter if it vanishes and I have no paper trail of it. It is of course a pity it isn't located in NZ, but then I use a Scottish Newspaper for my "home" page in preference to xtra.co.nz / Yahoo.co.nz's Americanised NZ news pages. (:-))

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I destroyed one mobile with beehive resins. Not good idea to use Ipod or another tech in this dirty job.

 

The nursing strategy varies around the year. I have not seen that records follow that idea.

Strange things has been captured in these notes like "amount of flying bees".

Then I can find me by the help of satellite. Where are my hives? I look from satellite!

 

In normal database there is often 1) steady data 2) data which varies and in beekeeping data it should be 3) data according course of the year (build up, swarming, extracting, going towads Autumn, wintering, queen rearing, selecting mother queens)

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